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Some of St. Louis\u2019 most creative and celebrated interior designers are transforming 12 spaces inside the 2016 Ladue News Show House at 4388 Westminster Place, a historic property built in 1897 in the Central West End. The following previews share a behind-the-scenes look at three rooms in the Show House \u2013 the family room, the kitchen/breakfast room, and the den/office \u2013 and the designers\u2019 visions and plans for them. The Show House will celebrate its preview party Thursday, Oct. 20, and will open to the public on Oct. 22.

Pick up the Oct. 28 and Nov. 4 issues of Ladue News for the remaining room previews in advance of the Show House\u2019s big reveal in the Nov. 11 issue. To learn more about the Show House or to buy tickets for general admission, click here.

\"family
family room
\"Amanda

Amanda Rogers Matzke

Family Room

Designers: Jan Alred, Amanda Matzke and Robert Van de Wiele of Ethan Allen Retail, Inc.

The Show House\u2019s family room spoke to Ethan Allen Retail, Inc. design consultant Jan Alred \u2013 and it spoke loudly. Its bold architecture features high ceilings, crown molding, a large fireplace and Corinthian columns atop low bookcases that divide the expansive room. Alred, with designers Amanda Matzke and Robert Van de Wiele, wanted to tone down the space and \u201crelax it.\u201d The family room features a soothing color palette of seaside green, blue and shades of gray. \u201cGrays have taken over as the new neutral for some time now,\u201d says Alred, who has worked with Ethan Allen in St. Louis for the greater part of her 25-year interior design career. All of the furniture pieces, such as the Sayville single cabinet and Jacob barrel chair, are romantically French-accented and showcase Ethan Allen\u2019s new collections. \u201cWe decided to bring a soft look to the bold lines of the room so when you come in, you can relax your mind,\u201d Alred says.

Ethan Allen Retail, Inc., 16860 Chesterfield Airport Road, Chesterfield, 636-536-2774, ethanallen.com

\"Breakfast
Breakfast Room_Kitchen

Kitchen/Breakfast Room

Designer: David Deatherage of David Deatherage Design

David Deatherage of David Deatherage Design transforms the compact breakfast alcove in the Show House kitchen into a special spot perfect for purposes far beyond a morning meal. He describes it as a place \u201cnot just for morning coffee but also for reading, working from a laptop or intimate candlelight dining.\u201d Deatherage was drawn to the breakfast room because of its character, from the beadboard ceiling to the original butler\u2019s pantry. \u201cI saw a lot of ways to use the space,\u201d he says. The designer\u2019s talent for blending glamour into historic design is showcased through details such as the geometric Herm\u00e8s wallpaper and the antique French chairs adorned with zebra-hide seats. Deatherage has been designing interiors for the past five years.

David Deatherage Design, 314-495-3719, daviddeatheragedesign.com

\"Office_ADJ\"
Office_ADJ
\"dottie

Dottie Eaton

Den/Office

Designer: Dottie Eaton of Design Style

Dottie Eaton, founder of Design Style, admired the Show House den for its potential to be a woman\u2019s retreat. A prominent bay window is the room\u2019s centerpiece and served as Eaton\u2019s inspiration, along with Led Zeppelin\u2019s song \u201cGoing to California,\u201d which describes a girl with \u201clove in her eyes and flowers in her hair.\u201d Eaton imagined what that free-spirited woman\u2019s den or office would look like \u2013 from the handcrafted desk to the floor-to-ceiling flower painting on the wall. \u201cThe whole idea of the painting is these undulating, flowing flowers that add some visual interest to the room,\u201d Eaton says. Music, she adds, often inspires her designs, along with nature and art. Eaton comes from an art background and has been designing and styling interiors for more than 10 years.

Design Style, 314-324-2203, designstyle-ds.com

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\"winteropera\"

Joel Rogier, left, Kathy Pyeatt, and Zach Devin

The City of Lights, a lovely lady and filthy lucre \u2013 all three, in just a week, will enliven the 10th-season debut of Winter Opera Saint Louis, n\u00e9 New Opera St. Louis, whose tagline promises \u201cPerformances that warm the soul.\u201d

The Merry Widow, the comedic opus in question, will take the stage at Chaminade College Preparatory School\u2019s Skip Viragh Center for the Arts Oct. 28 and 30, and Gina Galati, the company\u2019s founder and general director, self-evidently delights in discussing the debut.

\u201cThe Merry Widow is a comic operetta with beautiful and familiar melodies such as \u2018Vilia,\u2019 \u2018I Am Off to Chez Maxime\u2019s\u2019 and \u2018Red as the Rose of Maytime,\u2019\u201d Galati relates of the season opener by Austro-Hungarian composer Franz Leh\u00e1r, which premiered in 1905 in Vienna.

\u201cIt\u2019s also known as one of the greatest waltzing operettas not written by [Austrian composer Johann] Strauss, so it has many upbeat waltzes. The story takes place in Paris. The ambassador, Baron Zeta, must find a way to save his country from bankruptcy. One solution is to prevent the rich and beautiful heiress Hanna from marrying a foreigner.\u201d

Kathy Pyeatt will portray Hanna, the titular widow, she adds, with other roles filled by Gary Moss, Clark Sturdevant and Jack Swanson.

A celebratory rationale prompted the choice of the Leh\u00e1r operetta as the opener, says Galati.

\u201cWe wanted to start our 10th season with a bang \u2013 with dancers, a large chorus and many roles played by local artists,\u201d she relates. \u201cWe do have some artists coming in from out of town, but this is a great opportunity to showcase St. Louis talent.\u201d

That said, the choice did prompt a spot of institutional soul-searching.

\u201cWe\u2019re performing The Merry Widow in English,\u201d Galati says. \u201cThis was a difficult decision because it\u2019s our longstanding practice to perform in the original language, which in this case is German. But there\u2019s so much dialogue in this show that I felt the audience would better enjoy the wordplay \u2013 especially the jokes \u2013 in English.

\u201cAnd recently, many national and regional operas \u2013 not the least of which is [New York\u2019s Metropolitan Opera] \u2013 have been producing The Merry Widow in English. We\u2019re using a translation by Dean Anthony, our director, that\u2019s guaranteed to have a lot of laughs.\u201d

With equal enthusiasm, Galati succinctly previews the season\u2019s two remaining operas, as well as a December event.

\u201c[Italian composer Gioachino] Rossini\u2019s La Cenerentola is a light-hearted Cinderella story with lots of vocal fireworks and funny characters,\u201d she says. \u201cThe two stepsisters are a hoot, and there are many impressive high Cs for the tenor.

\u201c[French composer Georges Bizet\u2019s] Carmen has incredible music, including many of opera\u2019s greatest hits. We have an Italian mezzo-soprano, Bernadetta Orsi, who blew away everyone at our auditions in New York City when she came in to sing Carmen. She\u2019s going to be a showstopper.

\u201cAnd Holidays on the Hill, which this year will be Dec. 6 and 7, continues its tradition as one of the best holiday parties in town, combining the gourmet Italian cuisine of Dominic\u2019s on The Hill with beautiful holiday music by our [Winter Opera Saint Louis] artists.\u201d

La Cenerentola, it bears noting, will take the stage Jan. 27 and 29; Carmen, March 3 and 5. Also, the December event enjoys a familial connection, as Galati\u2019s parents own and operate Dominic\u2019s.

Galati \u2013 herself an acclaimed soprano who earned a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences degree in music from Washington University in St. Louis, a master\u2019s degree in opera from the University of Kansas in Lawrence and a third credential from an Italian institution \u2013 reflects at length on the history of her company, a nonprofit organization that seeks \u201cto provide St. Louis with world-class operatic performances during the winter,\u201d according to its website.

Initially, it operated from an office in her living room and performed in manifold local venues. \u201cI felt a bit like La Boh\u00e8me, bouncing around like that \u2013 it was difficult,\u201d she says, referring to the classic opera by Italian composer Giacomo Puccini, in which Galati has sung. \u201cBut our company \u2013 and, more important, our audiences \u2013 grew very rapidly.\u201d

The company\u2019s opening daze still seemingly has Galati a bit dazzled.

\u201cOur biggest high point, of course, was our first production, of [Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi\u2019s] Rigoletto in St. Ambrose Church,\u201d she recalls, mentioning a Roman Catholic landmark on The Hill. \u201cIt was an exciting, magical production, and I was so proud to bring such an incredible event to my own neighborhood.\u201d

In 2012, the company moved from Galati\u2019s living room into a bona fide office. Then, in 2013, New Opera St. Louis became Winter Opera Saint Louis between its third and fourth seasons for an amusing reason. \u201cOur attorney said that we were no longer new and we needed to change the name,\u201d Galati wryly explains. \u201cPaul Weil [the attorney in question] came up with the name Winter Opera Saint Louis.\u201d

She also cites as a high point moving the company\u2019s productions into the Viragh Center. \u201cOur attorney got wind that Chaminade was building a state-of-the-art theater with a pit for the orchestra, and we jumped on the opportunity to have a home for the company,\u201d Galati says. \u201cI had recommendations sent in by two monsignors, alumni of Chaminade and anyone who might have an influence. My next step was contacting the Pope \u2013 I was getting into that gorgeous space!

\u201cI heard later that the administrator of the school said something to the effect of \u2018I don\u2019t know who this Gina Galati is, but she sure knows a lot of people, and she sure is persistent!\u2019\u201d

Also, this past summer witnessed the opening of a costume and design shop under the direction of the company\u2019s costume designer, J.C. Krajicek. \u201cWe\u2019ve been so busy that we have had to purchase more sewing equipment for the shop,\u201d Galati says, \u201cand even the neighborhood is beginning to bring us alterations, such as bridesmaids\u2019 dresses and some design work from scratch.

\u201cWe\u2019re very fortunate things have been going well, and the design-and-alterations business is another way to keep cash flow during our season and keeping our name out in the community.\u201d

Not everything, naturally, has proceeded apace.

\u201cI started the opera company in the financially significant year of 2008,\u201d Galati ruefully recalls. \u201cAnd after the first production of Rigoletto, we had the world at our feet \u2013 and a stock market acting like it was the end of the world.

\u201cSo we had some financial problems in our second season, and I wasn\u2019t sure how we would come out of it. It affected all of the arts in town. We were a new company without much support, but we were fortunate to make it through.\u201d

With the recession (knock wood) ended, she expresses hope for continuing growth in the company\u2019s second decade. \u201cI look forward to seeing the company gain more patrons and financial support and to continually improve the quality of our productions,\u201d Galati says.

\u201cWe also have in its final stages a national education program to bring opera and classical music to schools in a fun and exciting way. We\u2019re waiting for funding and look forward to announcing our project soon.

\u201cWe\u2019ve completely outgrown our offices, especially now that our alterations and costume shop is doing so well; we will most likely be moving in the next couple years. We\u2019re looking for a larger rehearsal studio, and of course, I could always use some more help in the office.\u201d

Ironically, failure sparked Galati\u2019s present success. As a 19-year-old business major at Saint Louis University, she flunked an econ class, and that \u201ccourse crash\u201d led her to change her major to music. Yet she\u2019s chosen not to play the \u201cWhat if \u2026 ?\u201d game.

\u201cI have actually never speculated how my life would have gone if I would have passed econ,\u201d Galati confesses. \u201cHonestly, I don\u2019t usually question things that cross my path. I just have faith that the Man Upstairs is looking out for me \u2013 and for Winter Opera, of course.\u201d

Winter Opera Saint Louis, 2322 Marconi Ave., St. Louis, 314-865-0038, winteroperastl.org

\"winteropera2\"

Stage director Dean Anthony, center, rehearses with Joel Rogier, left, and Zach Devin

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\"PinkRibbon.jpg\"
PinkRibbon.jpg

Orange and black have long been the colors associated with October, as autumn takes hold and Halloween caps off the month. But in recent years, October also has been associated with pink, the color representing Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM).

Since BCAM was established by the American Cancer Society (ACS) in 1985 and the pink-ribbon icon was introduced by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation in 1993, pink has proliferated in October to remind women of the importance of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

Experts extol the progress made in breast cancer prevention and early detection, yet the ACS\u2019s statistics remain sobering: Breast cancer remains the second-most common cancer among American women (behind only skin cancer), and women in the U.S. still have a 1-in-8 lifetime risk of being diagnosed. However, survival rates have improved in the past two decades, with the death rate decreasing by 23 percent between 1991 and 2012, and it\u2019s clear that women diagnosed early generally have a much better prognosis than those diagnosed in later stages.

Mammograms have long been considered the first line of defense in early diagnosis. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent volunteer panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine, suggests that women ages 40 to 50 discuss the need for screening mammograms with their doctor and that those older than 50 receive a mammogram every two years; however, the ACS recommends annual mammograms starting at least by age 45 and continuing for at least 10 years, at which point women may consider switching to biennial mammograms, depending on risk factors.

\"appleton_wall.jpg\"

Catherine Appleton

Many physicians, including Dr. Catherine Appleton, chief of breast imaging and associate professor of radiology at Washington University in St. Louis, recommend annual mammograms starting at age 40. \u201cThis is\u00a0also the recommendation of the NCCN [National Comprehensive Cancer Network], of which Siteman Cancer Center is a member,\u201d Appleton says. \u201cImportantly, high-risk women, like those with a family history,\u00a0might need to begin screening before age 40 and undergo supplemental screening with breast MRI.\u201d She adds that the future holds more personalized and nuanced screening techniques that researchers are still developing.

Appleton recognizes the confusion caused by differing screening recommendations from various organizations and individual physicians. However, her stance is clear and firm: \u201cWhat women really should know is that\u00a0there is widespread agreement across groups. A woman can\u00a0minimize\u00a0her\u00a0risk of dying from breast cancer by getting a\u00a0yearly mammogram beginning at age 40.\u201d

\"Vaughan

Aislinn Vaughan

Alternative screening technologies continue to be debated in the medical industry. For example, thermal imaging has gained some attention, but Dr. Aislinn Vaughan, a fellowship-trained breast surgeon with SSM Health St. Louis, notes that the data to support it is sparse, and most breast fellowship-trained radiologists recommend against it due to the lack of evidence supporting its efficacy. Breast ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create images and can help differentiate between fluid-filled cysts and solid masses, does have some research support, but only as an adjunct to mammography. \u201cHowever, standard supplemental screening for high-risk women is a breast MRI with contrast, which has more data to support it and higher sensitivity than a screening breast ultrasound,\u201d she says. MRIs use radio waves and magnets to create very detailed pictures, and the contrast liquid is injected into a vein to increase the resulting visual detail even further.

Given that screening must be considered individually by a woman and her physician based on her specific risk factors and concerns, women can reduce their risk of ever being diagnosed through some basic lifestyle adjustments.

Achieving and maintaining a normal weight (typically considered a body mass index of 25 or less) through diet and regular exercise is the first step in decreasing breast cancer risk. \u201cWe also know that women who smoke have a higher risk for developing breast cancer than women who do not smoke, so that\u2019s yet another reason to encourage smoking cessation,\u201d Vaughan says. \u201cIn addition, women who drink more alcohol have a higher risk for developing breast cancer than women who consume less, which relates to alcohol\u2019s metabolism into estrogenlike compounds that stimulate breast cells. Thus, minimizing alcohol consumption is a reasonable consideration.\u201d

Because breast cancer risk increases with age, postmenopausal women also should talk with their physicians about the risks versus benefits of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT), which is associated with an increased overall risk of breast cancer with long-term use. \u201cAlternative options to the treatment of menopausal symptoms that don\u2019t increase breast cancer include the antidepressant Effexor for hot flashes, and topical ointments and lubricants for vaginal dryness,\u201d says Dr. Sarah Colwick, a breast surgeon with Mercy Clinic Breast Surgery. \u201cIf a woman can avoid hormone-replacement therapy or wean off of it, that\u2019s best in terms of breast cancer risk, but if a woman truly needs HRT, then my recommendation would be to limit use to less than five years.\u201d

If breast cancer is detected through screening or after finding an unusual breast lump, discharge or thickening, scientists are working on technologies that will help differentiate aggressive tumors from less-aggressive forms of breast cancer. \u201cThere is a lot of progress in tailoring treatment based on the characteristics of the particular cancer,\u201d Vaughan says. \u201cHowever, any invasive breast cancer can cause death, and very advanced cancers might not. It\u2019s a matter of looking at the potential benefit of the treatment on the risks of that particular cancer. Cancers that have a characteristic called \u2018Her-2 positive\u2019 have a higher risk of recurrence, but benefit significantly from chemotherapy drugs that are targeted to that characteristic. Most breast cancers are \u2018hormone positive\u2019 and benefit from five to 10 years of antihormonal therapy.\u201d

\u201cThe most important thing I can emphasize to patients is vigilance,\u201d Colwick adds. \u201cThis involves a healthy diet, smoking cessation, regular exercise and, above all, an annual screening mammogram. Patients are their own best advocate and can do the most for prevention and early detection of breast cancer.\u201d

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

Thousands of St. Louisans will be taking a walk on Oct. 22, and as they do so, they\u2019ll be Making Strides Against Breast Cancer.

Starting at 9 a.m. on Sat., Oct. 22, at Forest Park\u2019s Lower Muny Lot, teams and individuals will celebrate breast cancer survivors and support those struggling with the disease during the noncompetitive 5K and 1-mile fun walk hosted by the American Cancer Society and sponsored by Jim Butler Chevrolet.

If you haven\u2019t registered online at makingstrides.acsevents.org, you can register in person starting at 7:30 a.m. Contributions to support the American Cancer Society\u2019s breast cancer initiatives can be made by cash, check or credit card.

\"Colwick_Sarah

Sarah Colwick

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Steffi blouse, $189, Rungolee (rungolee.com); Diane von Furstenberg pants, $298, Vie; Christian Louboutin shoes, $695, Neiman Marcus; Peepers eyeglasses, $22, Shine Boutique","byline":"","hireswidth":1177,"hiresheight":1761,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a858fb59-f5a3-5f95-af60-17437e295c51/5808e713ded47.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"508","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a858fb59-f5a3-5f95-af60-17437e295c51/5808e713dce5f.image.jpg?resize=508%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a858fb59-f5a3-5f95-af60-17437e295c51/5808e713dce5f.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"449","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a858fb59-f5a3-5f95-af60-17437e295c51/5808e713dce5f.image.jpg?resize=300%2C449"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1532","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/85/a858fb59-f5a3-5f95-af60-17437e295c51/5808e713dce5f.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1532"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"4c686431-e16b-57ab-845f-e53d9bfe8872","body":"

Earn top marks in style this fall with these looks inspired by geek chic \u2013 and shot on location at one of our favorite spots in town, the St. Louis Public Library\u2019s HQ.

A buttoned-up look is \u201cfirst in class\u201d for fall. Whether it be a \u201940s-inspired dress, a tie-neck blouse or head-to-toe plaid, studies show librarian chic gets an A+.

Ladue News wishes to thank:

Model Ali Turner with West Model Management

Hair stylist and makeup artist Brady Keenan

Shot on location at the St. Louis Public Library\u2019s headquarters Downtown

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Some of St. Louis\u2019 most creative and celebrated interior designers are transforming 12 spaces inside the 2016 Ladue News Show House at 4388 Westminster Place, a historic property built in 1897 in the Central West End. The following previews share a behind-the-scenes look at three rooms in the Show House \u2013 the living room, the dining room, and the entry foyer, staircase landing and first-floor landing \u2013 and the designers\u2019 visions and plans for them. The Show House will celebrate its preview party next Thursday, Oct. 20, and will open to the public on Oct. 22.

Pick up the Oct. 21, Oct. 28 and Nov. 4 issues of Ladue News for the remaining room previews in advance of the Show House\u2019s big reveal in the Nov. 11 issue. To learn more about the Show House or to buy tickets for general admission to the Show House, click here.

\"Foyer_Staircase_Landing.JPG\"
Foyer_Staircase_Landing.JPG
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Maria Lesko, left, and Channing Glover

Entry Foyer, Staircase Landing and First-Floor Landing

Designers: Channing Glover and Maria Lesko of C&M Interiors

The wide-entry foyer turned out to be the perfect blank slate for designers Channing Glover and Maria Lesko at C&M Interiors, with its stunning original floor-to-ceiling mirror reflecting the grand staircase leading to a second-floor sitting area. Glover and Lesko transformed these transitional spaces by marrying traditional elements \u2013 such as an ultra-utilitarian antique first-floor settee \u2013 with their signature contemporary aesthetic. \u201cWe\u2019re incorporating interesting color palettes \u2013 really bold red, green, black and different shades of gray,\u201d Lesko says. \u201cWe\u2019re trying to incorporate a little traditional design while keeping it contemporary with certain pieces.\u201d

C&M Interiors, 314-920-3020, candmstudio.com

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Living Room.JPG
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Vicki Dreste

Living Room

Designer: Vicki Dreste of Victoria Dreste Designs

Before even setting foot into the Show House this year, Vicki Dreste of Victoria Dreste Designs already had an idea of the design aesthetic she wanted to pursue \u2013 she just needed to find the perfect room to bring her vision to life. \u201cWhen I walked into the house and saw the living room, I knew that was the space for it,\u201d Dreste says. Rich natural light pouring in from the room\u2019s tall, front-facing windows allowed Dreste to use Havana Green, a deep, saturated teal, on the walls and Blazer, a dark blue, both from Sherwin-Williams\u2019 Victoria Dreste Signature Colors collection, which are available through Victoria Dreste Designs. These dark colors were the backdrop for lighter vanilla, cream, white and gold-toned furniture and accents throughout the room, which Dreste describes as a reimagining of the home\u2019s glory days and an update to the Victorian parlor space for today\u2019s style of living and entertaining.

Victoria Dreste Designs, 314-308-5759, victoriadreste.com

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Teddy Karl and Melissa Hummel

\"Dining
Dining Room.JPG

Dining Room

Designers: Teddy Karl and Melissa Hummel of The Great Cover-Up

At first glance, the home\u2019s grand dining room needed a mood shift as well as an update: Even with its dramatic windows, the space, according to The Great Cover-Up principal designer Teddy Karl, was dark and dreary. Karl and senior designer Melissa Hummel are known for their rich, traditional interiors, and they transformed the dining space with an Asian-inspired blue-and-white palette. \u201cWe wanted to see pattern-on-pattern in this space,\u201d Karl says. The biggest design challenge was the fireplace, which the designers felt was small for the room, but vases and urns adorning the mantel create height and add grandeur to the built-in feature.

The Great Cover-Up, 9708 Clayton Road, St. Louis, 314-995-5701, greatcoverupdesign.com

"}, {"id":"a616c36d-d3bb-5523-893e-170e27c76c0c","type":"article","starttime":"1476378000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-10-13T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1476824357","priority":45,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Tiki Time","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_a616c36d-d3bb-5523-893e-170e27c76c0c.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/tiki-time/article_a616c36d-d3bb-5523-893e-170e27c76c0c.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/tiki-time/article_a616c36d-d3bb-5523-893e-170e27c76c0c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Matt Sorrell","prologue":"Add a bit of South Pacific sun and fun to your fall with these three drinks incorporating pineapple rum.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["tiki","cocktail","joshua johnson","chase park plaza","kevin arndt","juniper","jacob rosenkoetter","taste"],"internalKeywords":["#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312","description":"","byline":"Photo by Sarah Conard","hireswidth":1755,"hiresheight":1180,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/c4/6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312/57ffb2cd84c4b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"511","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/c4/6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312/57ffb2cd82fc5.image.jpg?resize=760%2C511"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/c4/6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312/57ffb2cd82fc5.image.jpg?crop=1170%2C780%2C259%2C387&resize=100%2C67&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/c4/6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312/57ffb2cd82fc5.image.jpg?crop=1170%2C780%2C259%2C387&resize=300%2C200&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/c4/6c448f1e-a74a-5082-af68-7e280808a312/57ffb2cd82fc5.image.jpg?crop=1170%2C780%2C259%2C387&resize=1024%2C683&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"a616c36d-d3bb-5523-893e-170e27c76c0c","body":"
\"tiki
tiki cocktails

One of the best things to come out of the recent cocktail renaissance is the resurgence of tiki \u2013 that spirited, over-the-top celebration of all things tropical. The movement, which would eventually be named tiki for the totems prevalent on South Pacific islands, began in the 1930s in large part thanks to the work of two visionaries: Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt (who later took the name Donn Beach) and Victor Jules Bergeron.

Gantt was born in Texas but traveled widely as a young man before finally putting down roots in Los Angeles in the early 1930s. Eventually, he opened a small caf\u00e9, decorating it with all sorts of tropical artifacts he\u2019d acquired in his travels, and called it Don\u2019s Beachcomber Cafe. Gantt left for the West Coast after some time to spread the gospel of tiki in Hawaii.

Meanwhile, Bergeron had opened a small bar called Hinky Dinks in Oakland, California, at roughly the same time Gantt opened his spot. Bergeron decided to travel a bit to gain inspiration for his place and spent time soaking up the atmosphere (and drinks) in places like New Orleans and Havana, Cuba. But he got really fired up when he discovered Don\u2019s Beachcomber Cafe just up the road. He went back to Oakland with visions of rum and palm trees and subsequently opened the first Trader Vic\u2019s in the late 1930s; by the end of the 1960s, some 25 Trader Vic\u2019s locations dotted the country.

By the end of the 1960s, though, the tiki craze was waning. National tastes were changing. Vodka gained favor over rum, and premixed ingredients were being chosen over fresh juices. Many of the so-called tiki places that sprang up didn\u2019t have the attention to detail and quality food and drink that Don\u2019s Beachcomber Cafe and Trader Vic\u2019s were famous for. These summarily diluted the trend and were considered tired and kitschy. Thankfully, tiki once again is enjoying an upswing, with joints like Three Dots and a Dash in Chicago and Latitude 29 in NOLA, among many others, helping to usher in a new age of tiki. Local watering holes like Taste, The Libertine, Retreat Gastropub and Planter\u2019s House continue to offer tiki drinks that adhere to the tradition, as well.

Although other spirits make appearances in tiki concoctions, rum is definitely king in that realm. A new offering really ups the ante for those looking to bolster classic drinks or create new ones: Plantation Pineapple Rum. This spirit is big and rich, with hints of baking spices; the pineapple\u2019s definitely there, but well-balanced as a subtle part of the overall flavor of the rum, not a dominant note.

The spirit was created by Plantation\u2019s cellar master, Alexandre Gabriel, and renowned cocktail historian David Wondrich. It was originally made as a one-off project, intended to be passed around to friends at Tales of the Cocktail festival series in New Orleans a couple of years ago \u2013 but folks began clamoring for it to be officially released to the general public. So after a brief hiatus, it\u2019s finally returned to shelves and backbars across town.

Plantation Pineapple Rum tastes perfectly at home by itself in a glass with an ice cube or two, and it makes a pretty fabulous daiquiri, as well. But its flavor profile lends itself to all sorts of mixing \u2013 and not just tiki-inspired libations. The following three cocktails from some of the best mixologists in town use the rum in unique and unexpected ways.

Tandem Tiki Tomes

Those who\u2019d like to delve further into the world of tiki should seek these two recent books, consulted often in researching this story:

Beachbum Berry\u2019s Potions of the Caribbean by Jeff Berry

Smuggler\u2019s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum and the Cult of Tiki by Martin Cate with Rebecca Cate

--------------------------------------------------------

Caught in the Undertow

Recipe by Joshua Johnson, beverage manager, The Chase Park Plaza.

Serves | 1 |

| Preparation | In a cocktail mixer, add all ingredients and shake well with crushed ice. Pour all contents in a pilsner glass. Add more crushed ice if needed.

--------------------------------------------------------

Across the Pacific

Recipe by Kevin Arndt, bar manager, Juniper.

Serves | 1 |

| Preparation | In a cocktail mixer, shake all ingredients with ice. Strain into an iced rocks glass.

--------------------------------------------------------

Sazeracs on Racks

Recipe by Jacob Rosenkoetter, bartender, Taste

Serves | 1 |

| Preparation | Stir rum, simple syrup and bitters with ice. Strain into an absinthe-rinsed rocks glass.

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\u201cEasy as pi.\u201d \u201cCactus makes perfect.\u201d \u201cAnything\u2019s popsicle.\u201d \u201cI got your back \u2026 pack.\u201d Jen Shank has been told time and again she speaks in puns. And in recent years, those witty phrases have made their way onto her free-spirited line of handmade children\u2019s clothing: Swanky Shank.

As a youngster, Shank channeled her creativity into a variety of media, from sewing, paper-crafting, painting and stamping to photography and writing \u2013 and even cutting the hair of her Barbie doll and furry cat. As she grew up and became a preschool teacher, she never lost her self-described \u201cchildlike imagination.\u201d In 2006, her daughter was born \u2013 and just a few years later, so was the idea for Swanky Shank. \u201cThe creative force burst the levees,\u201d she says, explaining that her baby became a cute new canvas for all of her artsy creations.

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CP6A4747.jpg

Swanky Shank, which officially launched in 2011, offers one-of-a-kind pieces that parents can\u2019t find in big-box stores, Shank notes. Amid an adorably decorated design studio in Ellisville, where canvases of swanky models cover the walls and music blasts in the background, Shank says she is constantly coming up with new pieces to add to her line for girls and boys \u2013 from babies through size 8.

\u201cWe have taco Tuesdays and love to laugh as we sew, dye, cut and create,\u201d she says. \u201cMy kiddos [10-year-old Cesilia and 7-year-old Ollie] pop in and out and have been known to create their own little masterpieces alongside us \u2013 and they love modeling their mom\u2019s clothes!\u201d

Many of Swanky Shank\u2019s T-shirts, long-sleeved shirts, tank tops, bodysuits, skirts, pants, hats and onesies are hand-dyed, hand-stamped and hand-cut from rare fabrics like duck canvas, with unexpected embellishments such as bows, frills, fringe, flowers, elbow and knee patches, and custom stamping. \u201cWe also love buying designer fabrics on spoonflower.com, and we nab vintage fabrics whenever we find them,\u201d Shank says. \u201cWe try not to use too common of fabrics so we can stay unique and free-spirited like we love.\u201d

Shank keeps the clothing modern with a vintage twist by mixing quirky colors, whimsical illustrations and comical typography. \u201cWhether I am hiking with my family or attending a live performance at the Fox Theatre, I\u2019m always inspired by colors and beauty,\u201d she says. \u201cI love pairing unusual colors like mint and burgundy.\u201d

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CP6A4674.jpg

Just in time for fall, the line showcases shirts that say \u201cPump king,\u201d featuring a pumpkin, or \u201cYou\u2019re my boo,\u201d with a ghost. For the holiday season, kids\u2019 tops range from \u201cA plateful of grateful\u201d featuring a plate and silverware to \u201cAll about that baste,\u201d with a turkey. The most popular piece, a \u201cHello, my name is\u201d hand-dyed onesie, also still is being offered, along with tees referencing the child\u2019s age, including \u201c1 Month\u201d or sibling \u201cBig,\u201d \u201cMid\u201d and \u201cLil.\u201d There are even \u201cThing 1\u201d and \u201cThing 2\u201d onesies (inspired by The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss) available for twins. In addition to clothing, the line includes inspirational \u2013 and comical \u2013 notecards and magnets, with sayings such as \u201cA latte love.\u201d

Although the children\u2019s clothing line is based in St. Louis, it can be shipped across the country from swankyshank.com or purchased at dozens of boutiques throughout the nation, mostly in the Midwest. \u201cA common reaction I often hear is \u2018I wish I would have found y\u2019all sooner!\u2019\u201d Shank says. \u201c[That] makes my day every time.\u201d

Shank says her small business is doubling sales each year, and the staff also has expanded to six \u2013 not only to keep up with a growing waitlist for items but also to add new pieces to the line each month and contribute to the charitable cause The Gold Hope Project, which provides free portrait sessions to children battling cancer. \u201cNo matter how large we grow, we will always deliver the handmade touch \u2013 because that\u2019s who we are,\u201d Shank notes.

As she works on new holiday-related designs, Shank always keeps in mind the kids who will be wearing her fresh, fun threads. \u201cIt is such an amazing thing to connect with sweet moms across the world [who] trust me with making a one-of-a-kind piece for their most precious people, and that is such an honor,\u201d Shank says. \u201cI get to sell my art, but I also get to participate in life stories by sending personalized gifts to loved ones, decorating for baby showers and \u2018swankifying\u2019 people\u2019s lives. That fills me with gratitude.\u201d

Swanky Shank, swankyshank.com

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With a son with a disability, she knew the dog would have to be pretty special to fit into their family.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["happily ever after","stray rescue","stolie"],"internalKeywords":["#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb","description":"","byline":"Photo by Sarah Conard","hireswidth":1387,"hiresheight":1493,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb/57f57bdfa4b45.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"706","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb/57f57bdfa2c9e.image.jpg?resize=706%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb/57f57bdfa2c9e.image.jpg?crop=1379%2C925%2C2%2C67&resize=100%2C67&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb/57f57bdfa2c9e.image.jpg?crop=1379%2C925%2C2%2C67&resize=300%2C201&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"687","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d947ed3-e896-5cfa-b6c4-da9b3e83aebb/57f57bdfa2c9e.image.jpg?crop=1379%2C925%2C2%2C67&resize=1024%2C687&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35","description":"","byline":"Photo by Sarah Conard","hireswidth":1678,"hiresheight":1235,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/06/006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35/57ffaf0c94489.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"559","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/06/006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35/57ffaf0c92545.image.jpg?resize=760%2C559"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"74","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/06/006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35/57ffaf0c92545.image.jpg?resize=100%2C74"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"221","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/06/006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35/57ffaf0c92545.image.jpg?resize=300%2C221"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"754","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/06/006a910f-bf79-5bb1-9056-33ceb1661a35/57ffaf0c92545.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C754"}}},{"id":"fe183e0a-35e9-5339-b0df-e4738bc67fb3","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"620","height":"170","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/e1/fe183e0a-35e9-5339-b0df-e4738bc67fb3/57f66770832de.image.jpg?resize=620%2C170"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"27","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/e1/fe183e0a-35e9-5339-b0df-e4738bc67fb3/5228c023d5728.preview-100.jpg"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"82","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/e1/fe183e0a-35e9-5339-b0df-e4738bc67fb3/5228c023d816f.preview-300.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"281","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/e1/fe183e0a-35e9-5339-b0df-e4738bc67fb3/57f66770832de.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"3429ea8e-2a63-5489-8e3f-a4fcb7fb22d0","body":"
\"Urda\"
Urda

Once upon a time, Emily Urda was looking for a family dog for her household. With a son with a disability, she knew the dog would have to be pretty special to fit into their family. She went to Stray Rescue of St. Louis to see if she could find one that would be a good addition to the family. While she was there, she spoke with adoption manager Valerie Strobo about service dogs. Urda had considered this option in years prior, but everything had been thousands of dollars, or her son Jackson was too young for the dog.

\u201cThen I met Stolie,\u201d she says. \u201cShe seemed like she\u2019d be a great fit for our family, so we decided to go for it.\u201d

Stolie was rescued by Stray Rescue in February and was enrolled in the Missouri Puppies for Parole program. The 2-year-old female terrier mix learned basic obedience at Missouri Eastern Correctional Center and received full training. Stolie knows \u201csit,\u201d \u201cstay\u201d and \u201ccome,\u201d along with being housebroken and walking great on a leash.

Urda has only had Stolie for about a month, but she says the dog\u2019s been an exceptional addition to the family.

\u201cIt\u2019s been so nice to see Jackson interact with her,\u201d she says. \u201cWith his disability, he\u2019s not really interactive with other kids and would rather be with adults. Now, he and Stolie are friends. It\u2019s so sweet to see them together.\u201d

One of the things they\u2019ve been working on with Stolie\u2019s training is a hide-and-seek-type game where Jackson hides and Stolie has to find him.

\u201cIt\u2019s so entertaining because he\u2019s not very good at hiding, but she\u2019s very good at finding him,\u201d Urda says.

Aside from her time with Jackson, Stolie enjoys hunting frogs outside and playing fetch with her ball. After Jackson\u2019s asleep, she\u2019ll curl up on Urda\u2019s lap.

\u201cShe\u2019s probably around 70 pounds, but she\u2019ll do whatever she can to get in your lap,\u201d Urda says. \u201cShe climbed over the armrest yesterday to get into my lap.\u201d

Urda is still in the process of getting Stolie trained to meet Jackson\u2019s needs, but \u201cshe\u2019s as sweet as can be.\u201d She says it took Jackson a few days to warm up to Stolie, but the dog is already very protective of the family.

\u201cStray Rescue has just been so helpful with this whole process,\u201d Urda says. \u201cThey\u2019ve always been there right away to help. They did a great job of finding the perfect dog for our family.\u201d

For your own fairy-tail ending\u2026

Stray Rescue of St. Louis

2320 Pine St., St. Louis

314-771-6121, strayrescue.org

\"hea_urda01\"
hea_urda01

Proudly sponsored by Carol House Furniture

With their belief that bigger things can come out of selling furniture, Carol House and the Dubmans proudly donate a portion of each sale to local charities. One of the organizations the company supports is its very own Carol House QUICK FIX Pet Clinic, which spays and neuters pets for low-income families. For more information, call 314-771-PETS or visit CarolHousePetClinic.org.

\"Carol
Carol House Logo
"}, {"id":"0a84c76f-601b-51c7-9e03-0f363bca2350","type":"article","starttime":"1476378000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-10-13T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1478637487","priority":40,"sections":[{"the-daily":"the-daily"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Test Drive: 2017 Jaguar F Type-R","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/the-daily/article_0a84c76f-601b-51c7-9e03-0f363bca2350.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/the-daily/test-drive-jaguar-f-type-r/article_0a84c76f-601b-51c7-9e03-0f363bca2350.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/the-daily/test-drive-jaguar-f-type-r/article_0a84c76f-601b-51c7-9e03-0f363bca2350.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Ryan Scott","prologue":"This fast cat has both attitude and table manners.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["test drive","jaguar"],"internalKeywords":["#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81","description":"","byline":"Photo by Ryan Scott","hireswidth":1769,"hiresheight":1171,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d3/0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81/57ffafc71824d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"503","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d3/0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81/57ffafc7163eb.image.jpg?resize=760%2C503"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d3/0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81/57ffafc7163eb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d3/0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81/57ffafc7163eb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"678","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d3/0d39a9b7-6ddc-59e1-be4a-1bef034f9d81/57ffafc7163eb.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C678"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"0a84c76f-601b-51c7-9e03-0f363bca2350","body":"
\"101416
101416 test drive

\u201cBeautiful car \u2013 what is it?\u201d

That query greeted me with predictable frequency in parking lots around St. Louis while I was driving Jaguar\u2019s supercar. My answer typically prompted a confused look. \u201cJaguar, huh?\u201d The usual suspects of 12-year-old boys\u2019 bedroom posters are Porsches or Corvettes, and having driven those cars through the same city streets, I can testify this Jaguar snaps heads. (You\u2019re welcome, chiropractors.)

I admit I\u2019m a sucker for a pretty face, and this mean cat has one of the most attractive you\u2019ll see. From every angle, the sculpted sheet metal flows in a way that perfectly integrates aggression with elegance. Corvettes and Porsche 911s are beautiful cars in their own right, but by contrast, the F-Type\u2019s form makes the \u2019vette look confused and the 911 look blas\u00e9 \u2013 at least in the opinion of this humble reviewer. However, poetry in motion has been a hallmark of Jaguar since World War II, and with automotive-design superstar Ian Callum now at the helm, anything less would have ranked as a failure.

After driving the supercharged V-6 version of the F-Type for LN\u2019s convertibles buyers guide in May, I commented at length about the nonstop entertaining hilarity that exits its quad tailpipes. If that version turned the wick to 10, this V-8 goes seriously Spinal Tap and cranks it to 11. The F-Type grabs attention visually and demands it audibly. The spitting, snarling, popping chorus proves positively addictive. Even though it can be tamed with an active shutter valve in the exhaust, why would you ever do that? Much of my time driving the Jag passed looking for bridge overpasses and parking garages and then giggling as pedestrians dove for cover, thinking the New Madrid fault had just let loose.

No doubt, the name of the game with the F-Type is entertainment. With its looks, 550 horsepower on tap and never-ending soundtrack, this beast wasn\u2019t created to blend in at the Starbucks drive-through \u2013 it\u2019s a car for extroverts. It doesn\u2019t just involve getting noticed, though. The F-Type also delivers a thoroughly well-rounded driving experience. All necessary boxes were checked during the design and development of this car, and it delivers the performance goods expected in its category. When running a gauntlet of Jefferson County 20-mph switchbacks, the F-Type responded with precision and eagerness. Higher-speed sweepers showed this car\u2019s impressive ultimate lateral grip and confidence-inspiring stability. The F-Type will go exactly where you point it \u2013 but, alas, without much feel of what\u2019s being rolled over, as is the case with almost everything these days. Its massive brakes, reminiscent of manhole covers, proved unflappable in hard use.

Straight-line performance is, well, ample. Zero to 60 in 3.7 seconds would feel fast inside a bank vault, but to do it with that beautiful cacophony to your aft and the wind through your hair feels blistering. Gut-whacking thrust is delivered in any gear, and I\u2019m happy to say that reports of coronary-inducing, tail-happy personalities are greatly controlled thanks to the new all-wheel-drive system. In fact, even with the traction control deactivated, it took a concerted effort to scare myself. Look everywhere, and you\u2019ll see manufacturers employing the ZF eight-speed automatic transmission the F-Type includes, as well. But as it\u2019s highly computer-controlled, ultimate success or failure depends on the sequence of 1s and 0s entered into its brain. The F-Type has a fast, smooth and ultraresponsive ZF cog.

Just a glimpse reveals the F-Type to be fast \u2013 of course it is. But perhaps the biggest surprise? This cat also has exquisite table manners. Put the top up, and you\u2019ll quickly forget its alter ego as the cabin volume drops to Zen-inducing levels. Take the suspension out of sport (dynamic) mode, and the ride becomes compliant and supple. The seats feel livable for long periods \u2013 perfect for extended road trips, assuming you pack light.

The Jaguar F-Type R ranks as a brilliant car but finds itself in a room full of showstoppers. The honest truth is that it\u2019s no \u201cbetter\u201d than its competitors, the Porsche 911 and Corvette. It doesn\u2019t need to be, though; better in such rarified company represents a numbers game. Do you really care if it does 0 to 60 in 3.5 instead of 3.7? Does it matter if it pulls 1.02 Gs on a skidpad instead of 0.98 G? No. Rather, how the F-Type does those things \u2013 with a sly grin on its figurative face \u2013 leaves the lasting impression. In my opinion, Jaguar engineers made the right decision in sacrificing those last few percentage points of performance numbers in favor of pure entertainment. So successful is the complete package that even in the aforementioned rarified company, if I had roughly $100,000 burning a hole in my pocket, I\u2019d need only decide how to configure my F-Type.

To learn more about the 2017 Jaguar F-Type R, visit plazajaguarstlouis.com.

History of the F-Type:

Topics of fashion and design involve a consensus roughly as often as Texans and Californians agree on a President. Ask a group of automotive \u201cexperts\u201d for their top 10 most beautiful cars of all time, and you\u2019ll see a lot of different names on the lists. But one car sure to be near the top of the list from any expert worth his or her salt is the Jaguar E-Type. Consider this: New York City\u2019s Museum of Modern Art displays just six autos, one being a dark-blue E-Type roadster. Some have suggested the E-Type\u2019s near-perfect proportions and seductive, flowing organic shape happened by accident because its designer, Malcom Sayer, used mathematical principles searching for aerodynamic efficiency. Whether through luck or genius, the results remain undeniable \u2013 so much so that Ferrari boss Enzo Ferrari proclaimed the E-Type \u201cthe most beautiful car ever made\u201d (equivalent to Jimi Hendrix calling you the best guitarist of all time).

Looks alone didn\u2019t lead the E-Type to become as synonymous with the \u201960s as the Beatles; its cutting-edge engineering also ranked as a deciding factor. Things like four-wheel disc brakes, front and rear independent suspension, rack-and-pinion steering and a monocoque body all set it apart. And the 3.8-liter, straight-six engine making 265 horsepower propelled the E-type to 150 mph, making it the fastest production car in the world. Hollywood icons like Steve McQueen, Brigitte Bardot and Tony Curtis all owned E-Types.

Pictured is the pristine \u201965 E-Type owned by Jim and Lisa Hendrix, longtime Jaguar aficionados. This car \u2013 in the family for nine years \u2013 came with a factory-leather interior and wool carpeting. The first year for the larger displacement, 4.2-liter motor was 1965. The Hendrixs purchased the car when a friend and local Jaguar club member passed away. On first inspection, the family fell in love, and it\u2019s remained in their care since. Despite being showroom-fresh with immaculate paintwork, it\u2019s no trailer queen \u2013 expect to see it on St. Louis roads during nice weather. Maintenance involves a family affair, with Jim and son Ben overseeing mechanical and paint issues and Lisa keeping the interior spotless.

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\"matt's
matt's hats

At just 9 years old, Matthew Williams received a shocking diagnosis: a stage 3 ependymoma, a variety of brain tumor. After undergoing an eight-hour surgery to remove the golf ball-sized cancer mass and three months of radiation treatments that caused Williams to lose his hair, he began collecting hats to wear to hide his baldness.

Despite his young age in 2006, Williams was wise beyond his years: He had the foresight and compassion to realize fellow kids going through cancer treatment also could use a helping hand \u2013 and a hat. That\u2019s when Williams decided to share his ever-growing collection of a few dozen hats with other kids who also were stricken with the disease. Soon, through the donations of family and friends, he met his goal of gathering 1,000 hats to sell to raise funds for childhood cancer research.

A decade later, Williams is a cancer-free Missouri Baptist University student continuing to expand his nonprofit, Matt\u2019s Hats, which began in 2011 and was officially incorporated in July 2013, to support kids with cancer and advance pediatric cancer research.

In its humble beginning, Matt\u2019s Hats would set up a small booth at local fairs and festivals, and sell hats from Williams\u2019 donated collection for $5 or more. \u201cThis would encourage people not only to buy hats and donate but also to give more hats to me to continue selling,\u201d he recalls.

But when Williams moved from his hometown in southern Illinois to Creve Coeur for college, he thought about dissolving Matt\u2019s Hats. After word of the charity quickly spread through social media in St. Louis, though, Matt\u2019s Hats experienced a successful rebirth in July.

Today, the organization has a small, passionate staff of five and a slate of programs including the Hat Box program and school hat days. Through the Hat Box program, set to launch next year, every $5 donated to Matt\u2019s Hats means a hat is delivered to a kid with cancer at the children\u2019s hospital of the donor\u2019s choice. And the nonprofit also is using schools\u2019 hat days to garner even more hat and monetary donations \u2013 students pay $1 to wear a hat to school, and at the end of the day, they can choose to donate their hats.

Matt\u2019s Hats also is expanding its cause through conference presentations. Williams has shared his childhood cancer journey and the mission of his charity with educators at events such as the national conference for CharacterPlus, a St. Louis-based organization supporting student success through character development, and the biannual convention of Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, a professional honor society of key women educators in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Latin America and Japan. \u201cIt\u2019s a good way to tell our story and our mission to different educators from all over the states,\u201d Williams says. \u201cWe hope to continue to present our message and mission to educators at different conferences.\u201d

The charity\u2019s primary source of outreach is social media, and people can learn through its online sites how to donate funds for cancer research or give a hat to a child with the disease. \u201cWe encourage people to like and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, and visit mattshats.org and share our video, The Opportunity,\u201d Williams says, adding that the organization also is working to build corporate partnerships.

To date, Matt\u2019s Hats has given away some 1,000 hats and raised about $15,000 for the pediatric cancer research of Washington University Physicians at St. Louis Children\u2019s Hospital. \u201cWe hope to expand to other hospitals and other research facilities as the funds become available,\u201d Williams adds.

With a mission of turning tragedy into opportunity, the Matt\u2019s Hats staff is constantly being moved by the stories of the kids the charity helps. \u201cIn one instance, we gave a hat to a child, and a picture of the child wearing the hat we gave her was featured on Good Morning America,\u201d Williams recalls. \u201cAnd we often receive messages from patients and people who not only are touched by the gift of a hat but the nature of our giving.\u201d

Williams believes a crisis like a cancer diagnosis means both opportunity and tragedy \u2013 and at Matt\u2019s Hats, the focus is on the opportunity to reach out to kids with cancer, as well as facilitate a connection between young patients to lessen the burden of battling the disease.

\u201cThe chance to help others is close to all of our hearts,\u201d he notes. \u201cBut the opportunity to look a child in the face and offer hope \u2013 having already been there myself \u2013 is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.\u201d

Matt\u2019s Hats, 618-759-3004, mattshats.org, facebook.com/mattshatscorp

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4 - Matt Williams of Matt's Hats 2.jpg
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\"madco\"

Modern American Dance Company members, from left, Claire Hilleren, Monica Meyr, Nicole Whitesell, and Lindsay Hawkins rehearse \"Crimson Momentum.\"

MADCO!

The mere moniker of the Modern American Dance Company suggests its collective continuing exuberance, even as the troupe celebrates the ruby anniversary of its founding.

Between trips to New York and Wisconsin, Stacy West, MADCO\u2019s longtime artistic and executive director, effuses about its \u201ccontinued commitment to dance performed to live music.\u201d That 40-year-old commitment officially commences with an event a week hence \u2013 synchronistically in company with another local group celebrating its own 25th anniversary.

\u201cInvitation to Dance features a collaboration with the world-class Arianna String Quartet,\u201d West says. \u201cWe are both in residence at the [University of Missouri-St. Louis\u2019] Touhill Performing Arts Center, and this is the first time we have performed a full evening concert together.\u00a0\u2026 The show is designed to include the audience and thank those who have supported us for all these years.\u201d

Regarding that Oct. 14 and 15 event, she continues: \u201cFriday- and Saturday-evening audiences should come at 7 p.m. to enjoy a complimentary ballroom dance lesson provided by [Des Peres terpsichorean instructors] Prestige Ballroom. Enjoy the performance, and finish off the evening with drinks, anniversary cake and a chance to dance the night away in a casual setting alongside the performers after the show.

\u201cThis is all included in the regular ticket price because we want people not only to watch dance but to dance themselves!\u201d

MADCO, West notes, still comprises Elyse Andersen, Belicia Beck, Lindsay Hawkins, Claire Hilleren, Darrell V. Hyche II, Monica Meyr, Jeff Mitchell, apprentice Daryon Kent and rehearsal director Nicole Whitesell. Joining the troupe\u2019s roster this season is apprentice Natalie Williams.

More than eight decades ago, iconic dancer and choreographer Martha Graham defined the function of American dance thus: \u201cWe look at the dance to impart the sensation of living in an affirmation of life, to energize the spectator into keener awareness of the vigor, the mystery, the humor, the variety and the wonder of life.\u201d

West pauses to reflect on the functional uplift of her chosen art form \u2013 especially for a troupe founded amid the halcyon optimism of the U.S. Bicentennial.

\u201cIn many ways, we have stayed true to the vision of the founders, Alcine Wiltz and Ross Winter,\u201d she says. \u201cThe first year of operation, the company only did education programs while they were developing repertory for main-stage performances. Back then, education programs were in the form of lecture demonstrations and master classes. Schools welcomed performances as \u2018enrichment.\u2019 Audiences went to the theater, watched the performance and went home.

\u201cToday, both entertainment and education are woven into everything we do, from the classroom to the main stage, on tour and in the community. We talk more about audience engagement and curriculum-related art with a community impact. We accomplish this by choosing to perform work that uses dance to shed light and give a voice to bigger topics. And we invite audiences to participate in pre- and post-show events that help them get a deeper understanding of the projects we are presenting.\u201d

West joined MADCO a dozen years after its founding for a simple but elegant reason. \u201cWhat originally drew me to the company is what has kept me here for 28 years: the diversity of the repertoire and the quality of the dancers,\u201d she says.

With pardonable pride, she continues by citing some impressive metrics and other laurels.

\u201cIn 40 years, MADCO has reached 1.2 million people; educated 600,000 students; appeared in over 3,000 performances, classes and community events; employed over 2,600 artists; and commissioned 300 new works,\u201d West says.

The troupe also has earned such accolades as two regional Emmy Awards and an international Telly Award, honoring the finest film and video productions; groundbreaking web commercials, videos and films; and outstanding local, regional and cable TV commercials and programs.

\u201cI am honored to have been named the 2016 St. Louis Visionary Artist Awardee for Outstanding Arts Educator,\u201d she continues, referencing a laurel founded in 2003 by Grand Center and \u201cnow presented by an independent committee of women dedicated to promoting the arts in St. Louis,\u201d according to its website.

\u201cThese are remarkable accomplishments for any arts organization in the country,\u201d West says. \u201cI\u2019m proud to be doing it all from St. Louis!\u201d

Predictably, in an era wherein the bottom line has become the abiding line in the sand, West cites it as MADCO\u2019s biggest challenge. \u201cWe have so many things we want to accomplish,\u201d she muses, \u201cand competing for limited funding for the arts is usually what stands in our way.\u201d

Since becoming the troupe\u2019s artistic director in 1994, West has battled such budgetary challenges regularly and passionately.

\u201cI have focused on bringing the best choreographers and collaborators to the company that I can,\u201d she says. \u201cI\u2019m really proud of the outcome of some of these collaborations. My pride goes beyond the great dances they have produced. I\u2019m most affected by how they contribute to the growth of every artist they touch and for the experiences they give to our audiences.

\u201cA few examples are Veza, a piece that helped tell the stories of some of the 50,000 Bosnians living in St. Louis; Seven, a work inspired by [local track-and-field Olympian] Jackie Joyner-Kersee; and Liquid Roads, a full-length production of live music and dance that honors the history of the people and music along the Mississippi River.

\u201cLiquid Roads is now touring nationally. I\u2019m also proud of our dance-residency program, Books in Motion, which encourages reading and reaches around 12,000 students and their families annually.\u201d

Beyond the Invitation to Dance opener, West effuses about making MADCO\u2019s 2016-17 season memorable for its audiences and its artists alike.

\u201cOn Oct. 15 at 2 p.m., we will offer our first sensory-friendly performance, generously underwritten by the Centene Corp.,\u201d she says. \u201cThe performances remain mostly the same with some modifications in sound, lighting and seating to create a supportive and welcoming environment for people with disabilities. Matinee guests will also enjoy a chance to dance with the MADCO dancers in an anniversary-party setting complete with dessert.\u201d

With understandable prudence but unleavened enthusiasm, West looks even further ahead to MADCO\u2019s Freedom! event, inspired in no small measure by the racial tumult the metro area has suffered since 2014. That event will premiere March 31, whereafter MADCO will immediately begin adapting it into an educational program for 2017 and 2018.

\u201cIf I had one wish, it would be for every audience member to come with us on the entire journey of creation from day one through the performance,\u201d West says of Freedom!

\u201cFor the grand finale of the season, we have commissioned four renowned choreographers \u2013 Jennifer Archibald, Gina Patterson, Cecil Slaughter and Nejla Yatkin \u2013 to take on the task of creating four new works inspired by the national civil rights collection at Washington University\u2019s Olin libraries. We have started the research, but to be honest, we are at the stage where we are overwhelmed, excited, have too many ideas and no idea of the outcome.\u00a0\u2026

\u201cTo date, we have logged more than 60 hours looking at civil rights photos, listening to interviews from [the PBS documentary series] Eyes on the Prize and documentation of Ferguson. This has been followed up with dinners, drives and long walks to talk it out and contemplate how to take a topic about heinous human behavior that seems to repeat itself and turn it into a performance.

\u201cI wonder what would happen if more people could join us on the journey instead of meeting us at the final destination?\u201d

Gamely, even as the troupe celebrates turning 40, West also peers into her terpsichorean crystal ball regarding MADCO\u2019s 50th anniversary.

\u201cOur mission is to provide audiences with entertaining and innovative dance experiences,\u201d she declares. \u201cDance experiences is a key phrase, as we plan to continue using dance as a tool to help people deepen their knowledge of other things. Of course, audiences can still expect the entertaining style MADCO is known for. All of our work will be performed by world-class dancers and choreographers.\u201d

West foresees \u201cexciting new collaborations\u201d at the university and \u201cinnovative new programs for the future,\u201d especially in partnerships involving dance and science.

MADCO also continues to cultivate a passion for programs for people with disabilities, she says.

\u201cI recently became certified in Autism Movement Therapy,\u201d West says, referring to a nonprofit organization centered on serving the autism and special-needs community by providing both a structured movement-and-music program and advocacy and community outreach to foster understanding of that community globally.

Finally, she states, \u201cSt. Louis will always be home, but we look forward to continuing to broaden our national and international reputation with touring.\u201d

Almost a century ago, influential English intellectual Havelock Ellis characterized dance as the \u201cloftiest, the most moving, the most beautiful of the arts, because it is no mere translation or abstraction from life; it is life itself.\u201d

As MADCO celebrates its 40th anniversary, West and her troupe self-evidently remain committed to realizing Ellis\u2019 sentiment.

Modern American Dance Company, c/o University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1 University Blvd., 243 AAB, St. Louis, 314-341-5407, madcodance.com

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