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Resale Primer: A Stylish Blast from the Past - Ladue News: Fashion & Living

Resale Primer: A Stylish Blast from the Past

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Posted: Thursday, August 22, 2013 12:00 pm

Stored away in bins, at the back of racks or deep inside display cabinets are those hidden gems the most stylish of people always seem the find—that scarf no one else could pull off, those distinctive earrings, that lust-worthy bag. If it’s uniqueness you’re after, shopping at vintage, resale or consignment stores may be the missing piece of your shopping routine. 

“I enjoy seeing people who have used vintage styles in their own ways—that is, taking a period piece and making it their own look,” explains Jolie Mackney, owner of The Vintage Haberdashery. She says that while some shoppers truly dress the era, others introduce vintage into their personal style. 

The items in many resale, consignment and vintage shops may look like new, but the shopping experience is quite different. “Allow yourself enough time; because unlike going into a boutique where they have 10 of the exact same item, resale is many, many individual pieces,” says Diana Ford, the Women’s Closet Exchange director of marketing. “Give yourself more time than you would at a typical boutique or department store.”

While quality and condition should be checked for all purchased items, new or used, extra attention should be given to vintage items before purchase. Mackey says the underarms, which can show signs of disintegration, always should be checked when buying older items. Stains or tears should be addressed with the store owner or clerk, who can explain what, if anything, has been done to repair or clean the item before it hit the shelves.

Another thing to remember, according to Mackey, is that a lot of clothing found in vintage stores was saved throughout the years because of its emotional importance—and many times, that means the items were worn by younger women. “You’re going to find a lot of clothes smaller—and fewer clothes larger,” Mackney explains. “Do not be discouraged if you go into a vintage shop and there’s not a big selection in your size. Come back; stock always revolves.”

When it comes to price, Mackney recommends shoppers think about how much it would cost to buy the same type of item new. At retail stores specifically, Ford says you should expect to pay “anywhere from one-third to half of what it was new.”

If you’re in the market to sell, Emily Elbert, owner of Byrd Designer Consignment Boutique, has a few tips. “Try to keep original receipts for big-ticket items,” she explains. “That helps a lot in determining a price for resale. Keep authenticity cards, dust bags—even shoe boxes and sunglass cases. This all aids in the marketing and reselling of the item.”

Before bringing the items to the store, find out what the shop is accepting and how they are accepting it. “Typically, everything should be clean and without any stains or tears, because it needs to be something somebody would wear,” Ford explains. “The better your items look, the more money you will get for them.” She explains rarity, store inventory and demand control price. “And you must, must be finished with an item. We don’t ever want people to leave our store with supplier’s remorse.”

The selling process may be the only time buyers note the real difference between consignment and resale shops. “People interchange the terms all the time,” Elbert says of consignment and resale. “To the actual customer, there’s not a big difference; but to the store owner, it’s the very business model. The business does not own the inventory. The consigner still owns the item and is paid once it sells.” Elbert explains consignment policies vary, but often include a 90-day contracted selling period, as well as 40- to 50-percent profit to the seller should the item be purchased.

“In my opinion, consignment is a very transparent way for you to sell your clothes, because the store owner will provide the consigner with a contract, so you know what each item will sell for,” Elbert says, noting that not all resale stores tell suppliers wheat the item’s list price will be, making it harder to tell if you’re getting the right amount.

If you are offered less for an item than you wanted, Ford has this reminder: “Something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it. The reason people shop resale is because they didn’t want to pay retail prices. What is it worth in your closet if you’re not wearing it?”

Should an item not be accepted at all, Elbert says not to be offended; instead, visit another shop. “Try to think of it as purely transactional,” Elbert explains. “The shop owner knows what will sell in their store, so your items might not be a good fit for their customer base. It has nothing to do with what you’re bringing them.”

 

Byrd Designer Consignment Boutique

8117 Maryland Ave.

Find: Designer clothing, shoes, jewelry and accessories

Bring: Items for consignment

 

 

Clubhouse Shop

4245 Forest Park Ave.

Find: Furniture, antiques, clothing, collectables, home items

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

 

Ditto

10027 Manchester Road

Find: Clothing, accessories, shoes, home, furniture, antiques, sporting goods, books, toys

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

 

Dos Resale Boutique

14 S. Central Ave.

Find: Current, brand-name clothing, shoes and accessories

Bring: Items for purchase

 

 

Encore Consignment Gallery

287 Lamp and Lantern Village

Find: Furniture, antiques, art, rugs and home décor

Bring: Items for consignment

 

 

Habitat For Humanity ReStore

2117 Sams Drive

Find: Furniture, building supplies, appliances, home accessories

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

 

Miriam Switching Post

2171 S. Big Bend Blvd.

Find: Furniture, home accessories and décor, antiques, artwork

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

 

Phoenix Project Resale*

5421 Hampton Ave.

Find: Women’s clothing, children’s clothing, some vintage and some designer, accessories, shoes, jewelry

Bring: Donations

 

[RE]FRESH

1710 S. Brentwood Blvd.

Find: Clothing, accessories and shoes for teens and adults, including formalwear, semi-formalwear, name-brands and designers.

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

Rung Boutique

9739 Manchester Road

Find: Women’s attire and accessories

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

Sprung Boutique

9741 Manchester Road

Find: Maternity clothing, children’s clothing, accessories

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

The Green Goose Resale & Consignment*

5611 Hampton Ave.

Find: Furniture, home décor, gifts, candles and jewelry in the categories of antique, vintage, mid-century, contemporary and modern

Bring: Items for consignment

 

The Refind Room

2525 S. Brentwood Blvd.

Find: New, vintage and antique furniture and home accessories

Bring: Items for purchase

 

The Scholar Shop

8211 Clayton Road

Find: Clothing, shoes and accessories for women, men and children

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

The Village Green

10212 Watson Road

Find: Antiques, furniture, home décor, artwork, collectables, estate jewelry

Bring: Donations

Nonprofit

 

The Vintage Haberdashery

3181 Morganford Road

Find: Purchasable and rentable vintage attire and accessories

Bring: Items for purchase

 

Upscale Resale Boutique

10042 Manchester Road

Find: Name-brand and designer women’s clothing, shoes and accessories

Bring: Items for consignment

Nonprofit

 

Women’s Closet Exchange

11575 Gravois Road

Find: Name-brand and designer women’s clothing, shoes and accessories

Bring: Items for purchase

 

*A portion of proceeds benefit charity

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