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The Curry Club, a traditional Indian restaurant that opened in Chesterfield in December, offers everything from unique curries and rice dishes to dosas – crêpelike dishes made to order in an open kitchen – in a quick-service setting.

The restaurant comes from Prasanthi Akkineni, Sri Lakshmi Gurram, Mallikarjun Rao Rangineni, Rajesh Pudota and Suresh Cherukuri, who hail from the state of Andhra Pradesh in southern India. The quintet worked with mentor Venkat Kuchipudi to develop the menu.

“At the heart, it’s traditional Indian food, done fast,” says Rangineni, who previously operated an Indian grocery store. “People can order and get their food in five minutes. We want to make the most authentic Indian food in St. Louis. We’re making it taste exactly like it does in India as best as we can with what we can get here. It’s a notch above what everyone else is offering.”

The eatery fills roughly 2,000 square feet (previously occupied by a Jet’s Pizza) and seats roughly 44. The minimal, contemporary room focuses on the ordering counter and open kitchen, where dosas are made. Sustainability looms large here, with eco-friendly products throughout.

The Curry Club offers three separate menus: lunch, dinner and weekend. The main go-to for lunchtime, a combo that starts at $5.99, features two curries, the Indian flatbread naan and rice. The selection rotates daily. Popular picks include cilantro chicken and the heat-packed curry club chicken. All dishes use house-ground spices.

As another highlight of the menus, a set of rice specials includes gongura fried rice. The tart, edible leaves of the gongura plant, a member of the hibiscus genus, are made into a paste and cooked with rice along with spices, served with the yogurt-based condiment raita and fried boondi, a sweet snack mix made with chickpea flour.

In addition to unique offerings like nellore chepala pulusu – a regional fish curry – The Curry Club offers various snacks, rice-based biryanis and options prepared in the tandoor, the high-temperature Indian oven. A main attraction, the restaurant’s dosas come in such options as onion, masala (a blend of ground spices) and chili-cheese, as well as with alternative batters made with a variety of lentils. Served on metal trays as large rolls or even cones, the dosas also come with the diner’s choice of chutneys and would make a fine way to getting rockin’ for Grease from STAGES St. Louis.

Additional offerings on weekends include breakfast items like vada, a savory fried dough. House-made beverages, meanwhile, include standards like mango lassi (a blend of yogurt, water and spices) with lesser-known drinks like dessertworthy paan falooda, whose ingredients include ice cream, chia seeds, noodles and rose syrup.

“We’re offering a mix of items people may already know, as well as items that might require more explanation,” Pudota says. “We want people to taste these as well – not just things they’re already having in other restaurants. You might not find half of these items anywhere else.” [LN dingbat]

The Curry Club, 1635 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, 636-778-7777, stlcurryclub.com