[ {"id":"1abc8e7d-a480-56c2-aded-509986cdd90d","type":"article","starttime":"1526576400","starttime_iso8601":"2018-05-17T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1526578164","priority":45,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Making It New","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_1abc8e7d-a480-56c2-aded-509986cdd90d.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/making-it-new/article_1abc8e7d-a480-56c2-aded-509986cdd90d.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/making-it-new/article_1abc8e7d-a480-56c2-aded-509986cdd90d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":5,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. 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\"Jorgensen

Andrew Jorgensen

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis seems poised to enjoy a particularly eventful late spring and early summer.

In addition to launching its 2018 festival season the Saturday after this issue hits stands \u2013 28 performances, among them six matinees and a concert, between May 19 and June 24 \u2013 the troupe will greet new leadership at the start of July.

Early last month, an international search culminated in the troupe\u2019s announcement that Andrew Jorgensen will become its next general director. Only the fourth in its 43 years, he will succeed Timothy O\u2019Leary on July 2. Jorgensen currently serves with the Washington National Opera in the U.S. capital.

In ironic circumstances reminiscent of the chess stratagem of castling, after leaving St. Louis, O\u2019Leary, who was named the local troupe\u2019s general director almost a decade ago, will join Jorgensen\u2019s former troupe in Washington, D.C.

Jorgensen first viewed the local troupe and experienced its work in 2013, a press release noted, and has \u201csince returned to the festival every season.\u201d

Before his tenure with the Washington National Opera, Jorgensen served with New York City\u2019s famed Metropolitan Opera. Prior to that, his career began in the vocal division of Columbia Artists Management, a New York-based international talent management agency.

Before even that, Jorgensen pursued undergraduate studies at Cambridge, Massachusetts\u2019 storied Harvard University and earned a Master of Business Administration degree from New York University\u2019s Stern School of Business.

Raised in the southern New Jersey borough of Haddonfield, Jorgensen will move from the Washington, D.C., area to St. Louis with his husband and their dog, charmingly named Aria.

Otherwise, select details on each of the five productions in the troupe\u2019s 2018 festival season under O\u2019Leary\u2019s guidance follow:

\"LaTraviata_PosterArtwork_SimpleLayers.jpg\"
LaTraviata_PosterArtwork_SimpleLayers.jpg
\"Regina_Original.jpg\"
Regina_Original.jpg
\"AmSoldier_KeyArt_Final
AmSoldier_KeyArt_Final small.jpg
\"OTSL_ShowArt18_O&E_Final.jpg\"
OTSL_ShowArt18_O&E_Final.jpg

\u2022 La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi | May 19, 25 and 30; June 2, 7, 10, 20 and 23 | Christopher Allen, conductor, Patricia Racette, director: A Parisian courtesan carefully maintains her emotional and other freedom till she meets a na\u00eff whose sincerity compels her to contemplate an unthinkable sacrifice involving pride, love and honor in star soprano Racette\u2019s directorial debut. It stars Sydney Mancasola as Violetta, Geoffrey Agpalo as Alfredo, Joo Won Kang as Germont and Briana Hunter as Flora.

\u2022 Regina by Marc Blitzstein | May 26 and 31; June 6, 8, 16, 20 and 24 | Stephen Lord, conductor, James Robinson, director: This scandalous entertainment involving ambition, theft, blackmail and \u2013 oh, yes \u2013 murder derives from The Little Foxes, Lillian Hellman\u2019s classic 1939 play, and presents a Southern backdrop of spirituals, jazz and ragtime wherein siblings and spouses battle among themselves for a family business. It stars Susan Graham as the title character, James Morris as Ben Hubbard, Ron Raines as Oscar Hubbard and Melody Wilson as Addie.

\u2022 An American Soldier by Huang Ruo and David Henry Hwang | June 3, 6, 9, 14, 16 and 22 | Michael Christie, conductor, Matthew Ozawa, director: The son of Chinese immigrants proudly enlists in the U.S. Army, eager to serve his country, but his own Afghan base subsequently becomes enemy territory when military hazing turns deadly in this based-on-a-true-story inquiry into what it means to be an American. This world premiere stars Andrew Stenson as Danny Chen, Wayne Tigges as Sgt. Aaron Marcum, Mika Shigematsu as Mother Chen and Kathleen Kim as Josephine Young.

\u2022 Orfeo and Euridice by Christoph Willibald Gluck | June 9, 13, 15, 17, 21 and 23 | Pierre Vallet, conductor, Ron Daniels, director: The classical Greek myth of the poet/musician Orpheus undergoes adaptation by an 18th-century German composer for a contemporary American audience and focuses on soulmates doomed by the protagonist\u2019s own passion in a celebration of love and musical transcendence. Intriguingly, it stars Jennifer Johnson Cano as Orfeo, Andriana Chuchman as Euridice and Maria Valdes as Amore.

\u2022 Center Stage (concert) | June 19 | Stephen Lord, conductor, James Robinson, director: The kliegs shine on rising operatic talents from across the U.S. in a one-night-only event featuring members of Opera Theatre of Saint Louis\u2019 nationally acclaimed young-artist programs, performing some of opera\u2019s greatest hits and cherished rarities, accompanied onstage by members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

All Opera Theatre of Saint Louis productions are sung in English, accompanied by members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and staged at Webster University\u2019s Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts.

Also, according to the troupe\u2019s press release, no less an \u00e9minence gris than The Times of London once praised Opera Theatre of Saint Louis as \u201cone of the few American companies worth the transatlantic fare.\u201d

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, 210 Hazel Ave., St. Louis, 314-961-0644, experienceopera.org

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JDevotiTrattoriaHiRes-01.jpg

A longstanding restaurant just last month reimagined itself in the St. Louis neighborhood known as, simply, The Hill, when J. Devoti Trattoria transformed from Five Bistro, plating modern farm-to-table Italian.

Chef-owner Anthony Devoti named the restaurant and its continuing market counterpart, J. Devoti Grocery, after his great-grandfather, Joseph Devoti \u2013 an Italian immigrant who opened a grocery on The Hill in 1906.

\u201cWe\u2019ve done Five Bistro for 12 years, and I\u2019d been wanting to do something different but still maintain the same beliefs that we had at Five,\u201d Devoti says. \u201cIt\u2019s a little bit of our family history mixed in with the same farm-to-table experience we were offering before in a beautiful atmosphere.\u201d

Devoti worked with longtime friend Aaron Bunse to develop the feel for the revamped dining room, which features a fresh coat of paint and a collection of framed photographs. The spread includes old family photos of Devoti\u2019s great-grandfather, as well as images of New York, San Francisco and St. Louis \u2013 all places where Devoti has lived and worked. His wife also contributed her own pictures of Italy for the walls.

\u201cIt\u2019s become a little more personal here,\u201d Devoti says. \u201cWe put our name on the window, and we\u2019re representing our family and places I\u2019ve lived and grown as far as being a cook goes. And I just love that you can come here on a date, on a business meeting or bring the whole family.\u201d

The main dining room seats roughly 50 guests, while the grocery area incorporates a table for private parties seating up to 20 guests. The next phase of the restaurant\u2019s development involves a garden on the patio, where Devoti plans to plant flowers and vegetables alike.

From the menu \u2013 which, like the one at Five Bistro, changes daily based on the availability of fresh, locally curated ingredients \u2013 guests can still order a few favorites from J. Devoti Trattoria\u2019s precursor, among them a house burger featuring ground beef, lamb and pork, Sangamon Double Cream from Fithian, Illinois\u2019 Ludwig Farmstead Creamery, 24-hour pork belly, a fried chicken egg, greens and pickles. According to Devoti, the kitchen also still offers sous chef Mark Mulitsch\u2019s thoughtfully prepared local cheese and charcuterie plates.

Recently, otherwise, a sourdough wheat pizza base came topped with goat cheese from Bloomsdale, Missouri\u2019s acclaimed Baetje Farms, olives, nettles and chili flake. Also recently, house-made ravioli came stuffed with local cheese topped with J.T. Gelineau pea shoots and Missouri pecans.

Behind the bar, Jacob Nord curates a seasonal cocktail/beer list that focuses on supporting local producers. Guests can enjoy six draft beers (as well as a list of smaller production wines).

\u201cYou can get a high-quality meal here and dine on food that\u2019s produced locally in our region,\u201d Devoti says. \u201cOne hundred and twenty five miles away from the city is the farthest that we go. You can feel proud about supporting local farms and breweries and these guys who are working every day to make a living, and the folks who used to come before [to Five Bistro] don\u2019t have to be worried about their favorite charcuterie plate not being there. You can have a taste of that and something new.\u201d

So whether going to enjoy a seasonal snack or a brisk beverage, guests should make sure to do so before catching Phantom of the Opera at The Fabulous Fox Theatre.

Starting this month, J. Devoti Trattoria also will feature family-style dinners the first Sunday of each month until Thanksgiving. The four-course meal features pasta, an entr\u00e9e, a veggie and a salad for groups from 4 to 8 p.m. During that time, guests can pick a retail bottle of wine from the on-premises shop with no corkage fee.\u00a0

J. Devoti Trattoria, 5100 Daggett Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-5553, jdevoti.com

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\"IMG_9987\"
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St. Louisans can now swing open their shutters, sit out on patios and watch the world bloom. Spring may have taken its sweet time this year, but it\u2019s finally sprung \u2013 and Katie\u2019s Pizza & Pasta Osteria is making the most out of every minute.

\u201cThe bounty of spring and summer is exciting for a chef-driven menu,\u201d owner Katie Collier gushes. \u201cWe\u2019ll have something [new] every few weeks. Right now, we\u2019ve got morel mushrooms and green almonds. Next week, we\u2019ll do asparagus. We get so much energy from [the season]. Spring is where you can get really creative \u2013 and it is fun.\u201d

The Italian eatery is known for its farm-to-table style serving, with pasta noodles made from scratch, and fresh vegetables and herbs often grown on-site in the patio area.

\u201cThe new seasonal menu started [this month],\u201d Collier tells. \u201cWe brought back favorites, like our famous watermelon salad and our ricotta-stuffed fried squash blossoms \u2013 and even something from the original Katie\u2019s Pizza on Clayton Road: prosciutto wrapped spring rolls. It\u2019s filled with amazing vegetables, like pea shoots, Ozark mushrooms, fresh mozzarella and basil, and topped with balsamic. It\u2019s just so bright and refreshing.\u201d

The newest items making an appearance include a crab and corn risotto, topped with Osetra caviar, and an artichoke carbonara, garnished with pea shoots. Even the cocktail menu received an update, with fresh-pressed juices and lots of herbs. Sip on a pineapple Mai Tai, with tarragon, or fresh-pressed watermelon juice. The lavender lemonade also promises heavenly refreshment.

\u201cI\u2019m obsessed with food and ingredients, and menu development,\u201d Collier confesses. \u201cI get inspiration from my guests, as well as places all over the country and the world. I love putting incredible ingredients together and creating a magical dish. And I love seeing how creative chefs [build] their menus, design their restaurants and serve their guests.\u201d

Collier takes all that inspiration and infuses it into her own restaurants. \u201cMost of my kitchen staff has been with us since we opened,\u201d she shares. My chef de cuisine, Jake, has been with me for almost five years. We all care about hospitality. Everyone understands the food and is approachable. We share our personalities and create memories.\u201d

That warmth extends to the patios at both locations, which currently boast tropical plants and flowers, alongside the herb and vegetable gardens. With live music every night, the temptation to linger outside this spring proves irresistible.

\u201cWe go all out for patio season,\u201d Collier says. \u201cWe want you to feel transported to a magical place by creating a great experience for you to enjoy inspired food.\u201d Bon app\u00e9tit.

Katie’s Pizza & Pasta Osteria; 9568 Manchester Road, Rock Hill, 314-942-6555; 14171 Clayton Road, Town and Country, 636-220-3238; katiespizzaandpasta.com

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Story: Monsieur Firmin and Monsieur Andre, new owners of the Paris Opera House in 19th century France, are in a tight spot when their star performer, Carlotta Guidicelli, refuses to perform after a backstage mishap at the allegedly haunted theater. At the suggestion of ballet mistress Madame Giry, they audition and quickly hire ing\u00e9nue Christine Daae to substitute at that night\u2019s performance.

Christine is a hit with the audience. After the show, she is met by Raoul, Vicomte de Chagny, who reveals to her that they once were playmates when the orphaned Christine and he were children. She explains to Raoul that an unseen \u201cAngel of Music\u201d has tutored her, unaware that her champion is a disfigured musician who lives beneath the Paris Opera House and who is the subject of an urban myth about a \u201cPhantom of the Opera.\u201d

The Phantom subsequently reveals himself to Christine and takes her to his lair, where he has written an opera for her which he demands be performed by the Paris Opera Company, lest he wreak further havoc on the building and its staff. As Firmin and Andre agree to produce the piece, Raoul hatches a plot to capture the Phantom and free Christine from his influence forever.

Highlights: Re-imagined staging and a spectacular new set design propel this latest stop of the long-running North American touring production of this phenomenally successful musical, which has been performed continuously since 1986.

Other Info: Based on the novel by Gaston Leroux, the musical version of The Phantom of the Opera features music by composer Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Charles Hart, with a book by co-lyricist Richard Stilgoe and Webber. It premiered in London\u2019s West End in 1986 and on Broadway in 1988, celebrating its 30th anniversary on the Great White Way in January 2018.

Produced by Cameron Mackintosh, the Broadway production has had nearly 12,500 performances, making it far and away the most successful show in Broadway history. A national touring production closed in 2010 after nearly 20 years on the road. In 2013 a North American touring version was undertaken with new staging and an arresting new scenic design by Paul Brown that is a highlight all its own.

That rendition played The Fox in 2015 and has now returned for a brief engagement. The entrance to The Phantom\u2019s lair ingeniously incorporates a stairwell of receding planks inside a cylindrical apparatus which also opens into the Paris Opera House, as well as the office of the company\u2019s managers, as it rotates around the stage.

The famous chandelier still hovers precipitously above the auditorium in The Fox, and the background sets truly are stunning in their variety and construction, especially scenes for the \u2018operas\u2019 within the show, which are lavishly detailed in their own right.

While that is undeniably clever, some of the design doesn't measure up to the original concept, particularly The Phantom's mysterious residence and the access to it via an underground river, which seems muted in this edition.

Disappointing, too, is the absence of a grand staircase at the beginning of Act II, where the Phantom previously made a menacing appearance as he descended into a masked ball. In this version, he just walks into the throng, looking anything but daunting and terrifying.

The sumptuous sets are augmented by Nina Dunn\u2019s video and projection design which is highlighted by Christine\u2019s visit to her father\u2019s grave at a Paris cemetery, hauntingly illuminated by Paule Constable\u2019s lighting.

Add an eye-popping array of costumes created by designer Maria Bjornson and Mick Potter\u2019s sound design and you have the elaborate, extraordinary technical trappings for a first-rate theatrical event. It\u2019s all supplemented by Scott Ambler\u2019s sweeping choreography, which is on impressive display across the mammoth Fox stage.

Regardless of any shortcomings, The Phantom of the Opera continues to resonate primarily because of Lloyd Webber\u2019s powerfully persuasive music. His score is given a first-rate rendition by musical supervisor John Rigby, while Jamie Johns directs an orchestra expert at extracting lovely, lush melodies orchestrated by David Cullen and Lloyd Webber. Laurence Connor\u2019s direction is fine, entertaining audiences familiar with the Phantom musical or seeing it for the first time.

Eva Tavares delivers the stand-out performance in this latest production at The Fox, showcasing her beautiful soprano voice in duet with Quentin Oliver Lee in the title role on I Remember and the title number and also with Jordan Craig as Raoul on the haunting ballad All I Ask of You.

Lee does well as the tortured Phantom, but seems less inspired than performances by others in previous productions which have played The Fox. He\u2019s certainly imposing enough with his towering stature, and he delivers the show\u2019s signature tune, The Music of the Night, with affecting intensity.

Similarly, Craig is OK as Raoul but doesn\u2019t especially resonate in his scenes with Tavares. His dashing looks make for a convincing Raoul, but he sometimes comes across as more domineering with Christina rather than affectionate, especially in the first act.

The best supporting work is delivered by Kristie Dale Sanders, who portrays ballet mistress Madame Giry, the only management type who seems to take the disfigured Phantom and his grisly threats seriously. There\u2019s also a nice turn by Trista Moldovan as the imperious diva Carlotta.

David Benoit and Edward Staudenmayer portray the clueless managers, Firmin and Andre, respectively, while Phumzile Sojola is amusing as the opera\u2019s thick-headed tenor, Ubaldo Piangi.

This is far from the best version of The Phantom of the Opera to play The Fox in its numerous visits. Thanks to the stirring and haunting chords of its score, though, The Phantom yet intrigues.

Musical: The Phantom of the Opera

Company: Touring Company

Venue: Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Blvd.

Dates: Through May 20

Tickets: $59-$200; contact 534-1111 or metrotix.com

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Matthew Murphy

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Story: The French Quarter in New Orleans is a lively, lusty place, inhabited by musicians, artists and other bohemians as well as working-class denizens such as Stanley Kowalski and his wife Stella. The Kowalskis live on the first floor of a tenement building where the neighbors laugh, fight and love through the hot summer days and warm, breezy nights.

A stranger arrives one day at the Kowalski residence, just off the local streetcar named Desire. A friendly woman named Eunice informs the visitor, Blanche DuBois, that Blanche has indeed found the home of her sister Stella. Although Stella knows that Blanche will be visiting from their native Mississippi, she\u2019s surprised when Blanche arrives with all of her remaining possessions.

It\u2019s a tight squeeze, since the Kowalskis\u2019 home consists of a kitchen, a bedroom and a bathroom in shotgun style. It\u2019s decided that a curtain will be hung between the kitchen and bedroom to allow for some privacy for Blanche when she sleeps on a cot in a corner off the kitchen.

Blanche tells Stella that she\u2019s taken a leave of absence from her job as a high school English teacher in their home town of Laurel. She also informs her sister that nothing is left of their parents\u2019 estate. When Stanley arrives home and learns that his sister-in-law is staying indefinitely and that his wife\u2019s inheritance is gone, he becomes suspicious of Blanche, wondering where all the money has vanished.

He tells Blanche that Louisiana abides by the Napoleonic code, by which a husband is entitled to half of his wife\u2019s possessions and vice versa. He hears nothing from Blanche but vague and unsatisfying answers, though, which further irritate him.

While Blanche spends her days taking hot baths or shopping with Stella, she continues to evade questions about her fortunes. Her attractive appearance catches the eye of Mitch, Stanley\u2019s Army buddy and a regular in the poker games at Stanley\u2019s place.

The quiet, shy Mitch strikes up a conversation with the 30ish Blanche and begins a tentative relationship with her. The lonely bachelor tells her about his devotion to his ailing mother and her hope that he finds someone for companionship before she passes away. Blanche has flamboyant stories for Mitch about her past and he believes what she says.

As Stanley investigates Blanche\u2019s background he is validated in his suspicions, ultimately confronting her with her lies. Blanche\u2019s fragile hold on reality slips further away under her brother-in-law\u2019s nasty assault. Can her romance with Mitch withstand the intense scrutiny of the truth?

Highlights: The centerpiece of this year\u2019s Tennessee Williams Festival, A Streetcar Named Desire is given a bold, beautiful and brazen interpretation under Tim Ocel\u2019s nuanced direction. Standout performances by Sophia Brown, Nick Narcisi, Lana Dvorak and Spencer Sickmann mine the poetry and passion of what Ocel calls Williams\u2019 \u201cgreatest play.\u201d

Other Info: The locale for A Streetcar Named Desire blends with the sub-title of this year\u2019s festival, The French Quarter Years. The impressive set designed by James Wolk welcomes an audience into a theater rich with atmosphere, from the drying laundry hanging outside on clothes lines and a row of window shutters across the background to the plain but functional kitchen and bedroom which constitute the Kowalski home, moving from stage right to stage left.

Props manager Christy Sust well appoints the set with a tiny white refrigerator, table and chairs in the kitchen and a small vanity as well as a bed in the bedroom. There\u2019s also a naked light bulb hanging from the ceiling to which Blanche has a Chinese lantern affixed, setting up the drama\u2019s stark conclusion.

Sean Savoie alternates his lighting between the harshness of the day and the shadows of night, underscored by Amanda Werre\u2019s sound design of passing trains, while Michele Siler dresses the characters in the simple, comfortable attire of the residents as well as Blanche\u2019s fading threads.

Ocel directs this two-act presentation like an artist caressing his canvas, with gentle but clearly defined brush strokes for Blanche, Stanley, Stella and Mitch. Brown shows several facets of Blanche\u2019s determined personality, making her more defiant than vulnerable as her fragile psyche slips further down the rabbit hole. She\u2019s an outside force of unknown strength who looms over the French Quarter like an impending hurricane.

Narcisi works beautifully both with Brown and with Dvorak as Stella. Ocel pulls no punches depicting Stanley\u2019s abusive instincts, which Narcisi delivers in cruel, venal fashion. Yet, the actor can also convey Stanley\u2019s childlike dependence upon Stella, wailing inconsolably when she leaves after his latest beating of her, then rejoicing giddily when she returns to his lair in the dead of night.

Dvorak handles the pivotal role of Stella with aplomb, guarding her wayward sister on the one hand while supporting her husband, faults and all, with tenderness and compassion. It\u2019s a difficult part but she is up to the task to the betterment of the entire production.

Sickmann is most impressive as he shows a multi-faceted approach to Mitch. He\u2019s more a concerned son than a mama\u2019s boy, as well as a gentleman who restrains his impulses for the \u2018elegant\u2019 Blanche, only to feel bitterly betrayed in the end. It\u2019s an affecting and heroic effort.

There\u2019s superb supporting work from a well-choreographed cast which includes Amy Loui as Eunice, Isaiah DiLorenzo as her hard-drinking husband Steve and Jesse Munoz as poker pal Pablo. Jacob Flekier does well as a young newspaper collector who becomes the object of Blanche\u2019s embarrassing flirtation, while Isabel Pastrana portrays a flower seller strolling through the neighborhood.

David Wassilak and Maggie Wininger play a doctor and his associate who take a really long, slow, deliberate and melodramatic trek to the Kowalskis\u2019 door to escort Blanche to a mental hospital.

A Streetcar Named Desire is rightly considered one of the greatest American plays of the 20th century. Under Ocel\u2019s careful and considered guidance, it\u2019s given a suitably stunning rendering at this year\u2019s Williams Festival.

Play: A Streetcar Named Desire

Company: Tennessee Williams Festival

Venue: Grandel Theatre, 3610 Grandel Square

Dates: May 16, 17, 19

Tickets: $35-$45; contact twstl.org, metrotix.com or 534-1111

Rating: A 5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Ride Hamilton

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Story: The New York City underworld is a lively place in the mid-20th century. Nathan Detroit runs the town\u2019s \u201coldest established floating crap game,\u201d which takes place wherever and whenever he can find a locale willing to host his motley crew of gamblers.

As usual, Nathan is short on cash, so in order to play at the Biltmore garage he has to come up with $1,000 up front to use those premises. He decides to wager fellow gambler Sky Masterson a grand that Sky can\u2019t convince local Salvation Army trooper Sarah Brown to accompany Sky for dinner in Havana.

Sky accepts the bet, then finds himself attracted to Sarah. Meanwhile, Nathan continues to delay marriage to Adelaide, a nightclub entertainer who has been engaged to Detroit for 14 years. After taking Sarah to Havana and getting her drunk on rum, though, Masterson decides to tell Detroit that he wasn\u2019t able to get a date with Sarah and thus loses his bet to Detroit in order to protect Sarah\u2019s reputation.

When Salvation Army General Cartwright comes to New York to inform Sarah and her grandfather that their post is to be shut down due to lack of success, Masterson guarantees that he can bring a dozen sinners to the mission. He wins bets against his fellow gamblers, who reluctantly join him at the outpost. Sky marries Sarah, Nathan finally weds Adelaide and the gamblers enter \u201chonorable\u201d professions to earn their livelihoods.

Highlights: Adam Grun deftly directs a large but energetic cast at Kirkwood Theatre Guild in a lively and generally entertaining version of this show which won the 1950 Tony Award for Best Musical. Based on stories by Damon Runyon, it features music and lyrics by Frank Loesser with a book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows.

Other Info: After a sluggish start and some shaggy playing by the KTG orchestra, the production picked up on opening night with an entertaining second act. It also benefited from several fine performances, notably by Rebecca Porwell as the humorous and long-suffering Miss Adelaide and Jacqueline Roush as the determined Sarah Brown.

Both women demonstrate fine voices, as Roush works smoothly with Kelvin Urday as Sky Masterson on the ballad duets, I\u2019ll Know and I\u2019ve Never Been in Love Before. Porwell displays a sure comic touch and is backed by a spirited troupe called The Hot Box Dancers on her amusing numbers, which include Bushel and a Peck and Take Back Your Mink, as well as the charming number Sue Me, which she sings in tandem with Jeffrey Wright as the smooth-dealing Nathan Detroit.

Urday brings charm and sincerity to the role of the notorious Masterson, who undergoes a transformation for the sake of love during the two-act musical comedy, while Wright makes the most of the humor in Detroit\u2019s part, including a running gag about his growing \u201cfamily\u201d and \u201ccareer\u201d invented by Adelaide in letters to her mother in Rhode Island.

The supporting cast includes a fine turn by Chris Strawhun as second-rate hood Nicely- Nicely Johnson, delivering the goods on the spirited number, Sit Down, You\u2019re Rockin\u2019 the Boat in the mission. Kent Lopinot is amusing as another seedy sort, Harry the Horse, while Ed Burguiere humorously handles the lines of Chicago gangster and sore loser Big Jule.

Robert Doyle and Dan Horst play other gangsters, while Tom Day portrays dim-witted detective, Lt. Brannigan. Jim Wamser has the role of Sarah\u2019s grandfather Arvide, who is assisted by crowd-pleaser Laura Deveney as industrious Salvation Army veteran Agatha. Tara Hoisington has fun as General Cartwright, who is impressed by the return of the \u201csinner\u201d gamblers to the House of the Lord.

Courtney Gibson\u2019s fun choreography is well performed by Angela Brandow, Andrea Brown, Julia Gilbert, Elizabeth Kelley, Stephanie Merritt, Kendra Moore, Devon Elizabeth Shipley and Natalie Torrance. Sam Bippen, Matthew Kauzlarich and Caden Turner fill the ranks of the gamblers.

Musical director Sean Bippen and his orchestra are seated on stage at rear center, which enhances the scenes in the Hot Box nightclub and the Havana restaurant. Stepanie Merritt and Kent Coffel designed the set, which is festively decorated by Cherol Thibaut and lit by John \u2018JT\u2019 Taylor. Thibaut adds the well-appointed costumes, including some flashy suits adorning gamblers.

It\u2019s always worth seeing and hearing Guys & Dolls just for the signature tune, Luck Be a Lady, which here is rendered smoothly and engagingly by Urday. Roll the dice and you\u2019re likely to win with this production.

Musical: Guys & Dolls

Company: Kirkwood Theatre Guild

Venue: Reim Theatre, Kirkwood Civic Center, 111 South Geyer Road

Dates: May 10, 11, 12, 13

Tickets: $20; contact 821-9956 or ktg-onstage.org

Rating: A 3.5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

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\"AS18-

Amy Sherald\u00a0

Consider, if you will, the homophones coo (the pleased-sounding cry of a dove) and coup (a brilliant achievement) \u2013 as in the observation that the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis collectively may be cooing over a current coup.

That coup, the free exhibition titled \u201cAmy Sherald,\u201d runs through Aug. 19 in CAM\u2019s Front Room gallery. It constitutes the first major solo museum showcase of the painter who recently skyrocketed to fame with Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama, her official oil-on-linen depiction of this nation\u2019s former first lady for the Smithsonian Institution\u2019s National Portrait Gallery.

Admittedly, the local exhibition (opening on the date this issue hits the stands) almost necessarily excludes that artistic marvel, following its Feb. 12 unveiling with Kehinde Wiley\u2019s painting of former President Barack Obama.

On general principles, though, a comment from Dorothy Moss \u2013 curator of painting and sculpture at the National Portrait Gallery, whose \u201c20th Century Americans\u201d exhibition Sherald\u2019s striking painting of the ex-first lady now graces \u2013 suggests the level of interest potentially facing CAM, for reasons involving both empowerment and Sherald\u2019s technique (grisaille, a monochromatic painting effect designed to suggest three-dimensionality).

\"Sherald_A

Amy Sherald, A clear unspoken granted magic, 2017. Oil on canvas, 54 \u00d7 43 inches. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

\u201cMuseum attendance has increased dramatically since the Obama portraits were unveiled,\u201d Moss relates. \u201cI have especially noticed the excitement on the faces of young girls who come to see Michelle Obama\u2019s portrait.

\u201cIt\u2019s a joy to watch how this portrait inspires and how community forms around the portrait. It\u2019s also wonderful to listen to visitors engage in meaningful dialogue about portraiture while standing in front of Amy Sherald\u2019s portrait of Michelle Obama.\u201d

Lisa Melandri, CAM\u2019s executive director, organized \u201cAmy Sherald\u201d for the St. Louis institution. \u201cCAM is a museum that loves its firsts, so the idea of extending an invitation to an extraordinarily talented artist to have her first solo museum show with us was a perfect fit,\u201d Melandri relates by way of providing background on the exhibition\u2019s origin. \u201cWe like to be thought of as a launchpad for unheralded artistic vision.

\u201cI first saw Amy Sherald\u2019s work in 2016, and her singular power was immediately evident. A little more than a year ago, I made an inquiry to Amy about an intimate exhibition at CAM, and I was absolutely delighted when she accepted. With her recent recognition, I feel it\u2019s terrific that more people can see and know her exceptional work.\u201d

\"Sherald_Varsity

Amy Sherald, Varsity Girl, 2016. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43 inches. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

With regard to staging the exhibition, Melandri unstintingly praises Monique Meloche Gallery, which has long fostered Sherald\u2019s artistry. \u201cIt\u2019s a great pleasure to work on any project with Monique,\u201d she says of the Chicago institution\u2019s namesake. \u201cHer gallery is known for maintaining attentive and supportive long-term relationships with their artists. I also think it\u2019s important to acknowledge that Monique knew this was good work before Amy received broader recognition. Monique has been incredibly helpful at every stage of this exhibition.\u201d

Although a request for a brief interview with Sherald went unanswered, Melandri, more or less in passing, explains why \u2013 the artist is both exacting and quite busy.

\u201cPart of the reason we thought of doing an intimate exhibition was from taking into account that Amy makes [only] 10 to 12 paintings a year, and she wanted to create new work especially for the show,\u201d she says.

\u201cWith new works as the exhibition centerpiece, we were also interested in including works with single figures, the more rare works with two figures, as well as a combination of portraits at the 4\u00bd- by 3\u00bd-foot size she usually employs along with larger-scale works. So even with a small presentation of paintings, you get a range of her stylistic choices and the range of her sitters, all completed in just the last three years.\u201d

\"Sherald_Whats

Amy Sherald, What\u2019s precious inside of him does not care to be known by the mind in ways that diminish its presence (All American), 2017. Oil on canvas, 54 x 43 inches. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

When asked to name her personal favorite among the pieces in \u201cAmy Sherald,\u201d Melandri waffles just a bit, perhaps understandably. \u201cThat\u2019s an incredibly difficult question to answer, because every work in the exhibition is moving and appealing, which is why they\u2019ve been selected,\u201d she says.

\u201cI think A clear unspoken granted magic shows Sherald\u2019s signature style \u2013 the exacting rendering of the young woman\u2019s face against the monochrome background combined with the bold geometric patterning in her clothing.\u201d

Melandri also sketches information about a CAM document to commemorate the exhibition: \u201cIt\u2019ll be a modest publication featuring an in-depth interview with Amy and documentation of the exhibition. We decided to include an interview so that Amy\u2019s vision and voice would be central.\u201d

To highlight CAM\u2019s achievement even further, it will take two years for Sherald to enjoy what\u2019s been characterized as \u201ca major retrospective\u201d in her own hometown, under Christopher Bedford, director at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Nonetheless, almost necessarily, he shares Melandri\u2019s general enthusiasm for Sherald\u2019s work and the specific enthusiasm of the portrait pilgrims mentioned by Moss.

\u201cI think portraiture by black American artists occupies an extraordinarily important position in contemporary culture,\u201d Bedford says. \u201cMuseums nationwide are searching for ways to represent communities of people traditionally unrepresented on museum walls.

\u201cAs if in response to this, artists like Amy Sherald have made great strides in reinventing portraiture for a new audience in 2018. The survey exhibition of her work being organized by the BMA examines almost 15 years of portrait painting. Debuting in Baltimore in 2020, before touring, the show could not feel more timely.\u201d

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-535-4660, camstl.org

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\"BoathouseHiRes-04.jpg\"
BoathouseHiRes-04.jpg

An iconic St. Louis dining destination recently reopened with a new operator, as the much-loved Boathouse at Forest Park officially debuted under the management of Sugarfire Events on April 25 with a full menu of appetizers, entr\u00e9es, sandwiches and more.

The venue received both a kitchen remodel and a contemporary revamp, with fresh paint and nautical photographs to accentuate the dining room\u2019s classic aspects, like skylights and a double-sided fireplace. The annex next to the restaurant will serve as a private event space.

Executive chef Jack W. MacMurray III oversees the restaurant\u2019s kitchen. His lengthy culinary r\u00e9sum\u00e9 includes cooking and consulting for various area businesses, most recently including Kirkwood Station Brewing Co., Schneidhorst\u2019s, Chandler Hill Vineyards and Candicci\u2019s Restaurant and Bar.

\u201cMike Johnson and I have been good friends for many years,\u201d MacMurray says of the mastermind behind Sugarfire Smoke House. \u201cWhen he got the place, he knew I\u2019d be a perfect fit. Boathouse has an American menu with regional and [global] influences. It\u2019s definitely the core of my cooking style.\u201d

Some of MacMurray\u2019s signatures include an almond-encrusted and flash-fried shrimp appetizer served with citrus Thai sweet chili sauce. His Mac Daddy BLT comes with avocado, vine-ripened tomato, butter lettuce, toasted sourdough and chipotle a\u00efoli. The Boathouse salad comes with harvest blended greens, radish, pear, goat cheese, candied pecans and a maple-raspberry herb vinaigrette \u2013 a dressing MacMurray created more than 20 years ago and has served at hundreds of weddings since.

Additional highlights include bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin with sweet potato-asparagus hash and spiced cherry glaze; smoked chicken and shrimp penne saut\u00e9 with andouille sausage, tomato, spinach and Cajun Alfredo; and platters for sharing, featuring local charcuterie, artisanal cheeses, house-cured salmon gravlax and more. So whether going all-in for an entr\u00e9e or simply enjoying a shareable plate, Boathouse guests can enjoy any number of great options before skipping across the way to one of The Muny\u2019s upcoming shows.

The establishment\u2019s revamp also incorporates two retooled patio bars with a beverage selection that includes six draft beers, 25 more canned options and a full spectrum of spirits. Batch cocktails \u2013 available in single-serving carafes as well as pitchers \u2013 will include options such as margaritas, a peach-mango ice pick and whiskey lemonade. The bar menu will also include a selection of grab-and-go picnic-friendly items such as sandwiches, salads and cold appetizers.

\u201cWe looked at what we had here, and tried to elevate the experience by completely utilizing everything this property has and how it should be used to really pay honor to the beauty of one of the most iconic landmarks in St. Louis,\u201d says bar manager Dan Jameson, who also oversees the venue\u2019s live entertainment.

\u201cWe\u2019re excited to give people a fulfilling experience with the Boathouse at Forest Park,\u201d MacMurray concludes. \u201cGreat food, great music, great service, a beautiful atmosphere, an iconic bar and an iconic location.\u201d

Boathouse at Forest Park, 6101 Government Drive, St. Louis, 314-366-1555, boathousestl.com

"}, {"id":"b2dc906f-1308-5154-88d0-d9197af696b4","type":"article","starttime":"1525971600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-05-10T12:00:00-05:00","priority":40,"sections":[{"columns":"arts-and-culture/columns"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Ready Readers: Shaping Up Storytime","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/article_b2dc906f-1308-5154-88d0-d9197af696b4.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/ready-readers-shaping-up-storytime/article_b2dc906f-1308-5154-88d0-d9197af696b4.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/ready-readers-shaping-up-storytime/article_b2dc906f-1308-5154-88d0-d9197af696b4.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Sheila Oliveri","prologue":"Young children customarily delight in detecting shapes in their surroundings.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"ea75139a-0572-5bf6-8ce7-37333879dc0e","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"260","height":"260","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea75139a-0572-5bf6-8ce7-37333879dc0e/5aeb714da10a6.image.jpg?resize=260%2C260"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea75139a-0572-5bf6-8ce7-37333879dc0e/5aeb714da10a6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea75139a-0572-5bf6-8ce7-37333879dc0e/5aeb714da10a6.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/a7/ea75139a-0572-5bf6-8ce7-37333879dc0e/5aeb714da10a6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"f23ce1ba-7892-53a9-a102-4f7ec4a5b513","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"277","height":"498","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/23/f23ce1ba-7892-53a9-a102-4f7ec4a5b513/5aeb714daf790.image.jpg?resize=277%2C498"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"180","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/23/f23ce1ba-7892-53a9-a102-4f7ec4a5b513/5aeb714daf790.image.jpg?resize=100%2C180"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"539","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/23/f23ce1ba-7892-53a9-a102-4f7ec4a5b513/5aeb714daf790.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1841","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/23/f23ce1ba-7892-53a9-a102-4f7ec4a5b513/5aeb714daf790.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"a60bfdde-3a06-5ae4-81c9-6f6d293a1454","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/png","width":"235","height":"177","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/60/a60bfdde-3a06-5ae4-81c9-6f6d293a1454/5aeb714dbc839.image.png?resize=235%2C177"},"100": {"type":"image/png","width":"100","height":"75","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/60/a60bfdde-3a06-5ae4-81c9-6f6d293a1454/5aeb714dbc839.image.png?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/png","width":"300","height":"226","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/60/a60bfdde-3a06-5ae4-81c9-6f6d293a1454/5aeb714dbc839.image.png"},"1024":{"type":"image/png","width":"1024","height":"771","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/60/a60bfdde-3a06-5ae4-81c9-6f6d293a1454/5aeb714dbc839.image.png"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"b2dc906f-1308-5154-88d0-d9197af696b4","body":"
\"Tickle
Tickle Monster.jpg

Young children customarily delight in detecting shapes in their surroundings. From noting a triangular yield sign while riding in the car, through spotting rectangular window panes, to gleefully scooping circular Cheerios from their cereal bowls, kids revel in the shapes all around them.

In that regard, parents, consider sharing with your young Euclids these three geometrically inspired and inspiring recommendations from a trio of writer/illustrators:

The first, Tickle Monster by \u00c9douard Manceau, features an appealingly bright and stark protagonist composed of colorfully fanciful forms. Readers should enjoy watching the eponymous ogre morph from scary to silly to subdued; as its body parts are disarticulated, they become part of a tranquil nighttime neighborhood landscape.

The accompanying text should embolden youngsters to tickle various parts of the mild menace\u2019s body to debilitate it. Toddlers, in particular, should enjoy the opportunity to tickle and tame the beast, while preschoolers may take interest in tracking the changes that take place while converting creature to street scene.

\"Walters
Walters Wonderful Wedding.png

Walter\u2019s Wonderful Web by Tim Hopgood, this month\u2019s second recommendation, spotlights perseverance, creativity and an appreciation of hard work. In it, readers meet Walter, an eager young spider, who tries unsuccessfully to weave the perfect web, like those made by his friends. Throughout a very long day, Walter spins multiple \u201cwibbly-wobbly\u201d differently shaped webs, only to have the wind waft each away. In the end, though, through many trials and struggles, Walter feels great satisfaction as his mesh masterpiece shines in the moonlight.

Beyond naming the various shapes attempted by Walter, ensuing activities with children may include discovering small shapes in common household objects, counting the number of sides outlining each one or playfully tallying the number of triangles, circles or squares in the backyard garden.

\"Perfect
Perfect Square.jpg

This month\u2019s third recommendation involves a book that children and adults alike may enjoy. Michael Hall\u2019s Perfect Square simply yet inventively celebrates color, form, manipulation and transformation. It also conveys basic early childhood concepts of time, texture and language through bold-hued torn-paper geometrics. Carefully placed lines and arcs bring the amorphous images into context.

In Perfect Square, Hall designs an artistic adventure that may well inspire your family to create an original picture story all its own. All you\u2019ll need is paper, a pencil \u2013 and imagination!\u00a0

At Ready Readers, we know that \u201cKids Who Read Succeed!\u201d Visit our website (readyreaders.org) to learn how you can support our efforts to ensure a brighter future for our community\u2019s most vulnerable children by providing new books, early literacy experiences and more.

"}, {"id":"99dfe91e-f7f5-53ab-9ec4-3f8112c2aae7","type":"article","starttime":"1525971600","starttime_iso8601":"2018-05-10T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1525973405","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Happy 100th, Muny!","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_99dfe91e-f7f5-53ab-9ec4-3f8112c2aae7.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-happy-th-muny/article_99dfe91e-f7f5-53ab-9ec4-3f8112c2aae7.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/dinner-a-show-happy-th-muny/article_99dfe91e-f7f5-53ab-9ec4-3f8112c2aae7.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"A considerable stretch separates\u00a0Aida\u00a0and\u00a0Jersey Boys, but the distance between them underscores how central The Muny remains to the area arts scene.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["dinner & a show","the muny","annie","gypsy","jerome robbins' broadway","jersey boys","meet me in st. louis","singin' in the rain","the wiz"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":1200,"hiresheight":675,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0d/50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced/5af1d105137d9.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"980","height":"654","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0d/50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced/5af1d10512633.image.jpg?crop=980%2C654%2C98%2C14&resize=980%2C654&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0d/50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced/5af1d10512633.image.jpg?crop=980%2C654%2C98%2C14&resize=100%2C67&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0d/50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced/5af1d10512633.image.jpg?crop=980%2C654%2C98%2C14&resize=300%2C200&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0d/50d502d4-3a20-5a7f-bd05-71e95f162ced/5af1d10512633.image.jpg?crop=980%2C654%2C98%2C14"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"99dfe91e-f7f5-53ab-9ec4-3f8112c2aae7","body":"
\"munygala1.jpg\"
munygala1.jpg

A considerable stretch separates Aida and Jersey Boys, but the distance between them underscores how central The Muny remains to the area arts scene.

In 1917, The Municipal Opera of St. Louis, as The Muny originally was known, presented a weeklong run of Verdi\u2019s classic opera Aida. Two years later, on June 6, 1919, a performance of Robin Hood began The Muny\u2019s annual season at its showcase amphitheater in the heart of Forest Park. Since then, six generations of families have made The Muny a summer entertainment destination.

This season\u2019s series features two regional premieres (Jersey Boys and Jerome Robbins\u2019 Broadway), with two family classics (Annie and The Wiz), two American musical staples (Gypsy and Singin\u2019 in the Rain) and an iconic local story (Meet Me in St. Louis) also coming.

To start the milestone season memorably, The Muny will stage two special events this month. Muny favorites Heather Headley and Matthew Morrison co-host An Evening With the Stars there at 9:15 p.m. on Friday, May 18. Two days later, The Muny holds its \u201cCentennial Birthday Bash\u201d from 1 to 5 p.m.

Tickets for the first event start at $15, obtainable by visiting muny.org/100, with 1,500 free seats offered on a first-come, first-served basis. (Although the gala’s dinner portion sold out, many tickets remain for the show itself.) The centennial bash, meanwhile, is free, with some activities, Muny souvenirs and food available for purchase.

\u201cThis will be a night of real Muny history,\u201d says Muny artistic director and executive producer Mike Isaacson of the gala. \u201cSo many extraordinary talents will be joining us, and we\u2019re working to create a show that we hope for the rest of your life, you\u2019ll be able to say, \u2018I was there.\u2019\u201d

The season then starts with Jerome Robbins\u2019 Broadway (June 11 to 17), starring Muny favorite Rob McClure (The Addams Family, Hello, Dolly!, Beauty and the Beast) and directed by Broadway veteran Cynthia Onrubia. Following it is The Wiz (June 19 to 25), directed by St. Louis Theater Circle winner Denis Jones (42nd Street, A Chorus Line, Chicago) and starring Nathan Lee Graham (Fox TV\u2019s LA to Vegas), Jared Grimes, Mykal Kilgore and James T. Lane.

Singin\u2019 in the Rain, last seen at The Muny in 2011, runs from June 27 to July 3, with Marc Bruni directing. It showcases Broadway star Corbin Bleu, one-time Muny Kid Berklea Going and Jeffrey Schechter, who came to the rescue at the 11th hour for last season\u2019s A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, enchanting Muny audiences with his performance as Pseudolus.

Following that will be The Muny and world regional debut of Jersey Boys (July 9 to 16), directed and choreographed by Josh Rhodes.

Annie takes to The Muny stage for the first time since 2009 from July 18 to 25; directing it is John Tartaglia, seen at The Muny last season in A Funny Thing and a 13-year veteran performer on PBS\u2019s Sesame Street. Christopher Sieber portrays Daddy Warbucks, with Jennifer Simard playing that dastardly orphanage villain Miss Hannigan.

Rob Ruggiero, who\u2019s directed The Music Man, Oklahoma!, South Pacific and The King and I at The Muny, returns to direct the classic musical Gypsy from July 27 to Aug. 2. Ralph Perkins choreographs the show, which features lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, music by Jule Styne and a book by Arthur Laurents.

Closing the centennial season Aug. 4 to 12 is that perennial Muny favorite Meet Me in St. Louis, making its eighth appearance on the Forest Park stage and first since 2009. Marcia Milgrom Dodge directs, with choreography by Josh Walden (The Little Mermaid, Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story). Erin Dilly and her real-life husband, Stephen R. Buntrock, portray Mrs. Anna and Mr. Alonso Smith. This presentation includes several songs new to the stage adaptation of the show.

The Muny\u2019s centennial season, in short, features something familiar, something new and something pretty much for everyone to enjoy. One can understand why, in producing top-tier, Broadway-caliber shows on the sprawling stage of that impressive outdoor theater, before thousands of patrons on summer evenings in St. Louis, The Muny can proclaim that it\u2019s \u201calone \u2026 in its greatness.\u201d\u00a0

Municipal Theatre Association of St. Louis, 1 Theatre Drive, St. Louis, 314-361-1900, muny.org

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\"Wilted
Wilted Salad Greens with Cherry Glaze 5.jpg

All winter, I dreamed of fresh cherries, and now, at last, cherry season \u2013 May and June in Missouri \u2013 has arrived!

My favorite ways to work with the fruit involve grilling, roasting or simply saut\u00e9ing it on the stove. The tartness and sweetness inherent in cherries provide an ideal foil for savory flavors, so use the fruit fresh to make a glaze for chicken or the base of a salad dressing.

This saut\u00e9ed cherry and wilted vegetable salad incorporates cherries in two ways: saut\u00e9ed whole, to add pops of color and flavor to the salad and then, through their juice, to coat and soften hearty cruciferous vegetables.

This salad constitutes more than a side dish, though; very slightly cooking the shredded vegetables in a blend of fresh cherries, cherry juice and white balsamic vinegar results in a salad full of crunch and natural sweetness.\u00a0

SAUT\u00c9ED CHERRY AND WILTED VEGETABLE SALAD

To shred these hearty vegetables and greens easily and fast, use a mandolin. Also, feel free to use a different combination of veggies here \u2013 either different proportions of the ones listed or a new blend altogether. Other hearty vegetables and greens like cauliflower, arugula, bok choy, kohlrabi and radishes would work well.

Serves 4

Preparation | In a large saucepan over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons of white balsamic vinegar and cherries. Saut\u00e9 until cherries start to soften and cherry juice begins to thicken, 7 minutes.

Add Brussels sprouts, broccoli, red and green cabbages, and kale, and saut\u00e9 for an additional 2 minutes or until vegetables become wilted and slightly soft.

Divide mixture evenly between 4 salad plates. Drizzle with remaining white balsamic vinegar, and top with crumbled goat cheese. Serve.

Kristen Doyle is the creator of award-winning website dineanddish.net. Since early 2006, she has been sharing her favorite recipes, photos and life stories with an ever-growing audience of engaged readers. Beyond her blog, Doyle has expanded her freelance food and travel writing and photography career to include work with major brands, as well as providing editorial content and direction for nationwide print publications and websites. Follow Doyle on social media @dineanddish.

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\"happy_planet01.JPG\"
happy_planet01.JPG

Although the characterization likely would prompt a laugh from him, Carmon Colangelo might well rank as the metro area\u2019s preeminent equilibrist, given that he daily walks a tightrope between a high-profile career in administration and a calling in art.

\"carmon-colangelo_325o.jpg\"
carmon-colangelo_325o.jpg

\u201cHappy Planet,\u201d an exhibition running with three others through June 1 at Clayton\u2019s Bruno David Gallery, illustrates that calling, and Colangelo reflects on it from his administrative milieu at Washington University in St. Louis, where since 2006 he has served as the first dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts.

\u201cBeing an artist is central to my identity and who I\u2019ve always been, so making art has always been there,\u201d he says. \u201cIt\u2019s something I have to make time to continue. Generally, I\u2019ve always thought about it a bit like exercise. You need to do something all the time \u2013 you can\u2019t just do it part of the time. \u2026 Typically, I spend weekends in the studio if I\u2019m not traveling.\u201d

The dean adds that in academe, creating art equates to research; to that extent, his calling and his career dovetail equitably.

\"carmon-colangelo_327o.jpg\"
carmon-colangelo_327o.jpg

\u201cHappy Planet\u201d \u2013 Colangelo\u2019s 10th solo exhibition with the Bruno David Gallery, which is publishing an exhibition catalog of his work that includes a history and bibliography \u2013 comprises two discrete series of prints: Happy Plans (in which straight lines predominate) and Colorful World (in which curvier figures prevail).

Both Happy Plans and Colorful World involve monotypes, generally defined as unique prints from a plate (whether of metal, glass or some other substance) whereon a picture has been made with ink, paint or something else.

\"carmon-colangelo_329o.jpg\"
carmon-colangelo_329o.jpg

\u201cThe happy planet is also in the happy plan \u2013 I like to always plan happy days,\u201d the dean says generically about the series, before laughing (something he does quite a bit). \u201cHow do you structure a day without happiness? The Happy Plans look more like architecture sections, and they\u2019re made to be flat \u2026 where the Colorful World ideas are more organic forms and more layered and heavily embossed.\u201d

A press release from the gallery characterized the prints in \u201cHappy Planet\u201d as \u201ca playful and somewhat saccharin response to the current state of political affairs,\u201d which Colangelo explains.

\u201cGetting central to knowledge is seeking truth,\u201d he says. \u201cI think this period where truth is being challenged as \u2018fake news\u2019 or \u2018alternative reality\u2019 and not having its base in research and knowledge is a troubling matter \u2013 how it\u2019s being politicized and how it\u2019s being played out for political advantage is really a sad state of affairs.

\u201cThe \u2018saccharin response\u2019 is to say I wish for a happier planet, one that would be more civil in discourse and one that seeks the truth.\u201d

Mentioning \u201clots of drawings, lots of studies, lots of ideas\u201d preparatory to any of his creative endeavors, Colangelo provides background on the heuristics underlying \u201cHappy Planet\u201d and the actual creation of the exhibition\u2019s two series.

\u201cI made them all in one big burst,\u201d he says of the works, all dated 2018. \u201cThe deceptive thing about that is that I\u2019m constantly working up to the works. So while I printed all the work in January, I\u2019ve been working on the ideas probably since late summer, from my last show on, thinking about how to construct them \u2013 so, the plates being prepared and cut, and the mapping of the ideas.

\u201cThen there\u2019s a lot of experimentation that goes on, that sort of trial and error. But once you get the \u2018language,\u2019 once you\u2019re set up to do it, once you curate it down, then you\u2019re sort of in the zone.\u201d

Colangelo also distinguishes between the series from a procedural vantage.

\"carmon-colangelo_341o.jpg\"
carmon-colangelo_341o.jpg

\u201cI think that the way that I\u2019ve been working, probably the ones that challenged me more were the Colorful World in terms of constructing them,\u201d he says. \u201cThey\u2019re layered in a different way, where they\u2019re all printed, but the monotype printing process that I used in the Colorful World prints requires me to make the watercolor monotype on a plexiglass plate that\u2019s then printed on paper, and then the second plates are printed on a relief press [a press using a plate or similar device to whose surface, but no recessed areas, ink is applied subsequent to being brought in contact with paper].

\u201cSo there\u2019s a lot more chance involved in the actual layering process of those works. The Colorful World prints are more complex, layered, and so therefore more multivalent in that way.\u201d

After \u201cHappy Planet,\u201d Colangelo expresses the hope of continuing his longstanding professional relationship with the Bruno David Gallery, whose namesake he praises as \u201cvery generous,\u201d as well as other workshops and shows in Florida and other places. In the final analysis, all such activity ultimately will hit the dean\u2019s academic curriculum vitae \u2013 which actually might need a few years\u2019 worth of updates and which already totals 14 pages.

Bruno David Gallery, 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton, 314-696-2377, brunodavidgallery.com

"}, {"id":"4ed29d78-b78b-55ec-a23e-52322229be76","type":"article","starttime":"1525366800","starttime_iso8601":"2018-05-03T12:00:00-05:00","priority":40,"sections":[{"dining":"arts-and-culture/dining"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Growler USA","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dining/article_4ed29d78-b78b-55ec-a23e-52322229be76.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dining/dinner-a-show-growler-usa/article_4ed29d78-b78b-55ec-a23e-52322229be76.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dining/dinner-a-show-growler-usa/article_4ed29d78-b78b-55ec-a23e-52322229be76.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mabel Suen","prologue":"An epic selection of American craft beer became available in St. Charles in March, when Growler USA opened with 100 taps and a full menu of pub-style victuals.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["nner & a show","growler usa"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390","description":"","byline":"Photo by Mabel Suen","hireswidth":1763,"hiresheight":1175,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/41/741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390/5ae7454a12ffa.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/41/741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390/5ae7454a11d84.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/41/741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390/5ae7454a11d84.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/41/741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390/5ae7454a11d84.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/41/741730d1-2cdc-5f8c-88ad-5a670924c390/5ae7454a11d84.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"4ed29d78-b78b-55ec-a23e-52322229be76","body":"
\"GrowlerUSAHiRes-01.jpg\"
GrowlerUSAHiRes-01.jpg

An epic selection of American craft beer became available in St. Charles in March, when Growler USA opened with 100 taps and a full menu of pub-style victuals.

Growler USA, which launched in 2014, now has more than 20 locations nationwide. Franchisees Nick and Jody Hester own the local location, the first in Missouri. Not coincidentally, Nick Hester, who also owns the financial advising firm Royalty Financial Group, is an avid home brewer.

\u201cI\u2019ve been home brewing for 18 years and love it,\u201d he says. \u201cHere, I want beer to taste exactly the way it\u2019s intended to, out of respect to the brewers\u2019 craft. Our slogan is \u2018true to the brew,\u2019 and our taproom is designed to pour that perfect beer.\u201d

Growler USA fills 2,300 square feet space and seats up to 74 guests. Its rustic design features a reclaimed wood bar top, bamboo tabletops and brick throughout the bar and dining area. A patio also will open in warmer weather.

From the kitchen, guests can expect the brand\u2019s own take on American classics, such as its signature chicken and waffles with three chicken breast strips, a sunny side up egg and two Belgian waffles, served with honey butter, maple syrup and green onion.

Additional highlights include Pilsner chicken cobb salad and appetizers such as ahi tuna and short rib queso with beer-cheese sauce, short rib and pico de gallo, served with toasted crostini. To coincide with the drink menu\u2019s local focus, Hester hopes to offer St. Louis-inspired specials in the future, such as toasted ravioli and gooey butter cake.

Whether you stop in for a brew or a tasty meal \u2013 or even both \u2013all of Growler USA\u2019s culinary treats and libations sound like great options before catching A Closer Walk With Patsy Cline at Playhouse @ Westport Plaza.

\u201cWe wanted to go with as many local breweries as we can handle,\u201d Hester says. \u201cI really believe in [the] local economy, and I think that\u2019s what\u2019s great about the craft beer scene. You can find your beer in your market and leave knowing, \u2018That\u2019s my beer and that\u2019s my hometown,\u2019 and I like that pride.\u201d

The handpicked rotating selection of local and regional beverages \u2013 poured by cicerone-certified beer servers \u2013 includes such familiar brewing companies as Civil Life, Urban Chestnut, 4 Hands, Perennial and 2nd Shift. Additional offerings on tap include hard cider, wine and Kaldi\u2019s cold-brewed coffee.

\u201cI just think St. Charles is really starving for the local craft beer scene, and I\u2019m really excited to offer that in a family-friendly environment,\u201d Hester says. \u201cPeople can have access to great breweries in a comfortable setting here and enjoy craft beer the way it was meant to be.\u201d

Growler USA, 3833 Elm St., St. Charles, 636-493-8111, growlerusa.com

"}, {"id":"3347bbe9-aebf-55c2-9444-a8ae08257d54","type":"article","starttime":"1525366800","starttime_iso8601":"2018-05-03T12:00:00-05:00","priority":35,"sections":[{"columns":"arts-and-culture/columns"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Art & Soul: Scott Clark","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/article_3347bbe9-aebf-55c2-9444-a8ae08257d54.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/art-soul-scott-clark/article_3347bbe9-aebf-55c2-9444-a8ae08257d54.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/columns/art-soul-scott-clark/article_3347bbe9-aebf-55c2-9444-a8ae08257d54.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"Perhaps because of the horrifically schismatic times we now occupy, Scott Clark\u2019s Come Find Me in Your Dreams, because of its chromatic and other details, may well prompt a first-glance metallurgical descent into simplistic dichotomy.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["art & soul","scott clark"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da","description":"","byline":"Image courtesy of Scott Clark","hireswidth":2057,"hiresheight":1007,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7e/57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da/5ae9d41a8b424.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1153","height":"886","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7e/57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da/5ae9d41a8a693.image.jpg?crop=1153%2C886%2C443%2C7&resize=1153%2C886&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"77","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7e/57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da/5ae9d41a8a693.image.jpg?crop=1153%2C886%2C443%2C7&resize=100%2C77&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"231","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7e/57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da/5ae9d41a8a693.image.jpg?crop=1153%2C886%2C443%2C7&resize=300%2C231&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"787","url":"https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/7e/57e3e8d8-fac6-52c4-899d-88e55260d5da/5ae9d41a8a693.image.jpg?crop=1153%2C886%2C443%2C7&resize=1024%2C787&order=crop%2Cresize"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"3347bbe9-aebf-55c2-9444-a8ae08257d54","body":"
\"050418-art-Art
050418-art-Art and Soul image

Fracture or fix?

Perhaps because of the horrifically schismatic times we now occupy, Scott Clark\u2019s Come Find Me in Your Dreams, because of its chromatic and other details, may well prompt a first-glance metallurgical descent into simplistic dichotomy.

That is, Clark\u2019s painting (a 48- by 24-inch oil on wood created last year) rather resembles a dangerous breach in the hull of a destroyer or some other seacraft \u2013 or perhaps an emergency weld to heal such a breach.

Only an artistic tyro, of course, would fail to recognize as a blunder the casual imposition of a representational \u201cmeaning\u201d on an abstract work. At a minimum, though, the oneiric title of Come Find Me in Your Dreams seems more than a little suggestive, with the painting as hazy as any dreamscape awaiting a pseudo-soothing jolt of Freud\u2019s sekund\u00e4re \u1e9eearbeitung (\u201csecondary revision\u201d).

\u201cAll my pieces are developed over several months,\u201d Clark relates regarding the painstaking creation of Come Find Me in Your Dreams and his other paintings. \u201cI take between four to five months to add up to 60 layers of transparent oil paint built up over the top of one another. Each layer adds depth, texture and dimension. Once the piece is completed, it\u2019ll dry for another six to nine months. Each painting, no matter the size, is a one-year process.\u201d

A separate artist statement from Clark expands on that comment: \u201cMy most recent work from the past eight years examines the relationships we have with one another, our surroundings and ourselves. My paintings are a journey of feelings and experiences. \u2026

\u201cEach layer is a representation of the complexity of human needs and desires. And each layer takes the painting in a new direction, allowing its story to unfold. With an undetermined ending, every painting\u2019s journey is exciting and real for me. This process allows me the opportunity to discover the truth within the painting.\u201d

Clark (a Belleville native) lives with his wife and son in Columbia, Illinois, where he hones his artwork. He holds a bachelor\u2019s degree from Webster Groves\u2019 Webster University, two master\u2019s degrees from St. Charles\u2019 Lindenwood University and, finally, a doctoral degree (in educational leadership) from Creve Coeur\u2019s Maryville University.

Beyond his painting, Clark\u2019s ongoing teaching and administrative experience has predominantly focused on the Mehlville area of south St. Louis County.

Ultimately, if accidentally, the artist revisits the likely spurious abstract-representational dichotomy mentioned previously.

\u201cCome Find Me in Your Dreams can take on various meanings, depending on the viewer,\u201d Clark says. \u201cFor many, their first impression of the piece and its title may lead one to imagine a person making a connection with another in our most peaceful of environments, our dreams \u2013 while others can imagine it\u2019s one\u2019s search for identity and ultimate perfection.

\u201cI intentionally leave my work open to interpretation. I want the audience to draw upon their own experiences when viewing one of my pieces, to find their own meaning.\u201d\u00a0

To learn more about our featured artist, visit scottclarkartwork.com.

St. Louis-area artists who wish to be considered for future installments of this monthly department of Ladue News should email inquiries to bhollerbach@laduenews.com with “Art and Soul” in the subject line.

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\"CMYK_wwi_02.jpg\"
CMYK_wwi_02.jpg

With signal skill and solemnity, a little-known metro-area institution is saluting the centennial of the Great War that proved variously far less than great, the War to End All Wars that sadly but most emphatically did not.

\u201cOver There: World War I From Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis & Missouri\u201d runs till Dec. 30 in the Old Ordnance Room Museum near the northeast corner of the Jefferson Barracks Historic Site in south St. Louis County.

That exhibition, which opened March 3, begins with the events of January 1918 and continues through the events that led to World War II. It complements an exhibition that ran at the museum last year from May to December and that focused on events in the United States during the early years of WWI, this nation\u2019s entry into that war and the beginning of the massive deployment of U.S. troops overseas. The bulk of the current exhibition chronicles military action \u201cover there\u201d and, as its title suggests, includes several Missouri, St. Louis and Jefferson Barracks components.

The museum, which once reportedly served as a powder magazine, welcomes the public Wednesdays through Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. and charges no admission for the exhibition (while gently noting that a small donation of $3 or so wouldn\u2019t go unappreciated).

Mikall Venso \u2013 the museum curator for the St. Louis County Parks and Recreation Department, the governmental organization that oversees the museum and manifold other area attractions and facilities \u2013 sketches the preparations behind the tandem exhibitions.

\u201cI began researching World War I topics and items in our collection beginning in late 2015,\u201d Venso says. \u201cBy 2016, we determined to best tell the story of the war, we wanted to break the story into two exhibits, each commemorating the centennial of America\u2019s role in the war.\u201d

With its groin-vaulted ceilings and creaky hardwood flooring, the museum makes a pleasantly old-school viewing space, augmented by exquisite lighting and a discreet application of the high-tech enhancements increasingly common in newer museums and similar facilities.

\u201cOver There\u201d opens with two large black-and-white period photos printed on \u00bd-inch-thick foamboard, the first showing three soldiers striving to jury-rig lines of communication amid structural rubble, the second showing two other soldiers patrolling amid different rubble that effectively frames them.

Beyond those photos stands a rather macabre whimsy, a plywood carnivalesque cutout of an enlarged pen-and-ink illustration of a charging, armed doughboy \u2013 the common term for a U.S. infantryman in WWI \u2013 its head carefully removed for photo ops involving a vintage metal helmet there.

The exhibition\u2019s displays then progress clockwise and roughly chronologically through the museum. (\u201cWe\u2019re making you go around so the war wouldn\u2019t be over quite so soon,\u201d a volunteer staffing the reception desk tells a visitor one recent Sunday afternoon as she directs his self-guided tour of the space, which originally leaned toward the counterclockwise.)

Those roughly 15- by 30-inch displays include just shy of three dozen informational placards that generally fall into three categories:

The first, smallest category focuses on personalities from the conflict, ranging from Enoch H. Crowder, who came from Edinburg in northwest Missouri and who subsequently drafted the draft (the dreaded Selective Service Act of 1917); through the young Harry S. Truman, who likewise hailed from this state and served in the U.S. Army during the conflict, later also serving as the nation\u2019s 33rd president; to Woodrow Wilson, who guided the U.S. through the war as its 28th president and who won the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize for his Olympian but controversial efforts.

The second, largest category of placards centers on nonpersonality subjects ranging from women\u2019s contributions to WWI through minorities\u2019 soldiering experience in the conflict to the 1918 influenza pandemic and, even more grimly, forebodings of WWII.

Finally, 13 other map-bearing placards hang on the museum\u2019s northern wall and illuminate battles of the war involving U.S. forces, ranging from Cambrai, France, to Meuse-Argonne, also in France \u2013 the final offensive of WWI before the armistice of Nov. 11, 1918.

Other highlights of \u201cOver There,\u201d whose felicities outnumber the pages needed to catalog them, include:

\u2022 A mannequin wearing a U.S. Army enlisted man\u2019s uniform and gear.

\u2022 A display of weaponry from the war, including rifles, handguns and other implements of destruction.

\u2022 A faux trench at the back of the museum that includes sandbags bearing barbed wire.

\u2022 A second mannequin sporting the uniform of a German infantryman.

\u2022 Six unobtrusive button-activated flat-screens providing insights into various aspects of the war.

\u201cThe most challenging part of creating an exhibit is deciding what not to include, as there\u2019s almost always an abundance of great stories, amazing images and great objects,\u201d Venso concludes. \u201cThe key is to craft a narrative that tells an engaging and informative story that captures visitors\u2019 attention and imagination while helping them learn something new.\u201d

Old Ordnance Room Museum, Jefferson Barracks Historic Site, 546 Bagby Road, St. Louis, 314-615-8800, stlouisco.com


Old Ordnance Side Arms

The World War I-related exhibition now running in the Old Ordnance Room Museum on the Jefferson Barracks Historic Site will involve a quartet of additional public programs in the coming months, all but one of them free:

\u2022 May 20, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.\u2002

\u201cBike Through Time\u201d bicycle tour of the site with St. Louis County

Parks and Recreation museum curator Mikall Venso; $5 advanced

registration online or by phone at 314-615-8800

\u2022 June 9, 1 p.m.\u2002

\u201cWWI: The Legacies of the Great War\u201d program by Venso

\u2022 Aug. 11, 11 a.m.\u2002

\u201cWWI: Men of Bronze\u201d program by county parks educator Tom Hoff

\u2022 Nov. 10, 11 a.m.\u2002

\u201cWWI: Battles of the AEF\u201d program by Hoff

"} ]