[ {"id":"b701df7c-9208-11e5-8c1b-176a03e75e4b","type":"link","starttime":"1448300160","starttime_iso8601":"2015-11-23T11:36:00-06:00","application":"editorial","title":"Mari de Villa iPad","permalink":"http://www.maridevilla.com/","canonical":"http://www.maridevilla.com/","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"cbc8b20a-9208-11e5-8595-4387ad9bef70","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"728","height":"90","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bc/cbc8b20a-9208-11e5-8595-4387ad9bef70/56534ec7c9538.image.png?resize=728%2C90"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"12","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bc/cbc8b20a-9208-11e5-8595-4387ad9bef70/56534ec7c9538.image.png?resize=100%2C12"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"37","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bc/cbc8b20a-9208-11e5-8595-4387ad9bef70/56534ec7c9538.image.png?resize=300%2C37"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"127","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/bc/cbc8b20a-9208-11e5-8595-4387ad9bef70/56534ec7c9538.image.png"}}}],"revision":1,"url":"http://www.maridevilla.com/"}, {"id":"78d02e80-3f3a-11e7-a922-fbeb1b17625c","type":"article","starttime":"1495490580","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-22T17:03:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495491425","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'First Impressions' Pays Homage to Austen in Enchanting, Artistic Fashion: Theater Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_78d02e80-3f3a-11e7-a922-fbeb1b17625c.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/first-impressions-pays-homage-to-austen-in-enchanting-artistic-fashion/article_78d02e80-3f3a-11e7-a922-fbeb1b17625c.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/first-impressions-pays-homage-to-austen-in-enchanting-artistic-fashion/article_78d02e80-3f3a-11e7-a922-fbeb1b17625c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":7,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: Are you an aficionado of Jane Austen? In particular, are you a devotee of her classic novel, Pride and Prejudice? If so, what are your recollections of the \u201cfirst impressions\u201d made by Austen\u2019s novel upon you when you first read the 19th century masterpiece? Members of the Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble (SATE) performance team recount their own feelings and observations about the book \u2013 or in some cases whether they\u2019ve even read it \u2013 or its sundry\u00a0film\u00a0versions\u00a0in this adaptation that combines a tongue-in-cheek retelling of the tale with the myriad reflections of its cast.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["jane austen","pride and prejudice","first impressions","slightly askew theatre ensemble","sate","the chapel","rachel tibbetts","ellie schwetye","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3872,"hiresheight":2592,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/44/a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51/59235ec604f72.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"509","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/44/a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51/59235ec5f3469.image.jpg?resize=760%2C509"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/44/a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51/59235ec5f3469.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/44/a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51/59235ec5f3469.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"685","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/44/a444ae84-3f39-11e7-938d-13268ccffc51/59235ec5f3469.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C685"}}},{"id":"1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3872,"hiresheight":2385,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d5/1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d/59235f912a796.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"468","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d5/1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d/59235f9124ff0.image.jpg?resize=760%2C468"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"62","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d5/1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d/59235f9124ff0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C62"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"185","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d5/1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d/59235f9124ff0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C185"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"630","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/d5/1d5be512-3f3a-11e7-ae90-77940bb0633d/59235f9124ff0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C630"}}},{"id":"438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3743,"hiresheight":2437,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/38/438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31/59235fd13f53e.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"495","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/38/438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31/59235fd139ab9.image.jpg?resize=760%2C495"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/38/438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31/59235fd139ab9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/38/438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31/59235fd139ab9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C195"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"666","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/38/438e8186-3f3a-11e7-be01-93cb7fc3da31/59235fd139ab9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C666"}}},{"id":"664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3613,"hiresheight":2424,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/64/664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d/5923600b868d7.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"510","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/64/664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d/5923600b81a01.image.jpg?resize=760%2C510"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/64/664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d/5923600b81a01.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/64/664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d/5923600b81a01.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"687","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/64/664dedec-3f3a-11e7-8fbe-830ddbb7b94d/5923600b81a01.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C687"}}},{"id":"cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3872,"hiresheight":2592,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f/59235f0ba35cf.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"509","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f/59235f0b9e2b3.image.jpg?resize=760%2C509"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f/59235f0b9e2b3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f/59235f0b9e2b3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"685","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc8e2de-3f39-11e7-ab44-ffb61dcd472f/59235f0b9e2b3.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C685"}}},{"id":"f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3562,"hiresheight":2553,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/54/f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb/59235f4de156c.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"545","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/54/f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb/59235f4ddbb08.image.jpg?resize=760%2C545"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"72","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/54/f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb/59235f4ddbb08.image.jpg?resize=100%2C72"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"215","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/54/f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb/59235f4ddbb08.image.jpg?resize=300%2C215"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"734","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/54/f546173c-3f39-11e7-a7a4-f394f75054cb/59235f4ddbb08.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C734"}}},{"id":"7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":3872,"hiresheight":2450,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a0/7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94/59235e7f2d620.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"481","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a0/7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94/59235e7f27589.image.jpg?resize=760%2C481"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"63","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a0/7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94/59235e7f27589.image.jpg?resize=100%2C63"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"190","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a0/7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94/59235e7f27589.image.jpg?resize=300%2C190"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"648","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/a0/7a0c03ba-3f39-11e7-ac1e-7fd900697d94/59235e7f27589.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C648"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"78d02e80-3f3a-11e7-a922-fbeb1b17625c","body":"

Story: Are you an aficionado of Jane Austen? In particular, are you a devotee of her classic novel, Pride and Prejudice? If so, what are your recollections of the \u201cfirst impressions\u201d made by Austen\u2019s novel upon you when you first read the 19th century masterpiece?

Members of the Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble (SATE) performance team recount their own feelings and observations about the book \u2013 or in some cases whether they\u2019ve even read it \u2013 or its sundry\u00a0film\u00a0versions\u00a0in this adaptation that combines a tongue-in-cheek retelling of the tale with the myriad reflections of its cast.

Highlights: Conceived by SATE member Ellie Schwetye and company artistic director Rachel Tibbetts, First Impressions is a thoroughly delightful, enchanting and elegant foray into the refined world of Austen and her high-brow characters. The play\u2019s title comes from the ruminations of each member of the 12-person ensemble as well as from Austen\u2019s original title for her seminal work.

Other Info: Engaging from start to finish, the Schwetye/Tibbetts collaboration moves at a properly refined pace under Tibbetts\u2019 watchful direction, aided immensely by Schwetye\u2019s ingeniously crafted sound design which contributes chamber music pieces that could accompany a Masterpiece Theatre presentation as well as including classical send-ups to the likes of Journey\u2019s Any Way You Want It and a Mumford & Sons song. How can you not love that?

Asides to the audience uttered by the players range from the rhapsodic (Cara Barresi alluding to her mother\u2019s status as a college English professor) to the ribald (Nicole Angeli explaining her delight with the lust lurking beneath Mr. Darcy) to the affecting (John Wolbers). My personal favorite is Carl Overly, Jr.\u2019s as he wonders why so many elegant English novels ignore 99 percent of the world\u2019s population and restrict themselves to the quaint upper-crust denizens of the British Isles. He then\u00a0admits that\u00a0he relishes them, anyway.

The goings-on at the Bennet manse and in London take place under a billowing sheet that resembles an evangelical tent, brightly bedecked with strings of lights courtesy of lighting designer Bess Moynihan, who cleverly festoons her own scenic effort. Elizabeth Henning\u2019s costume design is an amusing amalgamation of stately period attire\u00a0with punk garb sported by George Wickham left over from a Mad Max movie.

The performers shine in their Austen roles, often playing it \u2018camp,\u2019 such as Andrew Kuhlman\u2019s exaggerated and infectiously humorous portrayal of the unappealing Rev. Williams Collins, who means to marry one of Mr. Bennet\u2019s five eligible daughters, even if they are his cousins.

Collins is spurned by his first choice, second-eldest but most likely smartest daughter Elizabeth (Schwetye), but rebounds quickly enough by convincing another cousin, the practical-minded Charlotte Lucas (Rachel Hanks), to take his offer of financial security, even if she doesn\u2019t love him.

Overly and Angeli offer an amusing contrast as the refined Mr. Bennet and his more worldly wife, who considers it her moral obligation and raison d\u2019etre to marry off their five daughters, preferably to men of means. Angeli also sparkles in a minor role as the haughty snob Lady Catherine De Bourgh.

Michael Cassidy Flynn is entertaining as the immature dandy Charles Bingley and also as the swashbuckling rogue, George Wickham, while Kristen Strom does polished work as Charles\u2019 imperious sister Caroline as well as\u00a0the gregarious Georgiana Darcy, Mr. Darcy\u2019s down-to-earth sister.

Hanks is convincing as the stoic and serious Charlotte, in fine contrast to the girlish antics of the two youngest Bennet sisters, Kitty (Jazmine K. Wade) and Lydia (Katy Keating), who stuns her parents by running off with the dashing Wickham.

Barresi and Parvuna Sulaiman are pleasing in their portrayals of sisters Jane and Mary, the former eager to fulfill the wishes of their mother and the latter content to defer her own happiness to that of other family members and with good spirit in doing so.

Schwetye makes for a superior Elizabeth, depicting the character\u2019s intelligence, charm and sophistication but also her feminist ability to hold out for what she wants rather than capitulate to the folly of a Collins or the hysteria of her mother. She shares a convincing chemistry with Wolbers, who plays the mysterious and somewhat haughty Mr. Darcy. Wolbers in turn offers a splendid look into the soul as well as the intellect of Darcy, first intrigued and later beguiled by Elizabeth\u2019s independence as well as her beauty.

Dialect coach Pamela Reckamp\u2019s efforts are received better by some performers than by others, but all of the players work delightfully on the enchanting dances that are staged under that billowing tent sheet. Tibbetts also blends the novel with the update in interesting fashion by often having players not performing sit on adjacent bleachers, where they knit, work crossword puzzles or rock out with their headphones.

The first impression of First Impressions is that Schwetye and Tibbetts have paid respectful homage to their heroine, both in adapting her work in SATE\u2019s \u201cSeason of Adaptation\u201d and also in shaping it such engaging artistic fashion.

Play: First Impressions

Company: Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble

Venue: The Chapel, 6238 Alexander Drive

Dates: May 24, 25, 26, 27

Tickets: $15-$20, plus \u201cPay What You Can\u201d on May 25; contact 827-5760, info@slightlyoff.org or brownpapertickets.com

Rating: A 4.5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Joey Rumpell

"}, {"id":"ead60bf3-89b9-5c8b-9aa0-f6dff7115b77","type":"article","starttime":"1495126800","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-18T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495135143","priority":45,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"\"Heart\" Ends in \u201cArt\u201d","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_ead60bf3-89b9-5c8b-9aa0-f6dff7115b77.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/heart-ends-in-art/article_ead60bf3-89b9-5c8b-9aa0-f6dff7115b77.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/heart-ends-in-art/article_ead60bf3-89b9-5c8b-9aa0-f6dff7115b77.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"A small new gallery in the Central West End greets art devotees. Linda Horsley opened Horsley Arts in April.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["art gallery","central west end","horsley arts","linda horsley"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922","description":"Visit our Facebook page on Monday, May 22 for more photos from this feature.","byline":"Photo by Sarah Conroy","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/b8/4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922/591dc48e0b799.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/b8/4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922/591dc48e09e4b.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/b8/4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922/591dc48e09e4b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/b8/4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922/591dc48e09e4b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/b8/4b854490-fb57-5151-b64a-6102ac722922/591dc48e09e4b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc","description":"Linda Horsley","byline":"Photo by Sarah Conroy","hireswidth":1226,"hiresheight":1690,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc/591dc48e694f0.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"551","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc/591dc48e68892.image.jpg?resize=551%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"138","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc/591dc48e68892.image.jpg?resize=100%2C138"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"414","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc/591dc48e68892.image.jpg?resize=300%2C414"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1412","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/51121ac5-669c-5fd2-acbd-500a14e9ccdc/591dc48e68892.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1412"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"ead60bf3-89b9-5c8b-9aa0-f6dff7115b77","body":"
\"horsley

Visit our Facebook page on Monday, May 22 for more photos from this feature.

For the St. Louis metro area, the online media company YP The Real Yellow Pages lists 235 \u201cArt Galleries, Dealers & Consultants\u201d \u2013 but early last month, it really ought to have upped by one that impressive total.

On April 7, St. Louis\u2019 Central West End neighborhood welcomed at 4374 Olive St. Horsley Arts, a small and quite selective gallery owned by artist Linda Horsley.

Horsley briefly explains what inspired her not only to open the by-appointment-only gallery but also to open it where she did.

\u201cThe charm of the Central West End has grown while I have been away in Seattle for the past 12 years teaching art and with family,\u201d she says. \u201cThe arts are active here. Three blocks west of me is the Atrium Gallery, and two blocks over are the chain of McPherson [Avenue] galleries.\u201d

Likewise, Horsley briefly distinguishes Horsley Arts from other galleries in the metro area in general and in the Central West End in particular.

\u201cThis smaller gallery remains unique, as it has an inviting quality,\u201d she says. \u201cPeople said it felt like a gathering of friends at the opening.

\u201cBuilt in 1910, it\u2019s now renovated with a public restroom on the first floor and modern seated fixtures, and it seems airy for a smaller exhibition space of 75 feet long and only 20 feet wide.\u201d

Reflecting the comparatively compact area of the gallery, its opening involved only two artists: Bill Christman (the creator of Beatnik Bob\u2019s Museum of Mystery Mirth and Mayhem in downtown St. Louis\u2019 City Museum) and Horsley herself.

In general, their oeuvres contrast tidily, with Christman\u2019s signmaking bona fides and sculptural fondness for primaries and visual impishness counterbalancing the desaturated palette and disquieting funhouse-mirror distortions of much of Horsley\u2019s portraiture.

\"horsley

Linda Horsley

The gallerist sketches her rationale for opening with Christman\u2019s works and her own.

\u201cThe center space was taken up with robots, lights, signs and metal sculptures by Bill that have some whimsy, which I believe mixed well with my work on canvas,\u201d Horsley says, adding that Christman also used the property\u2019s long backyard to display certain larger robots. \u201cThis gallery space gave him the opportunity to extract or isolate the sculptures.

\u201cEach of us has our own fantasy that mostly complements the other \u2013 \u2018state of playfulness.\u2019 The work shows a reaction to the social/commercial world we live in. Bill\u2019s world has a lot of the signs of the past commercial world in which to delight, and his sculptures recombine the usage of the material-industrial world. My oil paintings sometimes show social stress from this commercial world.\u201d

The initial exhibition, Horsley notes, will continue through May 30, after which no successor has yet been formalized.

\u201cOur closing party is May 31, a Wednesday, from 5 to 8 p.m. \u2013 it\u2019s open to the public,\u201d she says, before adding, puckishly, \u201cBill hopes to sell more work so he doesn\u2019t have to take it all back to his place.\u201d

Given that her own work constitutes so integral a part of Horsley Arts\u2019 debut, the gallery\u2019s namesake addresses whether it will serve as a permanent exhibition space for her work \u2013 or whether her half of the debut simply reflects happenstance.

\u201cThe space may have only three or four shows a year, but [otherwise it] will remain an artist studio shown by appointment,\u201d Horsley says. \u201cI will continue to show in this space, and local artists will be invited to exhibit.\u201d

Otherwise, Horsley revisits her concepts \u2013 physical and aesthetic alike \u2013 for the new addition to YP\u2019s 235.

\u201cI had envisioned this smaller gallery to be something like an old-world salon with a twist of renovation,\u201d she says. \u201cIt\u2019s a comfortable space that doesn\u2019t look like a commercial storefront or even the typical whitewall gallery. It\u2019s also my studio upstairs and home above the exhibition space. The first floor has my kitchen in the back, which we used for refreshments [at the April 7 opening]. The space has modern fixtures, soft gray walls, tall ceilings and bright wood floors throughout.

\u201cIt\u2019s a comfortable gallery space, and people have enjoyed its unobtrusive environment.\u201d

To be considered for exhibition at Horsley Arts, contact Horsley at lindasue@live.com with a file of no more than five images.

Horsley Arts, 4374 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-243-3879, lindahorsley.com

"}, {"id":"2cea497e-3b25-11e7-9171-f37c2ff4b87b","type":"article","starttime":"1495041660","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-17T12:21:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495042770","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Bertha in Paradise,' 'Ensemble 2.0' Parts of Tennessee Williams Festival: Theater Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_2cea497e-3b25-11e7-9171-f37c2ff4b87b.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/bertha-in-paradise-ensemble-parts-of-tennessee-williams-festival-theater/article_2cea497e-3b25-11e7-9171-f37c2ff4b87b.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/bertha-in-paradise-ensemble-parts-of-tennessee-williams-festival-theater/article_2cea497e-3b25-11e7-9171-f37c2ff4b87b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Stories: Two presentations in the second annual Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis, Bertha in Paradise and Ensemble 2.0, offered different looks into the art and life of the renowned playwright whose formative years were spent in St. Louis. Bertha in Paradise imagines what may have happened to Bertha, a prostitute on the verge of death in the vignette Hello from Bertha in Williams\u2019 The Rooming House Plays. In Ensemble 2.0, a number of players recite letters written by members of the Williams family in a staged reading produced by Francesca Williams, the playwright\u2019s niece.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["bertha in paradise","the rooming house plays'","ensemble 2.0","curtain call lounge","fox theatre","tennessee williams festival","theater","review","zack incubator","francesca williams"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"10134382-3b25-11e7-8476-23fc790834dc","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"500","height":"375","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/01/10134382-3b25-11e7-8476-23fc790834dc/591c8642ba920.image.jpg?resize=500%2C375"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/01/10134382-3b25-11e7-8476-23fc790834dc/591c8642ba920.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/01/10134382-3b25-11e7-8476-23fc790834dc/591c8642ba920.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/01/10134382-3b25-11e7-8476-23fc790834dc/591c8642ba920.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"1b62d586-3b25-11e7-a4e8-1b2f152fafee","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"361","height":"640","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/b6/1b62d586-3b25-11e7-a4e8-1b2f152fafee/591c8655b4caf.image.jpg?resize=361%2C640"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"177","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/b6/1b62d586-3b25-11e7-a4e8-1b2f152fafee/591c8655b4caf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C177"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"532","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/b6/1b62d586-3b25-11e7-a4e8-1b2f152fafee/591c8655b4caf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C532"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1815","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/b6/1b62d586-3b25-11e7-a4e8-1b2f152fafee/591c8655b4caf.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"2cea497e-3b25-11e7-9171-f37c2ff4b87b","body":"

Stories: Two presentations in the second annual Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis, Bertha in Paradise and Ensemble 2.0, offered different looks into the art and life of the renowned playwright whose formative years were spent in St. Louis.

Bertha in Paradise imagines what may have happened to Bertha, a prostitute on the verge of death in the vignette Hello from Bertha in Williams\u2019 The Rooming House Plays. In Ensemble 2.0, a number of players recite letters written by members of the Williams family in a staged reading produced by Francesca Williams, the playwright\u2019s niece.

Other Info: Building on momentum created with the inaugural Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis in 2016, the second annual event featured 19 distinct elements and 54 performances, including plays, live music, movies, visual arts exhibits, readings, panel discussions, contests, tours and parties.

Bertha in Paradise kicked off festivities on Wednesday, May 4 at the Curtain Call Lounge which adjoins The Fox Theatre with Anita Jackson reprising her role from last year\u2019s performance of Hello from Bertha. This version of Bertha was decidedly more upbeat and robust, as Bertha in Paradise conjectures what became of the character of Bertha from The Rooming House Plays\u2019 vignette.

Jackson was accompanied by the honky-tonk stylings of pianist Charles Creath, with Donna Weinsting repeating her role as the madam Goldie, Joel King as an agreeable stage hand and Maggie Winninger on opening night only as a young associate of Bertha\u2019s. Each of them took turns performing, although Jackson did the lion\u2019s share of the cabaret-style warbling.

The show focused on deliveries of blue and bawdy classics such as I Need a Little Sugar in My Bowl, My Daddy Rocks Me and My Handy Man, each of which Jackson shaped with her signature crooning style, larger than life, eager to please and happy to be pleased as well. While too often repetitive in its execution, the show was managed capably by director David Kaplan, who adhered to the \u201cearthly pleasures\u201d preferred by Bertha in songstress mode.

Weinsting had a grand time asking the ribald question, Anybody Here Want to Try My Cabbage?, and the troupe occasionally joined Jackson for a grinning melody or two. Performed in the intimate Curtain Call Lounge, Bertha in Paradise set the stage for the four primary days of the festival, May 4-7.

On Monday, May 8, several performers gathered on the stage at the .ZACK Incubator for a staged reading of Ensemble 2.0. Produced by writer/editor/artist Francesca Williams, daughter of Williams\u2019 younger brother Dakin, Ensemble 2.0 traces the lives of matriarch Edwina Williams and her three children Rose, Thomas and Walter Dakin from childhood to their deaths.

It offered a sometimes interesting glimpse into the personal lives of the Williams family, although never once mentioning Tom\u2019s homosexuality or his \u201ccolorful\u201d life far from his genteel Southern background or Midwestern heartland childhood. The specter of the roustabout Williams\u2019 patriarch, a traveling salesman who abandoned his family but whose influence still remained, loomed over the piece.

Directed by Richard Chapman, the reading seemed to exhibit some friction between players from time to time, or maybe that was just my imagination. Often, too, some performers stumbled over their lines, indicating that perhaps more rehearsal time would have been advantageous both for them and for the final product.

Still, there were memorable performances. Broadway actress Angelica Page, daughter of actor Rip Torn and the late actress Geraldine Page, shaped her presentation of Edwina\u2019s correspondence with the acerbic, starched and eccentric style that recalls Amanda Wingfield from The Glass Menagerie. Her words were clipped, lips pursed and rarely did a smile etch her face.

Bridgette Bassa conveyed the pampered and later delusional life of Rose, who suffered an egregious lobotomy in a disastrous effort to address her increasing psychological instability, while Ben Watkins portrayed the stiff Dakin, who brought his own sometimes bizarre behavior to the family but also kept it afloat with his legal background and mind for business.

Paul Cereghino\u2019s depiction of Thomas Lanier \u201cTennessee\u201d Williams was all over the board, ranging from the attentive missives sent by the successful yet dutiful son and brother to his exasperation with his brother\u2019s folly-filled forays into politics and his honest, loving concern for his troubled sister. Kari Ely portrayed Williams\u2019 long-time agent Audrey Wood, the lone non-relative at the podium.

While interesting in revealing aspects of the Williams\u2019 family\u2019s personal background, Ensemble 2.0 was by its very nature too often static and uninvolving. Still, it served as an informative addition to the festival, and references to sites and buildings known to St. Louisans reaffirmed what a local treasure Williams\u2019 legacy remains to this day.

Plays: Bertha in Paradise, Ensemble 2.0

Company: Second Annual Tennessee Williams Festival

Venue: Curtain Call Lounge, .ZACK Incubator

Dates: Runs concluded

Photos courtesy of Ride Hamilton and ProPhotoSTL

"}, {"id":"2dfd2b54-3b18-11e7-9978-ef3fefb60f19","type":"article","starttime":"1495036020","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-17T10:47:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495036523","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis?' Is Poetic and Eccentric Williams: Theater Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_2dfd2b54-3b18-11e7-9978-ef3fefb60f19.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/will-mr-merriwether-return-from-memphis-is-poetic-and-eccentric/article_2dfd2b54-3b18-11e7-9978-ef3fefb60f19.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/will-mr-merriwether-return-from-memphis-is-poetic-and-eccentric/article_2dfd2b54-3b18-11e7-9978-ef3fefb60f19.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: Louise lives with her daughter Gloria, a headstrong teenager who is on the verge of womanhood. While Gloria attracts the attention of many of the boys at school, Louise inhabits a fantasy existence, awaiting the return of a handsome traveling salesman named Merriwether who left her once for the road. Despite that, Louise holds the hope that he\u2019ll return and that their romance will resume.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["tennessee williams","tennessee williams festival","stockton house","will mr. merriwether return from memphis?","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"1a204576-3b18-11e7-ab97-53cfcb15dc89","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"640","height":"427","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a204576-3b18-11e7-ab97-53cfcb15dc89/591c7084297fa.image.jpg?resize=640%2C427"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a204576-3b18-11e7-ab97-53cfcb15dc89/591c7084297fa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a204576-3b18-11e7-ab97-53cfcb15dc89/591c7084297fa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/a2/1a204576-3b18-11e7-ab97-53cfcb15dc89/591c7084297fa.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"2dfd2b54-3b18-11e7-9978-ef3fefb60f19","body":"

Story: Louise lives with her daughter Gloria, a headstrong teenager who is on the verge of womanhood. While Gloria attracts the attention of many of the boys at school, Louise inhabits a fantasy existence, awaiting the return of a handsome traveling salesman named Merriwether who left her once for the road. Despite that, Louise holds the hope that he\u2019ll return and that their romance will resume.

Neighbor Nora dabbles in the spirit world, believing that she conjures up the specters of famous sorts such as artist Vincent van Gogh as well as unnamed apparitions who seem to speak to her beyond the grave, and maybe even the ghost of late husband Cornelius, who was most unfaithful to her in marriage.

Somewhere between reality and imagination all three reside, whether living in the moment as does Gloria or the older ladies keeping the home fires burning for men who aren\u2019t likely to return to their sides.

Highlights: Part of the second annual Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis, this production of Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis? offers an opportunity to participate in one of the playwright\u2019s later and more experimental works. That\u2019s because it\u2019s done in the style of \u2018immersive theater\u2019 in which an audience is swept into the drama as it moves throughout the Stockton House venue.

Other Info: Director Jef Awada pulls out plenty of stops to challenge viewers with his presentation of this eccentric Williams work. There\u2019s plenty of cross-casting, e.g., with Bob Harvey, Terry Meddows and Sophia Brown playing roles opposite their sex in mostly arched style. An unnamed banjo player provides musical accompaniment and occasional dialogue as well.

As with The Rooming House Plays performed last year, Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis?, a one-act work written in 1969 but not performed until 1980, takes its audiences into various rooms in the Stockton House, although more out of whimsy than necessity. Perhaps that\u2019s because Mr. Merriwether is more a slight theatrical appetizer rather than a hearty, fully prepared entr\u00e9e, and tricking it up enhances the experience.

Regardless, seasoned professionals such as Julie Layton and Kelley Weber shape their characters with pathos and vulnerability which bring much-needed heft to their roles. Layton\u2019s Louise can fluctuate between harsh assessments of Nora\u2019s forays into the supernatural and Louise\u2019s own ethereal escape from humdrum existence into the arms of her mostly mythical lover. Layton spends a good deal of her time gazing into the ethos, which works well enough in this case.

Weber fills Nora with hope, optimism and congeniality, a woman who even forgives her late husband for his flagrant indiscretions while alive. She eats a bit too much out of nervousness or frustration, but she has a good heart and appears to be always interested in the welfare of Louise and anyone else.

Molly McCaskill plays Gloria with the carefree abandon of youth, mindful of how her budding beauty captivates her fellow students. She joins Jacob Flekier as the Romantically Handsome Youth, a stuttering but sincere young man who pairs with Gloria in a passionate pas de deux that resonates in isolation or in tandem with an unsuspecting Louise. James Robey\u2019s choreography complements Williams\u2019 often poetic dialogue with the natural beauty of two bodies in slow but magnetic motion.

Harvey, Meddows and Brown appear in union as The Eumenides, a trio of crones who cackle about the goings-on among the odd residents of this mysterious place while swigging a gulp or two from a shared flask.

Harvey also is amusing as a prim and proper librarian, while Meddows chews up the scenery as a debauched old lady who, legend has it, has gone beyond the maximum number of face lifts and now ventures out only under the guise of heavy makeup.

Brown is just fine as a gay French instructor who is forced to leave town, as well as the disembodied van Gogh, benefiting from Robin McGee\u2019s sharp costume design that hides her female form in baggy clothes, as opposed to the absurd garb which adorns Harvey and Meddows for comic effect. Wig designer Abby Schmidt adds to the absurdity with amusing hairpieces.

Michael Perkins\u2019 sound design brings an additional layer of eeriness and enchantment to the proceedings, all of which are hauntingly accentuated by Michael Sullivan\u2019s precise lighting.

Filled with poetic language, exaggerated situations and eccentric embellishments, Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis? is a good example of the more experimental works written by Williams later in his life. Under Awada\u2019s clever and creative direction, it\u2019s given a handsome performance fitting for presentation in a festival highlighting the long and varied career of St. Louis\u2019 great playwright.

Play: Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis?

Company: Tennessee Williams Festival

Venue: Stockton House, 3508 Samuel Shepard Drive

Dates: May 20, 21

Tickets: $35; contact twstl.org, metrotix.com or 534-1111

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Ride Hamilton and ProPhotoSTL

"}, {"id":"b85a2d84-39a5-11e7-9a7f-e7d7a4bd9995","type":"article","starttime":"1494876900","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-15T14:35:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1495122837","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: 4000 Miles","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_b85a2d84-39a5-11e7-9a7f-e7d7a4bd9995.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-miles/article_b85a2d84-39a5-11e7-9a7f-e7d7a4bd9995.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-miles/article_b85a2d84-39a5-11e7-9a7f-e7d7a4bd9995.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":8,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"New Jewish Theatre brings down the curtain on its 20th season with a tenderly crafted interpretation of Amy Herzog\u2019s Pulitzer Prize-finalist drama under Edward Coffield\u2019s softly focused direction.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["new jewish theatre","communists","politics","lettists","greenwich village","amy herzog","4000 miles","theater","review","play","drama"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2f/72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995/591a02a9e2e2e.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2f/72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995/591a02a9e1de8.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2f/72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995/591a02a9e1de8.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2f/72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995/591a02a9e1de8.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/2f/72f62b3a-39a5-11e7-91af-5f689ba84995/591a02a9e1de8.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/c8/7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48/591a02b9ef00a.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/c8/7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48/591a02b9ed985.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/c8/7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48/591a02b9ed985.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/c8/7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48/591a02b9ed985.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/c8/7c86b750-39a5-11e7-93a8-23b396d70a48/591a02b9ed985.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/ab/8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29/591a02d1b9f7f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/ab/8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29/591a02d1b8706.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/ab/8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29/591a02d1b8706.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/ab/8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29/591a02d1b8706.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/ab/8ab38da8-39a5-11e7-b979-6f68d4f25d29/591a02d1b8706.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3b/93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735/591a02e0d7a3b.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3b/93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735/591a02e0d6a20.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3b/93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735/591a02e0d6a20.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3b/93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735/591a02e0d6a20.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3b/93b77c02-39a5-11e7-a11b-d3c323bb9735/591a02e0d6a20.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407/591a02f17d4f7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407/591a02f17bf3d.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407/591a02f17bf3d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407/591a02f17bf3d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/da/9da0a8d8-39a5-11e7-a002-93738fc22407/591a02f17bf3d.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/6b/56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210/591a027a819e6.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/6b/56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210/591a027a80281.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/6b/56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210/591a027a80281.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/6b/56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210/591a027a80281.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/6b/56b55324-39a5-11e7-b254-c7b82005c210/591a027a80281.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1600,"hiresheight":1066,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/26/62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a/591a028e27609.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/26/62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a/591a028e25e2a.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/26/62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a/591a028e25e2a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/26/62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a/591a028e25e2a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/26/62689b68-39a5-11e7-8968-3317a3b83c6a/591a028e25e2a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Eric Woolsey","hireswidth":1066,"hiresheight":1600,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8/591a029be2554.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"506","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8/591a029be0f52.image.jpg?resize=506%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8/591a029be0f52.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8/591a029be0f52.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1537","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/a9/6a9d30dc-39a5-11e7-bac9-1b83890d06d8/591a029be0f52.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1537"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"b85a2d84-39a5-11e7-9a7f-e7d7a4bd9995","body":"

Story: Vera is awakened late one night by a knock at her Greenwich Village apartment door. It\u2019s her 21-year-old grandson Leo, anything but fresh after a cross-country bicycling adventure from Seattle.

While she scurries to find him some food and bedding, they catch up haphazardly on the lives of their mutual relatives. Communication isn\u2019t easy, both because 91-year-old Vera is prone not to wearing her hearing aid and also because Leo is abrupt and rather impulsive in his thoughts and behavior.

Over the next few weeks, though, the two left-leaning political activists learn to enjoy their badinage as well as revealing their own shortcomings. Leo is grieving over the accidental death of his cycling pal Micah as well as reacting against the frequent need for reassurance about his safety by his more conservative mother Jane back home in St. Paul. There\u2019s also the matter of his relationship with his adopted sister Lily, a little too close for the comfort of either Jane or Vera.

Leo hopes to reconnect with his former girlfriend Becca while in New York, but Becca has ambitious plans that don\u2019t include Leo. Still, she has feelings for him that rise to the surface in a contentious meeting at Vera\u2019s apartment.

Vera is an unrepentant communist knocked down by the deaths of too many friends, while Leo is a strong-willed, free spirit raging against the injustices of life. In their time together they learn more about each other and what bonds them.

Highlights: New Jewish Theatre brings down the curtain on its 20th season with a tenderly crafted interpretation of Amy Herzog\u2019s Pulitzer Prize-finalist drama under Edward Coffield\u2019s softly focused direction.

Other Info: Herzog\u2019s one-act, 90-minute work debuted off-Broadway in 2011 and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. Like another of her efforts, After the Revolution, it features a character based on her real-life grandmother, Leepee Joseph, an ardent leftist of causes in the 20th and even the 21st centuries.

A production of 4000 Miles at The Rep in 2013 was marred by a portrayal of Leo as boorish and obnoxious, either because of the presentation\u2019s director or the actor in the role. Whatever the reason, New Jewish Theatre\u2019s version seems much closer to realizing the tenderness of the relationships between characters referenced in reviews of the play\u2019s off-Broadway productions.

Director Coffield paints gentler portraits of the primary characters here which are realized in satisfying fashion by Amy Loui as the inquisitive Vera and Chris Tipp as her rudderless grandson. The two connect grandly as they enact conversations between grandmother and grandson that also show them to be friends and allies, though not without conflict. Coffield\u2019s pacing is steady and low-key throughout.

Loui is far too vital and energized to be convincing as a nonagenarian at first glance. She quickly proves her mettle, however, by convincing an audience with her halting gait and shaking hand that she can assume the role of the feisty Vera and claim it as her own, aided by movement coach Jaimie McKittrick. She\u2019s also engagingly amusing in a scene where she shares some thoughts and weed with the laid-back Leo as they ponder life and their own experiences with it.

Tipp portrays Leo as a bit flighty and aimless, but he shapes the character\u2019s crude language with a soft edge that is essential to make Leo a likable figure. He\u2019s adept at showing the young man\u2019s aching vulnerability in his awkward reunion with Becca, a woman he loves but doesn\u2019t really understand.

Rachel Fenton fits the role of Becca like a well-worn glove, slipping into the character\u2019s good manners upon meeting Vera while additionally depicting the ambitious student\u2019s frustrations with her comparatively immature lover, power chewing her gum all the while. It\u2019s difficult to watch the growing chasm between the two that appears inevitable albeit painful.

Grace Langford does well in a small role as a young Chinese-American girl whose promiscuity veers away sharply when she learns about the communist leanings of Leo\u2019s family, as she pointedly explains. Annie Barbour provides the disembodied voice of Lily in a scene where Leo \u2018skypes\u2019 with Lily on Vera\u2019s unused computer.

Scenic designer Marissa Todd fashions a tidy representation of Vera\u2019s faded apartment, which hasn\u2019t been remodeled in nearly 40 years and features furniture prevalent in the Mad Men era of the late \u201850s and \u201860s, complemented by Laura Srkoska\u2019s props, such as several old photographs on the back wall.

Interestingly, Zoe Sullivan\u2019s sound design is dominated by tunes from the \u201860s and \u201870s, a little beyond Vera\u2019s youthful era and certainly before Leo even existed. Perhaps the music of the middle generation represented by the unseen Jane serves as a bridge between the older and younger leftists.

Costuming by Michele Friedman Siler fits each of the four characters, while Michael Sullivan\u2019s lighting captures the times of the day as well as the tenor of the conversations.

As NJT artistic director Kathleen Sitzer and director Coffield each favorably note in the show\u2019s program, 4000 Miles is \u201ca small play with a big heart.\u201d

Play: 4000 Miles

Company: New Jewish Theatre

Venue: Wool Theatre, Jewish Community Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive

Dates: May 17, 18, 20, 21, 24, 25, 27, 28

Tickets: $39.50-$43.50; contact 442-3283 or newjewishtheatre.org

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

"}, {"id":"0a9d3e13-325c-5621-a876-6768034bc190","type":"article","starttime":"1494522000","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-11T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1494522482","priority":45,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Houses Rise and Fall","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_0a9d3e13-325c-5621-a876-6768034bc190.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/houses-rise-and-fall/article_0a9d3e13-325c-5621-a876-6768034bc190.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/houses-rise-and-fall/article_0a9d3e13-325c-5621-a876-6768034bc190.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"A project sponsored by two heavy hitters in the arts and architecture spheres urges viewers to contemplate the beautiful mutability of urban streetscapes.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["a way","away (listen while i say)","andres l. hernandez","amanda williams","grand center","washington avenue","pulitzer arts foundation","sam fox school of design & visual arts"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1765,"hiresheight":1174,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/df/bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c/5914831d5e3db.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/df/bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c/5914831d5d3c0.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/df/bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c/5914831d5d3c0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/df/bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c/5914831d5d3c0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"681","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/df/bdfff3e7-6be1-506e-9806-8db814405a8c/5914831d5d3c0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C681"}}},{"id":"c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0","description":"Amanda Williams","byline":"Photo by Anne Ryan","hireswidth":1175,"hiresheight":1762,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/61/c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0/5914831c9d538.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/61/c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0/5914831c9bac9.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/61/c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0/5914831c9bac9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/61/c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0/5914831c9bac9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/61/c6147d55-2fea-531e-bc34-4f60952d52f0/5914831c9bac9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"7f7dc094-ff00-5d41-8bf5-94d7fcf30289","description":"Andres L. Hernandez","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"595","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f7/7f7dc094-ff00-5d41-8bf5-94d7fcf30289/5914831d03fef.image.jpg?crop=679%2C867%2C97%2C9&resize=595%2C760&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"128","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f7/7f7dc094-ff00-5d41-8bf5-94d7fcf30289/5914831d03fef.image.jpg?crop=679%2C867%2C97%2C9&resize=100%2C128&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"383","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f7/7f7dc094-ff00-5d41-8bf5-94d7fcf30289/5914831d03fef.image.jpg?crop=679%2C867%2C97%2C9&resize=300%2C383&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1308","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f7/7f7dc094-ff00-5d41-8bf5-94d7fcf30289/5914831d03fef.image.jpg?crop=679%2C867%2C97%2C9"}}},{"id":"3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1765,"hiresheight":1174,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fe/3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb/5914831dc8316.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fe/3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb/5914831dc73c9.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fe/3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb/5914831dc73c9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fe/3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb/5914831dc73c9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"681","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/fe/3feea31d-eab5-5edc-a733-f7d2d7e3befb/5914831dc73c9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C681"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"0a9d3e13-325c-5621-a876-6768034bc190","body":"
\"PXSTL2017
PXSTL2017 _Marking_131.jpg

In a central St. Louis neighborhood at the moment, a duo of distinguished Chicagoans are exploring the transformative and revitalizing power of art, in both space and time, in an intriguing and perhaps even sui generis fashion.

\"Amanda

Amanda Williams

\"AndresLHernandez_Headshot_by

Andres L. Hernandez

As the focus of a joint commission collaboratively organized by the Pulitzer Arts Foundation and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, artists Andres L. Hernandez and Amanda Williams have launched a seasons-spanning design-build project titled \u201cA Way, Away (Listen While I Say).\u201d

The project, which started in midspring and runs through autumn, is unfolding at 3721 Washington Ave., due north of the Pulitzer, in Grand Center.

\u201cWe received the commission to explore the ways in which small-scale creative interventions might serve as meaningful catalysts for urban transformation,\u201d state Hernandez and Williams, in tandem, by email.

At a time when St. Louis, from day to day, teeters on the brink of becoming \u201cthe new Detroit\u201d \u2013 that is, a municipality mired in long-term urban decay and other societal woes \u2013 Hernandez and Williams continue by confessing to being \u201cinterested in the restorative and redemptive potential of vacant urban sites.\u201d

In that regard, the two cite prior individual works of theirs that might rank as aesthetic precursors of \u201cA Way, Away.\u201d

More specifically, Hernandez mentions a 2014 project titled \u201cBenign Neglect (let rocks their silence break)\u201d that used aerial images of Chicago\u2019s Washington Park as \u201cplans\u201d for a Zen garden \u2013 establishing \u201ca rite, a rhythm and a prompt for dialogue about a wealth of social and spatial possibilities\u201d \u2013 subsequently constructed in the courtyard of the University of Chicago\u2019s Logan Center.

Williams, for her part, references an exuberant series, also from 2014, titled \u201cColor(ed)Theory\u201d designed to interpret potential sociopolitical underpinnings of this nation\u2019s quotidian collective palette by asking questions like these: \u201cWhat color is urban? What color is gentrification? What color is privilege? What color is poverty?\u201d

Given the scope of Hernandez and Williams\u2019 present project, both physically and temporally, they also dwell, briefly, on the categorical pedigree of \u201cA Way, Away.\u201d

\u201cIn general, the project falls into several contemporary threads in architectural discourse as the industry grapples with questions of vacancy, demolition, reuse, preservation [and] sustainability, also the overlap of art and architecture,\u201d they state. \u201cWe\u2019ve looked at a broad spectrum of projects as references for different segments.\u201d

In that regard, oddly enough, \u201cA Way, Away\u201d approximates a 3-D realization of a 1993 serigraph by \u00fcber-underground cartoonist R. Crumb. In Crumb\u2019s customarily exquisite stipple, the 15 panels of that serigraph, titled A Short History of America, track a single domestic parcel, decade after decade, from pastoral serenity through urban insanity, culminating in three prospective views.

In addition to Pulitzer staff and Sam Fox School faculty, staff and students, Hernandez and Williams mention assistance in realizing \u201cA Way, Away\u201d from \u201cseveral outside contractors to shape and deliver our proposed project phases, as well as document the project in full.\u201d Such contractors include professionals in painting, demolition, the neophyte mini-industry of brick \u201charvesting\u201d and landscaping.

The physical and temporal scope of the project \u2013 whose open nature visitors can view both at their leisure and for free \u2013 explains the necessity for such assistance. \u201c\u2018A Way, Away\u2019 began in February by painting the condemned building at 3721 Washington Blvd. gold prior to demolition,\u201d state Hernandez and Williams. \u201cThe project will continue to unfold in phases over the next several months through fall 2017.\u201d

The Chicagoans \u201chave developed five major site interventions that parallel the cyclical phases of demolition and construction within the built environment and within the immediate Washington Boulevard corridor. Each intervention is guided by a related contemporary issue in urban planning and policy, architecture, art, the construction industry and related fields of practice and inquiry.\u201d

The first \u201cintervention,\u201d Marking, involved painting the 3721 Washington Blvd. building gold, as noted. In so doing, Hernandez and Williams sought to \u201critualize the act of un/building\u201d by preparing the structure for transition. For this intervention, they sought community participation by inviting neighbors of the building, students and others \u2013 including, puckishly, passersby \u2013 to take part in the painting.

Subtracting, the second intervention, will comprise what Hernandez and Williams call \u201cchoreographed demolition\u201d: deconstructing walls (in a physical sense, not in a philosophical or literary sense) and razing the remaining structure and foundation by using \u201cconstruction equipment as tools for un-drawing the site.\u201d

The third intervention, Translating, will transform the architectural remains of the former building into a smaller sculptural object in what the pair call an \u201citerative and choreographed process in collaboration with contractors.\u201d This intervention also will involve harvesting the former building\u2019s precious bricks for subsequent use and developing a temporary workspace to clean, sort, stack and deliver them.

Shaping, the fourth intervention, will focus on redefining the site\u2019s greensward through designed sod planting. The bricks harvested in the third intervention will be used in community design projects.

Finally, in the fifth intervention, which Hernandez and Williams call Healing, they\u2019ll \u201cdeinstall\u201d the project and return the site to its preproject state. At this point, they\u2019ll also gift the harvested bricks to preselected local partners and \u201critualize\u201d the closure of \u201cA Way, Away.\u201d

Both for the nonce and for the future, as well as in pixel and in print, Hernandez and Williams note, \u201cAll five phases of the project are being documented\u00a0\u2026\u00a0\u201d

In pixel, documentation involves a stand-alone project website and other sites, including Instagram (@awayawaystl). In print, each intervention will be \u201cposterized\u201d in broadsides including new and reprinted essays available in the Pulitzer and free to visitors as they view \u201cA Way, Away\u201d or attend related programs. \u201cLastly, the two of us are working to capture the project in full through a book project in the near future,\u201d Hernandez and Williams state.

In addition to presenting \u201cA Way, Away,\u201d the two together served as visiting assistant professors at the Sam Fox School last fall; both also will serve on the exhibition design team for the museum at the future Barack Obama Presidential Center, tentatively scheduled for completion on Chicago\u2019s South Side in 2020 or 2021.

Those two bona fides, by the way, merely number among a plethora of credentials for the distinguished duo. Academically, Hernandez earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Ithaca, New York\u2019s Cornell University and a Master of Arts degree in art education from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Similarly, Williams earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree with an emphasis in fine art from Cornell.

Hernandez and Williams\u2019 \u201cA Way, Away,\u201d it bears noting, already has earned praise from the highest levels of both entities backing their commission.

\u201cWe are thrilled that they will bring their experience working in cities marked by vacancy \u2013 along with an approach that is at once deeply thoughtful, bold and practical \u2013 to the St. Louis community,\u201d Pulitzer director Cara Starke remarked in an early-March press release.

In the same release, Carmon Colangelo, dean of the Sam Fox School, noted that Hernandez and Williams \u201ccombine the roles of artist, architect, art educator and social activist,\u201d before continuing, \u201cI am confident that they will bring the same dynamic dialogue to this project, activating the space and spurring inclusive conversation about art and design in the public realm.\u201d

In the final analysis, \u201cA Way, Away\u201d recalls a haunting passage from \u201cEast Coker,\u201d the second magisterial movement of St. Louis native T.S. Eliot\u2019s Four Quartets: \u201cIn succession / Houses rise and fall, crumble, are extended, / Are removed, destroyed, restored, or in their place / Is an open field, or a factory, or a by-pass.\u201d

\u201cA Way, Away (Listen While I Say),\u201d awayaway.site

\"aWayAway_Translating_029.jpg\"
aWayAway_Translating_029.jpg
"}, {"id":"e3fcacde-3665-11e7-a5db-affbaf7f4803","type":"article","starttime":"1494519660","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-11T11:21:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1494599071","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Small Craft Warnings","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_e3fcacde-3665-11e7-a5db-affbaf7f4803.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-small-craft-warnings/article_e3fcacde-3665-11e7-a5db-affbaf7f4803.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-small-craft-warnings/article_e3fcacde-3665-11e7-a5db-affbaf7f4803.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":10,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"Small Craft Warnings\u00a0is a handsomely staged presentation directed by Richard Corley, featuring a cast of capable players interpreting the St. Louis playwright\u2019s dialogue in one of his later works.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["small craft warnings","tennessee williams festival","carrie houk","grand center","tennessee williams","theater","play","review","zack incubator"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d","description":"","byline":"Photos by Ride Hamilton","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1487,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d/59148eb1844c7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"516","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d/59148eb1829c2.image.jpg?crop=1648%2C1119%2C20%2C11&resize=760%2C516&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d/59148eb1829c2.image.jpg?crop=1648%2C1119%2C20%2C11&resize=100%2C68&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d/59148eb1829c2.image.jpg?crop=1648%2C1119%2C20%2C11&resize=300%2C204&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"695","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62cd1978-3665-11e7-8372-7356609a896d/59148eb1829c2.image.jpg?crop=1648%2C1119%2C20%2C11&resize=1024%2C695&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1396,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f7/bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184/59148f4d0baa5.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"518","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f7/bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184/59148f4d0a81a.image.jpg?resize=760%2C518"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f7/bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184/59148f4d0a81a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f7/bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184/59148f4d0a81a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f7/bf7debd4-3665-11e7-80b7-77d57667a184/59148f4d0a81a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C698"}}},{"id":"cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1365,"hiresheight":2048,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8/59148f6505ec7.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8/59148f6504970.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8/59148f6504970.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8/59148f6504970.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/dc/cdc83136-3665-11e7-a7e6-3f43cfbfe8d8/59148f6504970.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1496,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ea/6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64/59148ec5723f7.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"555","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ea/6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64/59148ec5711ed.image.jpg?resize=760%2C555"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"73","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ea/6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64/59148ec5711ed.image.jpg?resize=100%2C73"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"219","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ea/6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64/59148ec5711ed.image.jpg?resize=300%2C219"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"748","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/ea/6eae1544-3665-11e7-a7b9-37bfc62c8c64/59148ec5711ed.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C748"}}},{"id":"7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1813,"hiresheight":2048,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/cc/7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c/59148edd13dbe.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"673","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/cc/7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c/59148edd12648.image.jpg?resize=673%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"113","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/cc/7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c/59148edd12648.image.jpg?resize=100%2C113"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"339","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/cc/7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c/59148edd12648.image.jpg?resize=300%2C339"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1156","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/cc/7cc0e62a-3665-11e7-86ed-f312a0cf726c/59148edd12648.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1156"}}},{"id":"865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1396,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/65/865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d/59148eed34bb0.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"518","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/65/865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d/59148eed336cd.image.jpg?resize=760%2C518"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/65/865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d/59148eed336cd.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/65/865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d/59148eed336cd.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/65/865f0dc4-3665-11e7-b5e1-538d0038135d/59148eed336cd.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C698"}}},{"id":"93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1365,"hiresheight":2048,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3a/93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d/59148f0374570.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3a/93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d/59148f03735ef.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3a/93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d/59148f03735ef.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3a/93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d/59148f03735ef.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/3a/93a40de0-3665-11e7-8f1b-dfe1a487265d/59148f03735ef.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1396,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ef/9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0/59148f1673e3f.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"518","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ef/9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0/59148f1672927.image.jpg?resize=760%2C518"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ef/9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0/59148f1672927.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ef/9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0/59148f1672927.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/ef/9ef68402-3665-11e7-9982-0b22ce5e64e0/59148f1672927.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C698"}}},{"id":"ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1396,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e1/ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe/59148f2fc6014.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"518","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e1/ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe/59148f2fc4ef1.image.jpg?resize=760%2C518"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e1/ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe/59148f2fc4ef1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"204","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e1/ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe/59148f2fc4ef1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C204"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"698","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/e1/ae10d15e-3665-11e7-b143-4b3424ddccfe/59148f2fc4ef1.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C698"}}},{"id":"55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1528,"hiresheight":2048,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/5b/55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30/59148e9b8a9e7.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"567","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/5b/55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30/59148e9b893cf.image.jpg?resize=567%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"134","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/5b/55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30/59148e9b893cf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C134"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"402","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/5b/55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30/59148e9b893cf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C402"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1372","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/5b/55b44f5e-3665-11e7-9345-d7520ac0fd30/59148e9b893cf.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1372"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"e3fcacde-3665-11e7-a5db-affbaf7f4803","body":"

Story: Monk opens his southern California seaside bar to another evening of revelry and reminiscences. He enjoys talking with the patrons of his modest but welcoming establishment, where regulars can feel at home and visitors can escape the outside world with their beverage of choice.

Occasionally, someone might want to stay after closing, and if Monk is sympathetic enough he may comply. Generally, though, he informs his clientele that there are \u201ctaverns that serve drinks and food and have lodgings, there are taverns that serve drinks and food, and there are taverns that serve drinks only.\u201d His bar, he says, fits into the latter category.

Regulars include Leona, an exuberant beautician who\u2019s been sharing her trailer for the last six months with a handsome, bigoted ne\u2019er-do-well named Bill, a man who has worn out his welcome. Doc has been stripped of his medical license but continues to practice on the sly. Violet is a down-on-her-luck floozy who enjoys catering to young sailors who arrive in port but also benefits from the generosity of Steve, a short-order cook who keeps her fed with hot dogs and burgers.

On this particular night -- the anniversary of the death of Leona\u2019s artistically talented and \u2018different\u2019 younger brother -- Monk\u2019s is patronized as well by a pair of gay men, an older scriptwriter named Quentin and Bobby, a young man who has bicycled from Iowa across the country to see the Pacific Ocean.

This collection of lost souls contemplates life over a drink or three, some songs from the jukebox and the conversations of their fellow travelers to Monk\u2019s sanctuary from the indifference of the world. They get by as best they can.

Highlights: First produced in 1972, Small Craft Warnings serves as the \u2018marquee\u2019 production in the second annual Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis in a handsomely staged presentation directed by Richard Corley. It features a cast of capable players interpreting the St. Louis playwright\u2019s dialogue in one of his later works.

Other Info: The Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis this year, guided by executive artistic director Carrie Houk, has expanded beyond the one weekend of performances in its inaugural season with a pair of plays, Small Craft Warnings and Will Mr. Merriwether Return from Memphis?, which continue into subsequent weekends in May.

Scenic designer Dunsi Dai makes shrewd use of the stage at the .ZACK Incubator venue in Grand Center to depict the innards of Monk\u2019s tavern, which features a mounted sailfish courtesy of props provider Annina Christensen above the well-stocked bar to accentuate the coastal environs. A jukebox in the back, a door to the restroom at stage right and an opening at stage left leading to Monk\u2019s living quarters above the tavern, along with a couple of tables and a smattering of chairs, provide the ambiance.

Robin McGee dresses the players in costumes that match their characters, from the tacky polyester slacks favored by Bill to Steve\u2019s grimy T-shirt to the sailor cap that epitomizes Leona\u2019s lusty and adventurous spirit and the blazer and open shirt fancied by Quentin. Sound designer Michael Perkins adds some classical tunes preferred by Leona on the jukebox, while Michael Sullivan\u2019s lighting showcases each of the players in their monologues of varying lengths.

On opening night, Corley\u2019s pacing seemed initially off-kilter, stutter-starting sporadically until it caught its rhythm. With the exception of Peter Mayer\u2019s Monk, the players each made their entrance through the bar\u2019s \u2018front door\u2019 at the back of the set, which filled with fog later on to emphasize the nautical surroundings late at night.

Williams\u2019 poetic language serves the soliloquies well, especially the haunting words of Leona and Quentin. Elizabeth Townsend brings out the humanity and collegial spirit of the former, impassioned in her pleading for others to recognize the achievements of her dearly beloved late brother while also urging Bobby, Violet et al to grab for the brass ring while they can.

As Quentin, John Bratkowski savors the words of the gay screenwriter like his favorite drink, eloquently explaining how his once passionate zeal for life gave way along the way to quiet resignation and reflection. It\u2019s a haunting and melancholy image etched precisely by Bratkowski for effect.

Eric Dean White and Jared Sanz-Agero show the small worlds of the loutish, self-centered Bill and the sympathetic, lackluster Steve, respectively. White conveys the emptiness of the opportunistic, venal huckster while Sanz-Agero brings across Steve\u2019s humble, halting efforts to help Violet survive another day.

Magan Wiles skillfully depicts Violet\u2019s desperate pleas, with sunken cheeks and haunted eyes as well as the looks of desperation and absent-minded physical pleasure which she assumes is her only asset, gravitating from man to man as the whim drives her. Spencer Milford\u2019s open face and friendly expression serve well to shape the Midwestern geniality of Bobby, and Richard Schicker has a brief role as the cop who patrols the pier district.

In the world-weary department, Peter Mayer brings out the sensibilities of the proprietor Monk, who\u2019s survived a couple of heart attacks and is content to take life one day at a time. Jeremy Lawrence relishes the bon mots and pithy asides offered by the broken-down Doc, a role played by Williams himself in the original off-Broadway production.

Small Craft Warnings is more of a moment in time and a series of monologues rather than a conventional play with a plot woven throughout its one act and 90 minutes. Its strength lies in Williams\u2019 elegantly shaped language and his reflections on the human condition.

Play: Small Craft Warnings

Company: Tennessee Williams Festival

Venue: .ZACK Incubator, 3224 Locust Street

Dates: May 11, 12, 13, 14

Tickets: $35; contact twstl.org, metrotix.com or 534-1111

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Ride Hamilton and ProPhotoSTL.com

"}, {"id":"5b067b50-6524-58f4-9bae-093f0f0d5685","type":"article","starttime":"1493917200","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-04T12:00:00-05:00","priority":45,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"The Fairest of Them All","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_5b067b50-6524-58f4-9bae-093f0f0d5685.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/the-fairest-of-them-all/article_5b067b50-6524-58f4-9bae-093f0f0d5685.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/the-fairest-of-them-all/article_5b067b50-6524-58f4-9bae-093f0f0d5685.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"An event this weekend at the St. Louis Mercantile Library celebrates the continuing art \u2013 and allure \u2013 of ink on paper.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["st. louis fine print","rare book and paper arts fair","st. louis mercantile library","umsl"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"6b600127-c23e-5ab9-9e14-56d8abe68c83","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"522","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/b6/6b600127-c23e-5ab9-9e14-56d8abe68c83/590b51ac3a894.image.jpg?resize=760%2C522"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"69","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/b6/6b600127-c23e-5ab9-9e14-56d8abe68c83/590b51ac3a894.image.jpg?resize=100%2C69"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"206","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/b6/6b600127-c23e-5ab9-9e14-56d8abe68c83/590b51ac3a894.image.jpg?resize=300%2C206"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"704","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/b6/6b600127-c23e-5ab9-9e14-56d8abe68c83/590b51ac3a894.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":750,"hiresheight":1128,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/80/7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80/590b51ac612a6.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"505","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/80/7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80/590b51ac60824.image.jpg?resize=505%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/80/7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80/590b51ac60824.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"451","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/80/7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80/590b51ac60824.image.jpg?resize=300%2C451"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1540","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/80/7800ec74-f951-59b9-916a-b11771b82b80/590b51ac60824.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1715,"hiresheight":1208,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/1e/41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0/590b51ac98113.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"535","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/1e/41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0/590b51ac972e6.image.jpg?resize=760%2C535"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/1e/41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0/590b51ac972e6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"211","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/1e/41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0/590b51ac972e6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C211"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"721","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/1e/41ec8d79-63ea-5aa9-9d88-71c86cfc15c0/590b51ac972e6.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C721"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"5b067b50-6524-58f4-9bae-093f0f0d5685","body":"
\"kodner
kodner 050517

This weekend, one of the metro area\u2019s grandest gems spotlights one of its finest facets, as the St. Louis Mercantile Library hosts the 11th annual St. Louis Fine Print, Rare Book and Paper Arts Fair.

The ticketed fair runs from Friday, May 5, through Sunday, May 7, with proceeds benefiting the library\u2019s collection and conservation funds. It takes place in the J.C. Penney Conference Center on the University of Missouri-St. Louis North Campus and \u201cfills 7,000 square feet broken into two exhibit areas, with additional space for a silent auction and caf\u00e9,\u201d says Dr. Julie Dunn-Morton, endowed curator of fine art collections at the library.

According to her official library bio, Dunn-Morton earned her bachelor\u2019s degree in art history from the university and both her master\u2019s degree and doctorate from the University of Delaware. Her dissertation, intriguingly, centered on \u201cart patronage and the museum movement in St. Louis,\u201d states that bio, and since joining the museum\u2019s staff 15 years ago, she\u2019s continued researching Missouri artists and 19th-century landscape painting, as well as working on a catalogue raisonn\u00e9 devoted to Massachusetts artist/poet Frederick Oakes Sylvester.

Despite those impressive personal credentials, Dunn-Morton hastens to characterize the fair as \u201cabsolutely a team-driven event. Everyone on the Mercantile Library staff plays an important role, and we rely on our excellent docents and volunteers to help us make it all work.\u201d

The fair (whose hours and ticket prices vary) focuses on \u201cgreat works of art, historical ephemera and unique books,\u201d according to a press release from the library, which estimates the event\u2019s average attendance at more than 900 visitors.

After opening with a benefit preview party and silent auction this evening, its roster includes roughly two dozen gallerists, artists and others, roughly half of them from St. Louis and the other half from as far afield as New York City and Seattle.

Of those participants, the release adds that most belong to \u201cthe International Fine Print Dealers Association or the Antiquarian Booksellers\u2019 Association of America, organizations that hold dealers to ethical standards and practices appropriate to their field.\u201d

Briefly, Dunn-Morton reflects on how it feels to be shepherding the fair as it enters its second decade.

\u201cA milestone like the 10th anniversary is a reminder that we started this journey in response to public requests to bring a print fair back to St. Louis,\u201d she says, \u201cand now we\u2019ve built on that heritage while expanding its scope to reflect our collections and the interests of our members and visitors. It\u2019s a very exciting time to be associated with this event that brings such a unique cultural opportunity to St. Louis.\u201d

Almost necessarily, that opportunity hinges on the criteria governing the choices of participants, with which Dunn-Morton briefly deals.

\u201cOur goal is to offer quality collectible art and rare books that will appeal to collectors at all levels \u2013 from browsers to connoisseurs \u2013 and to museum curators for institutional collections,\u201d she says. \u201cWithin this overall mission, we strive to have a variety of time periods, media and styles represented so that there really is something for everyone.

\"Juliette
Juliette Travous 050517

\u201cThis year\u2019s dealers will be offering prints by John James Audubon; Thomas Hart Benton and other regionalists; Works Progress Administration artists; [and] Old Masters and modern artists. We\u2019ll also have historic maps, historic and modern photography, ephemera, original watercolors and pastels, and, of course, important first-edition books, beautiful bindings, wonderfully illustrated books and much more.\u201d

Judiciously, Dunn-Morton declines to speculate how this year\u2019s fair might differ from fairs of the past, saying only, \u201cOne thing I\u2019ve learned is that each year\u2019s fair has its own personality that results from the unique mix of dealers and materials, as well as the energy of the audience.\u201d

She does, however, discuss the general rigors of organizing the fair.

\u201cNext year\u2019s fair really begins with this year\u2019s post-event evaluation as we work to constantly improve the fair experience for our visitors and our dealers,\u201d Dunn-Morton says. \u201cSome aspects go on year-round, such as confirming venue reservations, as well as advanced planning for promotional tie-ins, like this year\u2019s fair overlapping with the annual convention of the American Alliance of Museums\u2019 annual conference here in St. Louis.\u201d Attendees of that conference, parenthetically, should note that their badges earn them complimentary admission to the fair.

\u201cWe\u2019re approached by dealers throughout the year with an interest in the fair,\u201d she continues, \u201cbut in the early fall, we send reservation information to returning dealers and invitations to new dealers. By mid-March, we have the lineup confirmed and focus on the logistics of actually presenting the event.\u201d

Dunn-Morton also gamely agrees to \u201cname a favorite child\u201d \u2013 that is, to cite what aspect of the fair most excites her personally. \u201cOne thing I always look forward to is getting to know the new dealers,\u201d she says. \u201cThis year\u2019s fair will have a contemporary print dealer, Anthony Philip Fine Art, from New York and Read\u2019Em Again Books from Montclair, Virginia, among our several new dealers.\u201d

Various local participants in the weekend\u2019s event reciprocate Dunn-Morton\u2019s enthusiasm.

For example, Jeff Appel, the owner of Chesterfield\u2019s Photography Past & Present (photographypastandpresent.com), says: \u201cI think [the event] is underappreciated, with many shortening its title to the \u2018UMSL [University of Missouri-St. Louis] art fair,\u2019 which fails to encompass the breadth of what\u2019s truly available there \u2013 and I mean no offense to art fairs.\u201d

Kirkwood artist R.H. Dick (rhdick.com) agrees. \u201cSt. Louisans need to realize that for the better part of three days in May, they have the opportunity to see some of the finest material available in rare books, prints and paper art,\u201d he says.

\u201cWhen I visit the Merc, I\u2019m almost overwhelmed by the place. I think it ranks with New York\u2019s Morgan Library & Museum, Chicago\u2019s Newberry Library and even California\u2019s Huntington Library \u2026 It\u2019s underappreciated, but the treasures it has are world-class, and there it is on the UMSL campus \u2013 who knew? It needs to be a destination visit for tourists!\u201d

Mark O. Howald of Ladue\u2019s Mark O. Howald Antiques & Fine Art (mohowald.com), who will be taking part in the event this year for the first time as a dealer instead of a fairgoer, reminisces on previously attending it over time.

\u201cThrough the years, I rarely missed a show, yet always as an onlooker \u2013 a gawker of sorts, loving the opportunity to go from booth to booth to view remarkable treasures, which included prints and paintings, maps, photographs and books, and ephemera,\u201d he says. \u201cIt was always great to see firsthand and be able to touch great pieces of art and history and, most importantly, to learn about the artists and the periods represented.

\u201cPlease come and join us,\u201d Howald urges potential attendees. \u201cI assure you, if this is your first time, it won\u2019t be your last.\u201d

Jonathan Kodner of Ladue\u2019s Kodner Gallery Fine Art (kodnergallery.com) provides an equally laudatory view. \u201cVisitors to this event have the unique and rare opportunity to interact with some of the most respected local and out-of-state professionals in the business,\u201d he says.

\u201cThe fair is the very best forum to purchase and acquire fantastic fine artwork, rare books and printed materials from around the world at the most competitive prices while benefiting the [library].\u201d

Finally, St. Charles artist Juliette Travous expresses enthusiasm for the event. \u201cAs an art lover and collector, this is the consummate show of fine prints, rare books and fine art in the St. Louis area,\u201d she says. \u201cThere\u2019s no other comparable show in the metropolitan area with the depth and breadth of fine and rare art and books of the Mercantile Library\u2019s Fine Print, Rare Book and Paper Arts Fair.\u201d

Conclusively and rhetorically, Dunn-Morton addresses someone who\u2019s never visited the library in general or the fair in particular, in hopes of tempting him or her to attend part or all of the three-day event.

\u201cThis weekend is the perfect time to visit the campus,\u201d she says, \u201cwhen you can enjoy all the fair has to offer and then experience the Mercantile\u2019s special exhibitions, \u2018Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library\u2019 and \u2018The Nature of Light: Photographs by Heidi Lopata Sherman,\u2019 along with the Missouri art collection \u2013 either on your own or during our free public tours.\u201d

St. Louis Mercantile Library, Thomas Jefferson Library Building, 1 University Blvd., St. Louis, 314-516-7240, umsl.edu/mercantile

\"lobby
lobby crowd 050517

At the end of March, the St. Louis Mercantile Library previewed its 11th-annual St. Louis Fine Print, Rare Book and Paper Arts Fair, a preview overseen by Evie Hemphill, strategic communication associate with the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Subsequently, select participants in that preview raved about the fair (which runs from May 5 to 7 at various times and for various ticket prices) and the library alike.

In introducing Chesterfield\u2019s Jeff Appel, who owns Photography Past & Present (photographypastandpresent.com), Hemphill notes, \u201cI enjoyed talking to him about how he views photography in the world of fine art \u2013 it\u2019s not necessarily the first thing people think of when it comes to collecting, but he makes a great case for it.\u201d

\u201cI\u2019m proud to be a part of such a quality event,\u201d Appel says. \u201cI\u2019ve been showing and selling both modern and vintage photographs at the Mercantile Library\u2019s Fine Print, Rare Book and Paper Arts Fair for five years and always look forward to it. Dealers come in from across the country, many with museum-quality art, and it\u2019s a great chance to see and potentially own something rare and special.\u201d

Hemphill, meanwhile, calls Kirkwood\u2019s R.H. Dick (rhdick.com) \u201ca local artist of many talents\u201d who \u201csees the event as a highlight of the year when it comes to the St. Louis cultural scene\u201d \u2013 which his own testimony establishes as something of an understatement.

\u201cWhen the Mercantile\u2019s leadership decided to sponsor such an event, I was more than happy to participate and support it, not only because I felt our city needed such an exhibit but also because this venue\u2019s really one of the most significant repositories of Americana in our nation,\u201d says the sculptor, artist and collector, who characterizes himself as a cheerleader for the library.

\u201cI\u2019ve participated in all previous 10 fairs, and as one of the vendors, I\u2019ve gotten to know other vendors, and their response \u2013 shoptalk \u2013 is positive. The pull of the fair has become truly national.\u201d

According to Hemphill, longtime auctioneer Mark O. Howald (mohowald.com) \u201copened Mark O. Howald Antiques & Fine Art on Clayton Road a couple years ago.\u201d Among the Ladue gallerist\u2019s \u201cespecially eclectic mix,\u201d she cheerily confesses that a painting of St. Louis Howald brought to the preview \u201cactually seemed contemporary to me until I noticed the date \u2013 and the lack of an arch\u00a0along the riverfront!\u201d

\u201cHaving been a part of the St. Louis arts community for over 30 years,\u201d Howald says, \u201cI\u2019m so very excited to actually \u2013 and for the first time \u2013 be taking part in this year\u2019s print and paper arts fair at the Mercantile Library as a dealer.

\u201cI\u2019ve already selected a number of pieces that I\u2019ll be exhibiting, including a rare Joe Jones lithograph, numerous works by St. Louis\u2019 own Ernest Trova, a glassblowing factory scene by Wallace Bassford and a group of ink sketches by Edwin Armstrong that depict St. Louis in the early part of the 1900s.

\u201cEven though I have a great interest in our St. Louis region, I also want to offer a few pieces that afford a glimpse into other areas of the country and world. I always liked comparing pieces from different periods of time and styles, so I\u2019ll be exhibiting both antique and contemporary works.\u201d Howald also promises \u201cvarious price levels\u201d and calls the event \u201ca remarkable opportunity for seasoned and beginning collectors.\u201d

Otherwise, Jonathan Kodner, the president and director of Ladue\u2019s Kodner Gallery Fine Art (kodnergallery.com), earns high praise from Hemphill. \u201cIn business for about 50 years now, Kodner Gallery\u2019s a relatively small, family-run enterprise located right here in St. Louis,\u201d she says, \u201cyet their reach and sheer variety of items available is stunning, at least to this layperson.\u201d

Kodner reflects on his gallery\u2019s participation in the fair from the very beginning: \u201cWe take great pride as one of the original participating dealers to use this special opportunity to reach out to our community and invite everyone to join us\u00a0\u2026 As appraisers, buyers and sellers of fine and rare 18th- through 21st-century American and European artwork from around the world, this wonderful weekend \u2026 allows us to visit with the community and show support for this landmark institution.\u201d

Kodner also references \u201csome of the most unique and unusual treasures available for purchase\u201d at the fair and adds, \u201cVisitors may have the ability to learn more about what they [already] own just by sharing their information with one of the many professionals exhibiting over the weekend.\u201d

Last but scarcely least, Hemphill introduces Juliette Travous. \u201cA resident of St. Charles, she also helps run a gallery in Clayton,\u201d Hemphill says, adding that she \u201cclearly has a passion for community interaction like the sort that happens at the print fair \u2013 as well as the artwork itself.\u201d

\u201cAs a Missouri artist,\u201d Travous says, \u201cI\u2019m extremely honored to have my paintings shown in the Mercantile Library\u2019s Fine Print, Rare Book and Paper Arts Fair alongside works by renowned Missouri artists such as Thomas Hart Benton and others from the Ste. Genevieve artist colony, as well as famous contemporary Missouri artist R.H. Dick.\u201d

Prospective fairgoers also should take note of a bonus from Travous, who says, \u201cI\u2019ll be giving a demonstration on painting with soft pastels on Sunday afternoon during the fair.\u201d

"}, {"id":"9e1c1626-3013-11e7-aac2-dbeb7ff25231","type":"article","starttime":"1493824620","starttime_iso8601":"2017-05-03T10:17:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493825234","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Tennessee Williams Festival' Expands in Second Year","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_9e1c1626-3013-11e7-aac2-dbeb7ff25231.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/tennessee-williams-festival-expands-in-second-year/article_9e1c1626-3013-11e7-aac2-dbeb7ff25231.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/tennessee-williams-festival-expands-in-second-year/article_9e1c1626-3013-11e7-aac2-dbeb7ff25231.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":6,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"In 2016, more than 2,000 people attended the inaugural Tennessee Williams Festival in St. Louis, which was held in venues throughout Grand Center in honor of one of America\u2019s greatest playwrights of the 20th century. Williams spent many of his early years in St. Louis. Such a positive response helped Festival executive artistic director Carrie Houk expand offerings to 19 distinct elements for the second annual festival, which opens Wednesday, May 3 and runs mostly through Sunday, May 7. Included are plays, live music, movies, visual arts exhibits, readings, panel discussions, contests, tours and parties. A few events will continue past May 7.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["tennessee williams","tennessee williams festival","carrie houk","grand center","stockton house","zack incubator","curtain call lounge","theater","festival"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"4dd2c486-3012-11e7-823b-d7e299f4db39","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"640","height":"427","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/dd/4dd2c486-3012-11e7-823b-d7e299f4db39/5909f25320693.image.jpg?resize=640%2C427"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/dd/4dd2c486-3012-11e7-823b-d7e299f4db39/5909f25320693.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/dd/4dd2c486-3012-11e7-823b-d7e299f4db39/5909f25320693.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/dd/4dd2c486-3012-11e7-823b-d7e299f4db39/5909f25320693.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"570f3cbe-3012-11e7-b551-f7838335e529","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"361","height":"640","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/70/570f3cbe-3012-11e7-b551-f7838335e529/5909f26299260.image.jpg?resize=361%2C640"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"177","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/70/570f3cbe-3012-11e7-b551-f7838335e529/5909f26299260.image.jpg?resize=100%2C177"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"532","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/70/570f3cbe-3012-11e7-b551-f7838335e529/5909f26299260.image.jpg?resize=300%2C532"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1815","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/70/570f3cbe-3012-11e7-b551-f7838335e529/5909f26299260.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"69f7b176-3012-11e7-8303-9309451eb888","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"500","height":"664","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9f/69f7b176-3012-11e7-8303-9309451eb888/5909f28255b6a.image.jpg?resize=500%2C664"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9f/69f7b176-3012-11e7-8303-9309451eb888/5909f28255b6a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"398","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9f/69f7b176-3012-11e7-8303-9309451eb888/5909f28255b6a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C398"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1360","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9f/69f7b176-3012-11e7-8303-9309451eb888/5909f28255b6a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2219f9b8-3012-11e7-a5d0-8725be103ca5","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"427","height":"640","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/21/2219f9b8-3012-11e7-a5d0-8725be103ca5/5909f209be2fe.image.jpg?resize=427%2C640"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/21/2219f9b8-3012-11e7-a5d0-8725be103ca5/5909f209be2fe.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/21/2219f9b8-3012-11e7-a5d0-8725be103ca5/5909f209be2fe.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1535","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/21/2219f9b8-3012-11e7-a5d0-8725be103ca5/5909f209be2fe.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2e4042ce-3012-11e7-93d8-43286c361ad8","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"500","height":"375","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/e4/2e4042ce-3012-11e7-93d8-43286c361ad8/5909f21e27911.image.jpg?resize=500%2C375"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/e4/2e4042ce-3012-11e7-93d8-43286c361ad8/5909f21e27911.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/e4/2e4042ce-3012-11e7-93d8-43286c361ad8/5909f21e27911.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/e4/2e4042ce-3012-11e7-93d8-43286c361ad8/5909f21e27911.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"413a7e30-3012-11e7-9722-e31d36d37a20","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"398","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/13/413a7e30-3012-11e7-9722-e31d36d37a20/5909f23e009a0.image.png?resize=300%2C398"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"133","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/13/413a7e30-3012-11e7-9722-e31d36d37a20/5909f23e009a0.image.png?resize=100%2C133"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"398","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/13/413a7e30-3012-11e7-9722-e31d36d37a20/5909f23e009a0.image.png?resize=300%2C398"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"1359","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/13/413a7e30-3012-11e7-9722-e31d36d37a20/5909f23e009a0.image.png"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"9e1c1626-3013-11e7-aac2-dbeb7ff25231","body":"

In 2016, more than 2,000 people attended the inaugural Tennessee Williams Festival in St. Louis, which was held in venues throughout Grand Center in honor of one of America\u2019s greatest playwrights of the 20th century. Williams spent many of his early years in St. Louis.

Such a positive response helped Festival executive artistic director Carrie Houk expand offerings to 19 distinct elements for the second annual festival, which opens Wednesday, May 3 and runs mostly through Sunday, May 7. Included are plays, live music, movies, visual arts exhibits, readings, panel discussions, contests, tours and parties. A few events will continue past May 7.

This year\u2019s event is sub-titled The Magic of the Other, a thread woven \u201cthrough all of (Williams\u2019) hundreds of plays, poems, stories and essays,\u201d according to a Festival news release. \u201cSome of us fear and reject strange people and ideas,\u201d says Houk in the release. \u201cWilliams understood that by confronting and embracing the other, we can be elevated and mysteriously transformed. This is not just the magic of theater\u2026it is the magic of the other.\u201d

\u2022 The 2017 Tennessee Williams Festival opens Wednesday, May 3 at the Curtain Call Lounge, 527 North Grand, with an opening-night performance of Bertha in Paradise. Anita Jackson reprises her role from last year\u2019s production of Hello from Bertha in The Rooming House Plays, portraying a dying prostitute who summons up the strength to serenade the paradise of earthly pleasures. The performance, which runs through May 14, will be followed on May 3 by the opening-night party.

\u2022 Will Mr. Merriwether Return From Memphis? opens Thursday, May 4 and continues through May 21 at the Stockton House, 3508 Samuel Shepard Drive, site of last year\u2019s presentation of The Rooming House Plays. It\u2019s described by TIME Magazine as \u201ca comedy as full of poetry as of pleasure\u201d and a story about women \u201cand the triumph of love found, love returned and love forgiven.\u201d The rarely performed Williams work will be directed by Jef Awada.

\u2022 Williams himself was in the cast of the original New York City run of Small Craft Warnings, described by the Festival as a \u201ckaleidoscopic pastiche of monologues delivered in a spotlight by each of the characters as the action around them becomes frozen and muted\u2026reveal(ing) their loneliness and the emptiness of their existence.\u201d It plays May 4-14 at the .ZACK venue, 3224 Locust Street.

\u2022 This year\u2019s Festival showcases several other unusual attractions, such as Deseo, an original work written by playwright Raquel Carrio and based on the characters and plot of Williams\u2019 classic drama, A Streetcar Named Desire, framing the story within the cultural codes of Latin America. The contemporary tale \u201cspeaks to the realities of Latin American immigrants in the United States,\u201d says the Festival web site (www.twstl.org) and is performed at The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive, on May 5-6 in Spanish with English super-titles.

\u2022 St. Louis Stories, a compilation of unpublished stories by Williams set in the home town of his youth, will be performed at the .ZACK on May 6 in a dramatic performance adapted for the stage by Tom Mitchell from materials in the Tennessee Williams Collection at the University of Texas-Austin.

\u2022 Broadway actress Angelica Page headlines Ensemble 2.0, a dramatic reading of a play based on Williams\u2019 niece Francesca Williams\u2019 collection of family letters. It will be staged on Monday, May 8 at the .ZACK, also incorporating music, home movies, family photos and interviews.

\u2022 Exhibits include Tennessee Williams: The Playwright and the Painter, on loan from the Key West Art & Historical Society and being displayed for only the second time outside of Key West. The 18 paintings by Williams, which show another and little-known side of his artistry, can be viewed from May 5 through July 30 at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art, 3663 Lindell Blvd.

\u2022 New Orleans-based photographer Ride Hamilton\u2019s exhibit of prints, in collaboration with stage director David Kaplan, record actors remaining in their roles backstage before an entrance or after an exit. As the Festival proclaims, it\u2019s \u201can aspect of performance unseen by the audience.\u201d Ride\u2019s exhibit will be held May 4-7 at the .ZACK.

\u2022 Naming the Dog is the title of the winning submission in the Tennessee Williams New Play Initiative, making its debut this year. Jack Ciapcak\u2019s story is about millenials living near Ferguson who attempt to cope with racial unrest and the simultaneous\u201ctask\u201d of naming their new puppy. Linda Kennedy directs the reading on Saturday, May 6 at the .ZACK.

\u2022 The Festival also is collaborating with Opera Theatre of Saint Louis for a rare performance by soprano Deanna Breiwick of Stella\u2019s aria, I Can Hardly Stand It, from Andre Previn\u2019s operatic version of A Streetcar Named Desire (performed by Union Avenue Opera a few years back). Breiwick is one of several performers taking part in the Tennessee Williams Tribute: Magic of the Other. Her performance takes place on Sunday, May 7 at the .ZACK, followed by the closing-night party at the Curtain Call Lounge.

That\u2019s an ambitious line-up of opportunities for any Williams aficionado to celebrate. For information about times, tickets and all of the events at this year\u2019s Tennessee Williams Festival, visit the Festival\u2019s web site at www.twstl.org or its Facebook page.

Photos courtesy of Ride Hamilton and ProPhotoSTL.com

"}, {"id":"5e072958-d14f-5382-889e-f21f5db03c9f","type":"article","starttime":"1493312400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-27T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493316482","priority":45,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Cheree Berry Paper Celebrates Life's Special Moments","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_5e072958-d14f-5382-889e-f21f5db03c9f.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/cheree-berry-paper-celebrates-life-s-special-moments/article_5e072958-d14f-5382-889e-f21f5db03c9f.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/cheree-berry-paper-celebrates-life-s-special-moments/article_5e072958-d14f-5382-889e-f21f5db03c9f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Brittany Nay","prologue":"St. Louis-based Cheree Berry Paper puts its stamp on the national stationery industry.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["cheree berry ppaper","stationery"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f","description":"","byline":"Photo by Ashley Gieseking","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/04/d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f/59022268e5784.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/04/d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f/59022268e48ce.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"52","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/04/d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f/59022268e48ce.image.jpg?crop=1747%2C913%2C3%2C254&resize=100%2C52&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"157","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/04/d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f/59022268e48ce.image.jpg?crop=1747%2C913%2C3%2C254&resize=300%2C157&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"535","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/04/d044917c-2ec8-5ba3-8a6b-82655501142f/59022268e48ce.image.jpg?crop=1747%2C913%2C3%2C254&resize=1024%2C535&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"1f5d856e-4ffb-536d-805d-c5eeee4c0c44","description":"","byline":"Photo by Ann K. Hubbard","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"608","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f5/1f5d856e-4ffb-536d-805d-c5eeee4c0c44/5902226881d70.image.jpg?resize=760%2C608"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"80","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f5/1f5d856e-4ffb-536d-805d-c5eeee4c0c44/5902226881d70.image.jpg?resize=100%2C80"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"240","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f5/1f5d856e-4ffb-536d-805d-c5eeee4c0c44/5902226881d70.image.jpg?resize=300%2C240"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"819","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/f5/1f5d856e-4ffb-536d-805d-c5eeee4c0c44/5902226881d70.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"5e072958-d14f-5382-889e-f21f5db03c9f","body":"
\"cheree
cheree berry paper

From classic to organic to whimsical, Cheree Berry Paper is celebrating 10 years of designing custom stationery for all of life\u2019s most memorable occasions.

St. Louis-area native Cheree Berry, who graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in design from Washington University in St. Louis, worked as a designer and art director for Kate Spade New York before launching her own paper company in her hometown in 2007. \u201cI fell in love with designing paper and realized I could actually get paid to do this,\u201d Berry says.

Through the years, Cheree Berry Paper has evolved from a custom wedding-invitation business to a company offering traditional-to-playful stationery for every occasion, including weddings, baby showers, birthday parties, nonprofit galas and corporate events. \u201cOur signature style is classic \u2013 with a twist,\u201d Berry says. The one-woman operation has grown to a staff of 22, including seven experienced graphic designers and illustrators who take inspiration from their clients to create stationery as unique as they are. \u201cWe call ourselves \u2018occasion queens,\u2019\u201d Berry says. \u201cThere is no occasion we haven\u2019t tackled.\u201d

Today, Cheree Berry Paper can be found not only on chereeberrypaper.com but also in Target stores across the nation. Berry connected with a Target buyer two years ago, and after several successful design meetings in Minneapolis, the retail chain selected the locally based paper company to be one of the faces of a chic new stationery section. The collection features both wedding and baby stationery. \u201cWe call them \u2018light do-it-yourself,\u2019 so you buy a design and fill in the facts of the party,\u201d Berry explains. \u201cAnd we still try to make them feel as custom and personalized as possible, so people know they are opening something that\u2019s unique.\u201d

The wedding lines feature save-the-date cards, thank-you notes and be-my-bridesmaid invitations, as well as cocktail napkins and paper chargers for ancillary wedding events, all designed with modern brides and grooms in mind. The baby lines include baby announcements and baby-shower invitations, such as the Swaddle Soiree design, featuring a baby-shaped card with a blanket opening to the event details. \u201cMaybe a mom is having her second baby, and she doesn\u2019t want to go custom because she\u2019s busy and being more frugal,\u201d Berry says. \u201cThese are great for showers because there are just 10 to 25 cards, and the formats are really unexpected.\u201d The designs stay in line with Cheree Berry Paper, as they showcase its signature typography and clever copywriting on every card, as well as chic gold-foil accents.

Although Cheree Berry Paper has expanded to off-the-shelf stationery, the heart of its business remains custom invitations. The company recently unveiled 40 new customizable wedding-invitation designs on its website and continues to work closely with couples who would like the stationery for their big day to be personalized from start to finish. The most popular customizable designs, which can be altered using the website\u2019s libraries of fonts, color schemes, themes, inks and envelopes, include Fit for a Queen, featuring a royal vibe for the classic bride; Wood You Marry Me, with an organic feel for the outdoorsy couple; and Rose Water, a Gothic, romantic theme for the edgier bride. Berry says the designs run the gamut of tastes, from the classic bride who wants to pull out the invitation in 10 years and still love it, to the \u201cunique\u201d bride who desires an invitation that stands out from the crowd.

When a bride and groom opt to design a custom wedding invitation, Berry selects the designer with the aesthetic most fitting for the couple. \u201cWe ask [the couple] a ton of questions to make the design as personalized as possible, from how they met to their engagement story and why they chose their wedding location,\u201d Berry says, adding that the couple is presented with two or three design options to choose from, and several rounds of revisions are made to perfect the stationery. \u201cWe want the design to be a visual representation of that couple.\u201d

Cheree Berry Paper has designed wedding, baby and special-event stationery for everyone and everything from St. Louis couples, corporations, charities and medical centers, such as St. Louis Children\u2019s Hospital, to high-profile clients, including former first daughters Chelsea Clinton and Jenna Bush Hager, Girls actress Allison Williams, Modern Family\u2019s Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt\u2019s Ellie Kemper. \u201cWe\u2019re working with people at such an emotional time, so it\u2019s so neat when you reveal the invitation, and they say, \u2018It\u2019s amazing!\u2019\u201d Berry says. \u201cThat\u2019s what keeps us running and ticking.\u201d

This summer, the company will release another new collection \u2013 a whimsical line of everyday stationery, from birthday cards to thank-you notes, slated for smaller lifestyle chain stores and local boutiques. \u201cWe\u2019re also working on some exciting new collaborations, such as a playful design for baby-moccasin company Ch\u00e9rubin,\u201d Berry says. \u201cWe plan to stay primarily in paper and maybe some home goods.\u201d Whatever the project, Cheree Berry\u2019s signature style \u2013 classic, with a twist \u2013 is sure to mark every paper product.

Cheree Berry Paper, 215 N. Meramec Ave., Second Floor, St. Louis, 314-533-6688, chereeberrypaper.com

\"cheree
cheree berry paper2
"}, {"id":"1f04b3aa-2aa2-11e7-b60a-ff634680da0c","type":"article","starttime":"1493226120","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-26T12:02:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493227312","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Much to Admire but Also Refine with 'Oedipus Apparatus': Theater Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_1f04b3aa-2aa2-11e7-b60a-ff634680da0c.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/much-to-admire-but-also-refine-with-oedipus-apparatus-theater/article_1f04b3aa-2aa2-11e7-b60a-ff634680da0c.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/much-to-admire-but-also-refine-with-oedipus-apparatus-theater/article_1f04b3aa-2aa2-11e7-b60a-ff634680da0c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":5,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: Times are tough in ancient Thebes. A plague has ravaged the city and the people are demanding action to relieve their anguish. King Oedipus sends his brother-in-law Creon to the Oracle at Delphi to ascertain what has caused these torments and what can be done to alleviate them. There\u2019s also the matter of Oedipus himself. A decade earlier he had fled Corinth, where he was raised by King Polybus and his wife Merope as their adopted son, because of a prophecy by the Oracle that Oedipus would kill his father and marry his mother. Fleeing to prevent this from happening, Oedipus made his way to Thebes.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sophocles","oedipus rex","oedipus the king","greek tragedy","fate","lucy cashion","west end players guild","aristotle","the view","mechanica","oedipus apparatus","theater","reivew","union avenue christian church"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2700,"hiresheight":1800,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/17/917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2/5900d1b3af65c.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/17/917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2/5900d1b3a8c58.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/17/917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2/5900d1b3a8c58.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/17/917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2/5900d1b3a8c58.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/17/917606c4-2aa1-11e7-a7bf-d700bbefc6c2/5900d1b3a8c58.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2700,"hiresheight":1800,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4d/b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1/5900d1ef15c1a.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4d/b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1/5900d1ef1180a.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4d/b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1/5900d1ef1180a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4d/b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1/5900d1ef1180a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/4d/b4dcafa0-2aa1-11e7-9532-0f5221b103f1/5900d1ef1180a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2700,"hiresheight":1800,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d8/3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64/5900d126d9876.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d8/3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64/5900d126d4d5c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d8/3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64/5900d126d4d5c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d8/3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64/5900d126d4d5c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/d8/3d885a26-2aa1-11e7-879d-5f9cdfaa6b64/5900d126d4d5c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2700,"hiresheight":1800,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2b/62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2/5900d16548e8b.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2b/62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2/5900d1654426c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2b/62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2/5900d1654426c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2b/62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2/5900d1654426c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2b/62badda0-2aa1-11e7-a46e-dbc905a5aae2/5900d1654426c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2700,"hiresheight":1800,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/28/0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef/5900d27164707.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/28/0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef/5900d2715fc33.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/28/0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef/5900d2715fc33.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/28/0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef/5900d2715fc33.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/28/0289b69e-2aa2-11e7-9260-f391ee4aa3ef/5900d2715fc33.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"1f04b3aa-2aa2-11e7-b60a-ff634680da0c","body":"

Story: Times are tough in ancient Thebes. A plague has ravaged the city and the people are demanding action to relieve their anguish. King Oedipus sends his brother-in-law Creon to the Oracle at Delphi to ascertain what has caused these torments and what can be done to alleviate them.

There\u2019s also the matter of Oedipus himself. A decade earlier he had fled Corinth, where he was raised by King Polybus and his wife Merope as their adopted son, because of a prophecy by the Oracle that Oedipus would kill his father and marry his mother. Fleeing to prevent this from happening, Oedipus made his way to Thebes.

Along the way, he had encountered several men on the road, killing all but one of them. He continued on to Thebes, solving the infamous \u201criddle of the Sphinx\u201d in order to gain access to the city. Subsequently he married Thebes\u2019 widowed queen Jocasta, fathering two daughters, Antigone and Ismene. All the while, Oedipus was unaware that Jocasta in reality was his mother and that he had killed his real father, Laius, among that group of men he had encountered.

While a number of figures, including the Sphinx, the blind prophet Tiresias, the goddesses Athena and Artemis and even Sigmund Freud, discuss the goings-on in Thebes and the inevitable fate of Oedipus, the king becomes increasingly testy with Creon and the unsatisfactory answers his brother-in-law keeps delivering. Jocasta spends most of her time in a reverie, while Antigone contemplates the physics of the world that may play an inexorable part in her father\u2019s future.

Highlights: Complex, challenging but also at times torturous, Oedipus Apparatus adapted by Lucy Cashion is an intriguing if flawed concept being given its world premiere as the concluding presentation of West End Players Guild\u2019s 106th season.

Other Info: Cashion\u2019s work often lumbers along like the giant wheel or \u201capparatus\u201d so ingeniously incorporated into the elaborate set designed by Cashion, Kristin Cassidy, Joe Taylor, Jacob Francois and Ben Lewis. That design stretches the normally confined performing area in the basement at Union Avenue Christian Church into where West End usually has its lobby.

A construction piece (or is that the apparatus?) is moved back and forth along the main performance floor throughout the presentation, pushed by various characters involved in the story. At stage right sits Taylor, performing accompanying music while also essaying the role of Artemis\u2019 twin brother and god, Apollo, from time to time. Meredith LaBounty\u2019s costumes dress the characters in classically ancient Greek attire apart from the Victorian wardrobe sported by Freud.

Cashion has based Oedipus Apparatus primarily on Sophocles\u2019 tragedy, Oedipus the King, but also weaves bits from Aristotle\u2019s Mechanica, a Buddhist\u2019s guided meditation on death from YouTube and even a cheeky take-off on the TV talk program, The View. The panelists on The View spoof sit on the stage at one end of the playing area, opposite Jocasta\u2019s living quarters at the other.

Oedipus Apparatus begins intriguingly enough, as Antigone wanders about while she contemplates the intricacies of physics, oblivious to her pre-occupied father and distant mother. The introduction of various elements of the show is beguiling to fascinate and welcome further exploration.

A major problem, however, is also a key element of Cashion\u2019s adaptation. As she describes it in the company\u2019s news release, \u201cFrom the beginning, the play moves along a laid-out track, like a speeding train. The characters are entirely out of time to change anything\u2026But this speeding train is not a perfect machine. It gets stuck\u2026and it must restart (five times actually).\u201d

Those lumbering disruptions prove tedious well before the one-act drama concludes its more than 90-minute presentation. That many repetitions beat the point of inevitability into the ground, leaving an observer longing for a less obvious way to resolve the drama, or at least a more expedient one.

On the positive side, Cashion\u2019s original dialogue is witty and well served by her strong cast, each of whom involves herself/himself into roles with flair and arched delivery. Mitch Eagles leads the ensemble in the title role and well captures both the arrogance and confusion of Oedipus.

Will Bonfiglio is appropriately frustrated and miffed as the put-upon Creon, who becomes the scapegoat of the thin-skinned Oedipus (any relation to current world leaders is perhaps coincidental). Maggie Conroy as Jocasta has little to do until the last fourth of the play, when she frantically realizes that a prophecy she and Laius fought so hard to avoid has actually come to pass.

Alicen Moser portrays Antigone as a bright, curious and affable child, welcoming visitors to her parents\u2019 kingdom and also showing a knack for the physical sciences. As the glib prophet Tiresias, Carl Overly Jr. showcases his polished comic touch both in badinage with other panelists and also in exasperating encounters with the unobservant Oedipus.

Ellie Schwetye serves well as the dangerous Sphinx, both in her conversation with Oedipus and also as host of the other-worldly confab, while Rachel Tibbetts wanders dutifully around the floor as the goddess of wisdom Athena.

Cara Barresi prowls the stage as the goddess Artemis, frequently propelling that giant apparatus of fate across the performance area, while Michael Cassidy Flynn\u2019s Freud fits right in with gods and goddesses discussing his theory of the Oedipal complex and chortling along with the others at pithy comments.

There\u2019s much to admire in Cashion\u2019s Oedipus Apparatus, as well as recommendations to further refine her treatise to lessen its bludgeoning affect in order to keep an audience\u2019s interest throughout. Two or three repetitions would work as well as five and make the welcome conclusion sharper.

Play: Oedipus Apparatus

Group: West End Players Guild

Venue: Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 Union Blvd.

Dates: April 27-30

Tickets: $20; contact 367-0025 or WestEndPlayers.org

Rating: A 3.5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of John Lamb

"}, {"id":"928f6bc0-29db-11e7-9475-63bc04dfa883","type":"article","starttime":"1493140860","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-25T12:21:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493141616","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"ERA's 'Twelfth Period' Shows How Shakespeare Remains Relevant Today: Theater Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_928f6bc0-29db-11e7-9475-63bc04dfa883.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/era-s-twelfth-period-shows-how-shakespeare-remains-relevant-today/article_928f6bc0-29db-11e7-9475-63bc04dfa883.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/era-s-twelfth-period-shows-how-shakespeare-remains-relevant-today/article_928f6bc0-29db-11e7-9475-63bc04dfa883.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: Melding together Shakespeare\u2019s comedy, Twelfth Night, with a number of pop cultural references from the 1990s, Twelfth Period focuses on Sebastian Horowitz, a senior at Illyria Preparatory Academy who actually is his sister Viola in disguise of the missing Sebastian. She\u2019s in love with another student, \u2018Dude\u2019 Orsino, who in turn is smitten with Olivia Davenport, a senior whose brother recently was killed in an auto accident. While Olivia mourns her brother, fellow students Toby Belch, Maria Smith and Andrew Aguecheek are driven primarily by the need for a good time and as little studying as possible. The good-natured but gullible Andrew, easily swayed by Toby and Maria, is admired by another student named Valentine.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["era","equally represented arts","centene center","centene center for arts and education","grand center","shakespeare","shake 38","twelfth night","twelfth period or not another twelfth night","twelfth period","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1365,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41/58ff8538e46fa.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41/58ff8538e2f23.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41/58ff8538e2f23.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41/58ff8538e2f23.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/51/651fbb04-29db-11e7-88ce-dbe9dce08d41/58ff8538e2f23.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1365,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/46/7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec/58ff85528a7a0.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/46/7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec/58ff855288fe7.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/46/7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec/58ff855288fe7.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/46/7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec/58ff855288fe7.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/46/7466c9d6-29db-11e7-9a80-0b35673b99ec/58ff855288fe7.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"7f8c548e-29db-11e7-886b-6313b05ef3f6","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"281","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f8c548e-29db-11e7-886b-6313b05ef3f6/58ff85653f7b1.image.jpg?resize=760%2C281"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"37","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f8c548e-29db-11e7-886b-6313b05ef3f6/58ff85653f7b1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C37"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"111","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f8c548e-29db-11e7-886b-6313b05ef3f6/58ff85653f7b1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C111"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"379","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f8c548e-29db-11e7-886b-6313b05ef3f6/58ff85653f7b1.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"928f6bc0-29db-11e7-9475-63bc04dfa883","body":"

Story: Melding together Shakespeare\u2019s comedy, Twelfth Night, with a number of pop cultural references from the 1990s, Twelfth Period focuses on Sebastian Horowitz, a senior at Illyria Preparatory Academy who actually is his sister Viola in disguise of the missing Sebastian.

She\u2019s in love with another student, \u2018Dude\u2019 Orsino, who in turn is smitten with Olivia Davenport, a senior whose brother recently was killed in an auto accident. While Olivia mourns her brother, fellow students Toby Belch, Maria Smith and Andrew Aguecheek are driven primarily by the need for a good time and as little studying as possible. The good-natured but gullible Andrew, easily swayed by Toby and Maria, is admired by another student named Valentine.

Toby, Maria and Andrew are involved in a particularly nasty bit of hazing of fellow student Mal Olio, convincing her that Olivia is in love with her through a letter written by Maria in Olivia\u2019s handwriting and left for Mal to find. They leave specific details for Mal to follow in her \u2018wooing\u2019 of Olivia before locking her away in the school\u2019s dark room.

Pranks such as the aforementioned run counter to Illyria\u2019s motto, \u201cWhere some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.\u201d Driving home this point is school principal Melanie Feste and teachers at the academy. As the faculty and administration allow students to prepare for the school\u2019s annual prom, the consequences of the cruel ruse played on Mal become soberly realized.

Highlights: Equally Represented Arts presents a new take on Shakespeare\u2019s enduring comedy of disguise, deception and love with this fresh and agreeable blend of Twelfth Night and modern pop culture, circa 1999. It\u2019s Fast Times at Ridgemont High updated and invigorated with lively performances by an energized cast.

Other Info: ERA cleverly moves its audience throughout several floors at the Centene Center for Arts and Education as we \u201cattend\u201d classes at Illyria from first assembly through 7th period, including \u201cstudy hall\u201d or intermission. Just like kids do, the principal (Anna Skidis Vargas) is tuned out on the dais by the students with a barrage of rock tunes from the likes of Smash Mouth, Fiona Apple and several other groups that fill the kids\u2019 ears.

While we\u2019re in English class, sex ed or gym, the audience observes Toby, Maria and Andrew do everything but study and pay attention, even sharing a warm Stag beer or two with them on the Centene balcony. All the while, the text adaptation by ERA is filled with dialogue from teen films including Clueless, Ten Things I Hate About You, Rushmore, Election, Mean Girls, She\u2019s All That, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and even the Oscar-winning adult drama, American Beauty.

Lines from those movies are seamlessly integrated into The Bard\u2019s story. ERA also addresses the historically shabby treatment of Malvolio, here more sympathetically etched in the person of eager student Mal Olio, although its resolution decidedly moves Twelfth Period from comedy to tragedy by strict Shakespearean standards.

Gabe Taylor\u2019s direction is leisurely but well focused, keeping the diverse threads of Shakespeare\u2019s original tale and the rom-com adaptation both easily identifiable and relevant to the show\u2019s integrated plot. Taylor also provides the production design and sound design, keeping those \u201890s tunes popping up at advantageous times. Erik Kuhn adds lighting, highlighted in the prom scene.

The intrepid ensemble, all in fine comic form as well as adaptable to moments of melancholy, includes Erin Renee Roberts as the much admired Olivia, Amanda Wales as the love-struck Sebastian/Viola, Andrew Kuhlman as slacker Toby Belch, Tyson Cole as the easily duped Andrew Aguecheek and Francesa Ferrari as the conniving Maria.

Also involved in this intriguing enterprise are Katy Keating as the misguided and manipulated Mal Olio, Jonah Walker as stylish Dude Orsino and Erik Kuhn as the unobtrusive Valentine. Anna Skidis Vargas is amusing as all of the adults, from the tuned-out principal to patient English teacher to jock phys-ed coach.

Twelfth Period might better be titled Twelfth Grade to identify with its senior class constituents, but that\u2019s a minor point. This ERA presentation, which was part of the area\u2019s contributions to Shakespeare Festival St. Louis\u2019 Shake 38 event, is an amusing and enjoyable romp (apart from its sadder moments) that demonstrates how The Bard remains relevant to curious kids even today.

Play: Twelfth Period, or Not Another Twelfth Night

Company: Equally Represented Arts

Venue: Centene Center for Arts and Education, 3547 Olive Street

Dates: April 26-28, May 3-6

Tickets: $15-$20; visit www.artful.ly/era or eratheatre.org

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of ERA

"}, {"id":"c86bb7b2-2936-11e7-938e-1f25c10f4acc","type":"article","starttime":"1493070060","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-24T16:41:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493314367","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: The Lion King","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_c86bb7b2-2936-11e7-938e-1f25c10f4acc.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-the-lion-king/article_c86bb7b2-2936-11e7-938e-1f25c10f4acc.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-the-lion-king/article_c86bb7b2-2936-11e7-938e-1f25c10f4acc.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":8,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"Based on the 1994 Disney film of the same name,\u00a0The Lion King\u00a0is a magnificent spectacle of a show.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["disney","walt disney","elton john","tim rice","the lion king","musical","theater","review","julie taymor"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1365,"hiresheight":1024,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/4a/c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662/58fe6dab4320f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"480","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/4a/c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662/58fe6dab419dd.image.jpg?crop=1353%2C854%2C5%2C165&resize=760%2C480&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/4a/c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662/58fe6dab419dd.image.jpg?crop=1351%2C923%2C5%2C96&resize=100%2C68&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"205","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/4a/c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662/58fe6dab419dd.image.jpg?crop=1351%2C923%2C5%2C96&resize=300%2C205&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"700","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/4a/c4aa66ca-2934-11e7-b2b6-2b904856c662/58fe6dab419dd.image.jpg?crop=1351%2C923%2C5%2C96&resize=1024%2C700&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd","description":"","byline":"Joan Marcus","hireswidth":2048,"hiresheight":1536,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/89/b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd/58fe6d970e003.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"570","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/89/b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd/58fe6d970cd8c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C570"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/89/b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd/58fe6d970cd8c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/89/b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd/58fe6d970cd8c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/89/b89dddc6-2934-11e7-bbfd-c767a9f1b3dd/58fe6d970cd8c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}},{"id":"d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1365,"hiresheight":1024,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/1a/d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0/58fe6dc108f77.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"570","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/1a/d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0/58fe6dc107432.image.jpg?resize=760%2C570"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/1a/d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0/58fe6dc107432.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/1a/d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0/58fe6dc107432.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/1a/d1a2ccc8-2934-11e7-adac-fbe41acc87a0/58fe6dc107432.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}},{"id":"4d7745d2-2934-11e7-b5c4-cf732b71b201","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"401","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d7/4d7745d2-2934-11e7-b5c4-cf732b71b201/58fe6ce344d13.image.jpg?resize=760%2C401"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d7/4d7745d2-2934-11e7-b5c4-cf732b71b201/58fe6ce344d13.image.jpg?resize=100%2C53"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"158","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d7/4d7745d2-2934-11e7-b5c4-cf732b71b201/58fe6ce344d13.image.jpg?resize=300%2C158"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"540","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/d7/4d7745d2-2934-11e7-b5c4-cf732b71b201/58fe6ce344d13.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C540"}}},{"id":"577f335a-2934-11e7-a186-1be461a0ae95","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"401","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/77/577f335a-2934-11e7-a186-1be461a0ae95/58fe6cf41b2aa.image.jpg?resize=760%2C401"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/77/577f335a-2934-11e7-a186-1be461a0ae95/58fe6cf41b2aa.image.jpg?resize=100%2C53"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"158","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/77/577f335a-2934-11e7-a186-1be461a0ae95/58fe6cf41b2aa.image.jpg?resize=300%2C158"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"540","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/77/577f335a-2934-11e7-a186-1be461a0ae95/58fe6cf41b2aa.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C540"}}},{"id":"954ad586-2934-11e7-8d53-6f18cafc2334","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"401","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/954ad586-2934-11e7-8d53-6f18cafc2334/58fe6d5bbfea6.image.jpg?resize=760%2C401"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/954ad586-2934-11e7-8d53-6f18cafc2334/58fe6d5bbfea6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C53"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"158","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/954ad586-2934-11e7-8d53-6f18cafc2334/58fe6d5bbfea6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C158"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"540","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/54/954ad586-2934-11e7-8d53-6f18cafc2334/58fe6d5bbfea6.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C540"}}},{"id":"9c7f322a-2934-11e7-95b5-8391c4718b80","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"401","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c7/9c7f322a-2934-11e7-95b5-8391c4718b80/58fe6d67d56c5.image.jpg?resize=760%2C401"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"53","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c7/9c7f322a-2934-11e7-95b5-8391c4718b80/58fe6d67d56c5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C53"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"158","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c7/9c7f322a-2934-11e7-95b5-8391c4718b80/58fe6d67d56c5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C158"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"540","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/c7/9c7f322a-2934-11e7-95b5-8391c4718b80/58fe6d67d56c5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C540"}}},{"id":"aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c","description":"","byline":"\u00a92013 Joan Marcus","hireswidth":1365,"hiresheight":1024,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/a0/aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c/58fe6d7e94995.hires.jpg","presentation":null,"versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"570","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/a0/aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c/58fe6d7e93310.image.jpg?resize=760%2C570"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/a0/aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c/58fe6d7e93310.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/a0/aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c/58fe6d7e93310.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/a0/aa0af85c-2934-11e7-ae47-4ba19b14400c/58fe6d7e93310.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C768"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"c86bb7b2-2936-11e7-938e-1f25c10f4acc","body":"

Story: Head lion Mufasa rules Pride Rock as \u201cking of the beasts.\u201d He presides over a flourishing kingdom, loved by his queen Sarabi but despised by his younger brother Scar. When Mufasa\u2019s and Sarabi\u2019s cub son is born, \u2018Simba\u2019 is presented to the other animals by the wise mandrill Rafiki as part of \u201cThe Circle of Life.\u201d

Scar resents that Mufasa is king and is further angered that young Simba now is heir to the throne. Over time Scar plots various ways to murder Mufasa, finally succeeding when he lures Simba into a stampede of wildebeests. Mufasa rescues Simba but dies after Scar pushes him back into the stampede. Scar quickly ascends the throne with a menacing group of hyenas as his henchmen.

Simba is convinced by Scar that the lad caused his father\u2019s death and at Scar\u2019s urging flees into the countryside. Unknown to Scar, the hyenas fail to follow his orders to kill young Simba, letting the cub escape into the jungle.

There Simba is rescued and raised by the wise-cracking meerkat Timon and his pal, an affable warthog named Pumbaa. When Pumbaa years later is stalked by a lioness in desperate need of food, she turns out to be Simba\u2019s childhood sweetheart Nala. She convinces Simba to return home and reclaim the throne from his treacherous uncle, who has destroyed the once-flourishing pride land.

Highlights: Based on the 1994 Disney film of the same name, The Lion King is a magnificent spectacle of a show. The eye-popping, jaw-dropping puppetry designed by director Julie Taymor and Michael Curry has dazzled audiences for more than 8,000 performances on Broadway since The Lion King opened in 1997 following a tryout in Minneapolis.

The show has since spawned tours nationwide as well as in several foreign countries. Its six Tony Awards were well earned for direction, sets, costumes, lighting and choreography as well as Best Musical.

Other Info: The current production at The Fox marks the fourth time the touring version has played here, following stops in 2003, 2007 and 2012. The show retains its considerable magic and wonder, with a book by Roger Allers and Irene Mecchi that hearkens to Hamlet and features such Disney staples as the affable friends of the hero, in this case Timon and Poomba, who share the lion\u2019s share of the jokes with Zazu the hornbill bird, Musafa\u2019s advisor.

The beauty of The Lion King lies in the breathtaking artistry of the masks and puppets, creations that took the staggering total of more than 17,000 hours to assemble for the original Broadway production. The show is the third-longest running musical ever on Broadway and the highest-grossing Broadway production of all time, with more than $1 billion in revenue. It\u2019s also the top-earning title in box-office history for both stage and cinema.

Performers who maneuver the puppets speak in unison with their animal counterparts, achieving a stereo effect of sorts in the presentation. Their flair is enhanced by the resplendent costumes designed by Taymor, complemented by a rainbow of hues incorporated into Michael Ward\u2019s hair and makeup design.

Richard Hudson\u2019s scenic design focuses on the Prime Rock locale, aided by screens that depict various jungle aspects such as a waterfall, a river and even the African veldt. All of it is sumptuously illuminated by Donald Holder\u2019s lighting design, which features a shimmering sun as well as a night sky filled with sparkling stars. Steve Canyon Kennedy adds a supportive sound design.

Garth Fagan\u2019s choreography is effervescent and vibrant throughout, inspired by the infectious mingling of African rhythms and South African music with American pop styles. The show\u2019s enchanting score is an intricate collaboration fusing the primary compositions of Elton John with the lyrics of Tim Rice and enhanced by the contributions of Lebo M, Mark Mancina, Jay Rifkin, Julie Taymor and Hans Zimmer. It blends several songs from the 1994 movie with tunes written specifically for the musical.

Fine singing accentuates the production as well, led by the glorious pipes of Mukelisiwe Goba on the packed media night as the wise mandrill Rafiki (Buyi Zama repeats her 2012 role in most performances). She leads the introductory Circle of Life number as puppeteers in animal costumes cascade down the aisles of The Fox onto the stage before wide-eyed children and their adult counterparts.

Young Simba, alternately portrayed by Devin Graves and Jordan Williams, and Young Nala, who is played in rotation by Grier Burke and Meilani Cisneros, have a grand time with the rambunctious I Just Can\u2019t Wait to Be King, while Tiffany Denise Hobbs, Keith Bennett and Robbie Swift (the latter two reprising their roles from the 2012 tour) get into their antics as the trio of lazy hyenas on Chow Down.

Mark Campbell is appropriately menacing, sneering his way as the ambitious Scar, while Gerald Ramsey is properly regal as the kind-hearted Mufasa, who teaches Simba about the delicate balance of nature that includes even vultures. Sophia Stephens plays Mufasa's beloved queen Sarabi.

Deshaun Young and Nia Holloway showcase their athleticism as well as their musical chops as the adult Simba and Nala, respectively. Drew Hirschfield masterfully mines the droll humor of the prim and proper hornbill Zazu, while Nick Cordileone and Ben Lipitz once again keep audiences chuckling as the glib Timon and his amiable chum Pumbaa, teaching Simba their joie de vivre approach on the rollicking Act I finale, Hakuna Matata.

The Lion King takes a serviceable story and elevates it to superior art with the fastidious, meticulous direction and dedication by Taymor and her immensely talented colleagues. It's still a visual and auditory feast for the senses.

Musical: The Lion King

Group: Touring Company

Venue: The Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Blvd.

Dates: Through May 7

Tickets: $55-$199; contact 534-1111 or metrotix.com

Rating: A 5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Matthew Murphy, Joan Marcus, The Lion King

"}, {"id":"30db0052-2935-11e7-9656-f70630fce755","type":"article","starttime":"1493069400","starttime_iso8601":"2017-04-24T16:30:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1493918064","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_30db0052-2935-11e7-9656-f70630fce755.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-men-are-from-mars-women-are-from/article_30db0052-2935-11e7-9656-f70630fce755.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-men-are-from-mars-women-are-from/article_30db0052-2935-11e7-9656-f70630fce755.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"Actor/comedian Amadeo Fusca is the star and driving force of this one-man show.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["westport plaza","westport playhouse","playhouse at westport plaza","men are from mars, women are from venus","john gray","amadeo fusca","comedy","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":"","images":[{"id":"04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Emery Entertainment","hireswidth":1920,"hiresheight":1090,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/47/04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125/58fe6e1643bbd.hires.png","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"760","height":"431","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/47/04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125/58fe6e1641363.image.png?resize=760%2C431"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/47/04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125/58fe6e1641363.image.png?crop=1680%2C1074%2C3%2C3&resize=100%2C64&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/47/04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125/58fe6e1641363.image.png?crop=1680%2C1074%2C3%2C3&resize=300%2C192&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"655","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/47/04706b56-2935-11e7-ad3d-9bf4cb67f125/58fe6e1641363.image.png?crop=1680%2C1074%2C3%2C3&resize=1024%2C655&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84","description":"","byline":"Photos courtesy of Emery Entertainment","hireswidth":1920,"hiresheight":1090,"hiresurl":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/9b/19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84/58fe6e3a03e93.hires.png","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"760","height":"431","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/9b/19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84/58fe6e3a01528.image.png?resize=760%2C431"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"57","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/9b/19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84/58fe6e3a01528.image.png?resize=100%2C57"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"170","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/9b/19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84/58fe6e3a01528.image.png?resize=300%2C170"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"581","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/9b/19bd9970-2935-11e7-adb5-7b48f0588d84/58fe6e3a01528.image.png?resize=1024%2C581"}}},{"id":"e0165b30-2934-11e7-8a17-57fc0ed6545b","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"227","height":"372","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/01/e0165b30-2934-11e7-8a17-57fc0ed6545b/58fe6dd9425b6.image.jpg?resize=227%2C372"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"164","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/01/e0165b30-2934-11e7-8a17-57fc0ed6545b/58fe6dd9425b6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C164"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"492","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/01/e0165b30-2934-11e7-8a17-57fc0ed6545b/58fe6dd9425b6.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1678","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/01/e0165b30-2934-11e7-8a17-57fc0ed6545b/58fe6dd9425b6.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"30db0052-2935-11e7-9656-f70630fce755","body":"

Story: Adapted by Eric Coble from the best-selling, non-fiction book of the same title by relationship counselor John Gray, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus Live! is a comic look at the ever-contested battle of the sexes and how men and women view almost everything differently.

Highlights: Actor/comedian Amadeo Fusca is the star and driving force of this one-man show. The off-Broadway hit uses Gray\u2019s immensely popular book from 1992 as the launching pad for a blend of Fusca\u2019s stand-up routine of jokes about the differences between men and women with a theatrical storyline that incorporates video representations of Gray\u2019s observations.

Fusca\u2019s dry delivery and references to his relationship with his wife Sarah provide sufficient laughs to entertain the show\u2019s adult audience for nearly two hours.

Other Info: Fusca\u2019s amiable personality is important to the presentation, which also utilizes humorous animation sequences by Bazillion Pictures. With modest props and setting the genial Pittsburgh native proceeds to regale his audience with tales from his own adventures with Sarah, both before and during marriage.

His delivery often is downplayed, which serves effectively to heighten the humor in his stories, such as when he talks about opening \u201ca bottle of Mer-lott\u201d to impress his then-date Sarah. Fusca often returns to the mantra of women needing \u201cattention and understanding\u201d while men are motivated by \u201ct and a\u201d -- namely, trust and approval. It\u2019s important to know that, he says, when considering their differences.

For example, he is puzzled when Sarah says she has \u201cnothing to wear,\u201d as he observes two closets filled with her clothes. He notes that when he himself says he has nothing to wear that means he needs to rummage through dirty laundry to pick out the cleanest items headed for the washer.

Guys like sports whereas gals sometimes prefer opera, which sets up a routine about Fusca trying to catch glimpses of his beloved Pittsburgh Penguins in a National Hockey League Stanley Cup playoff game on his smart phone while seated next to Sarah, as he ostensibly is paying attention to performers singing in strange languages at the New York Met. \u00a0After paying a king's ransom for parking, as he notes.

Bazillion\u2019s cartoons frequently are interspersed with videotaped commentary by a smiling Gray addressing the sundry differences between the sexes a tad like a smarmy talk show host. While Gray is presented as a well-tailored and academic \u2018voice of reason,\u2019 his appearance sets up a humorous contrast to the \u2018Everyman\u2019 Fusca when the latter returns to the stage with his familiar look of bewilderment.

The opening-night audience was largely appreciative of Fusca\u2019s hard-working efforts, as the comedian spends considerable time and energy on stage in what is essentially an elongated stand-up routine. Coupled with a lengthy intermission, the show runs a little less than two hours under Mindy Cooper\u2019s direction.

This bit of fluff based on Dr. Gray\u2019s phenomenally successful book is lightweight but often amusing, made all the more palatable by Fusca and his welcome charm and nicely honed gift for comic delivery.

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus did well enough at the Playhouse at Westport Plaza last year to convince Emery Entertainment to line up this return engagement. Time will tell if audiences, male or female, enjoy it as much the second time around. For some of us, once is enough.

Show: Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus Live!

Company: Emery Entertainment

Venue: The Playhouse at Westport Plaza, 635 Westport Plaza

Dates: April 26-30, May 4-7

Tickets: $50 (discounts available); contact 534-1111 or www.metrotix.com

Rating: A 3 on a scale of 1-to-5.

"} ]