[ {"id":"e9b51392-6a13-11e6-aa56-3bbab1d190b0","type":"link","starttime":"1472054400","starttime_iso8601":"2016-08-24T11:00:00-05:00","application":"editorial","title":"RJ Dance Studio 082416","permalink":"http://www.rjdancestudio.com","canonical":"http://www.rjdancestudio.com","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"prologue":"","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"0278d922-6a14-11e6-85eb-eb12fbb00f3d","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"250","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/27/0278d922-6a14-11e6-85eb-eb12fbb00f3d/57bdc4ec58cdf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C250"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"83","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/27/0278d922-6a14-11e6-85eb-eb12fbb00f3d/57bdc4ec58cdf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C83"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"250","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/27/0278d922-6a14-11e6-85eb-eb12fbb00f3d/57bdc4ec58cdf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C250"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"853","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/27/0278d922-6a14-11e6-85eb-eb12fbb00f3d/57bdc4ec58cdf.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":1,"url":"http://www.rjdancestudio.com"}, {"id":"4bf0aed3-e94e-5c45-8210-f6d21c1a3004","type":"article","starttime":"1474563600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1474565316","priority":45,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Football Meets Flavorful Food","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_4bf0aed3-e94e-5c45-8210-f6d21c1a3004.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/football-meets-flavorful-food/article_4bf0aed3-e94e-5c45-8210-f6d21c1a3004.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/football-meets-flavorful-food/article_4bf0aed3-e94e-5c45-8210-f6d21c1a3004.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Shannon Weber","prologue":"Kick off football season with fun and flavorful fan fare.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"686f13d9-df50-5a3f-8c9e-5229134473c5","description":"","byline":"Photos by Emily Suzanne","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/86/686f13d9-df50-5a3f-8c9e-5229134473c5/57e400d157c1a.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/86/686f13d9-df50-5a3f-8c9e-5229134473c5/57e400d157c1a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/86/686f13d9-df50-5a3f-8c9e-5229134473c5/57e400d157c1a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/86/686f13d9-df50-5a3f-8c9e-5229134473c5/57e400d157c1a.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"0410bdec-a293-571b-b0d0-cef72b81fdcb","description":"","byline":"Photos by Emily Suzanne","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/41/0410bdec-a293-571b-b0d0-cef72b81fdcb/57e400d200320.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/41/0410bdec-a293-571b-b0d0-cef72b81fdcb/57e400d200320.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/41/0410bdec-a293-571b-b0d0-cef72b81fdcb/57e400d200320.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/41/0410bdec-a293-571b-b0d0-cef72b81fdcb/57e400d200320.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"66611f2f-87bd-5a26-a4c5-6f28404f8ce0","description":"","byline":"Photos by Emily Suzanne","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/66/66611f2f-87bd-5a26-a4c5-6f28404f8ce0/57e400d26ae47.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/66/66611f2f-87bd-5a26-a4c5-6f28404f8ce0/57e400d26ae47.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/66/66611f2f-87bd-5a26-a4c5-6f28404f8ce0/57e400d26ae47.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/66/66611f2f-87bd-5a26-a4c5-6f28404f8ce0/57e400d26ae47.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"33fd06c2-7584-5cb4-b649-9c3df23b7798","description":"","byline":"Photos by Emily Suzanne","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3f/33fd06c2-7584-5cb4-b649-9c3df23b7798/57e400d0c6208.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3f/33fd06c2-7584-5cb4-b649-9c3df23b7798/57e400d0c6208.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3f/33fd06c2-7584-5cb4-b649-9c3df23b7798/57e400d0c6208.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/3f/33fd06c2-7584-5cb4-b649-9c3df23b7798/57e400d0c6208.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}}],"revision":3,"commentID":"4bf0aed3-e94e-5c45-8210-f6d21c1a3004","body":"
\"Super
Super Bowl - Feast Magazine

Football season is upon us, which means our families and friends are gathering together, donning team colors and huddling around large flat-screen TVs to cheer on our favorite teams.

This year, switch up your football fare. Upgrading doesn\u2019t have to mean fancy \u2013 simply begin with your favorites, and rethink them a bit. Buffalo wings can be a little tired; try wings smothered in a Korean hot sauce and scattered with peanuts. Never serve slow-cooker pulled pork again: Make a superior spice-rubbed version in your oven in the same amount of time. Reinvent your menu, and you\u2019ll be the MVP, no matter who wins the game.

Strategy is critical: Making this much food at one time requires a well-laid plan. A double oven makes things easier, but if you have a single oven, stagger your hot items. Better yet, bake your wings in the morning before throwing your pulled pork in, but leave the sauce off. Once the pork is out and resting, reheat the wings at 400\u00b0F for 15 to 20 minutes until hot, toss in the sauce and finish the bake time. Save the nacho bar for halftime: People love something new and piping hot on the table midgame. Close out the meal with sweet and fun ice-cream sandwich \u201cfootballs.\u201d

Gochujang Hot Wings With Coconut-Cilantro Dip \u2013 Serves | 8 to 10

Gochujang, a Korean hot sauce similar to but sweeter than Sriracha, is a perfectly unexpected choice for hot wings. You\u2019ll find it in any well-stocked grocery store.

Coconut-Cilantro Dip

Gochujang Hot Wings

To Serve

| Preparation \u2013 Coconut-Cilantro Dip | In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil. Add shallot and cook until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Add garlic and ginger, and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Remove from heat and stir in vinegar.

In the bowl of a food processor or blender, add yogurt and coconut milk. Add lime juice, cilantro and shallot mixture; blend until smooth and mixture is freckled with cilantro leaves. Transfer to jar and refrigerate at least 1 hour.

| Preparation \u2013 Gochujang Hot Wings | Preheat oven to 400\u00b0F.

Line 2 lipped baking sheets with heavy-duty aluminum foil, up and over sides. In a large bowl, add wing pieces and olive oil; toss until coated. Divide onto prepared pans, leaving space between pieces. Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 45 to 50 minutes until wings are browned and crispy.

While wings roast, in a medium bowl, combine remaining wing ingredients; whisk to blend. Set aside.

When wings are cooked through, remove from oven and toss in gochujang mixture until coated. Remove foil from baking sheets, and place wings back on hot pans, spreading out in a single layer. Place back in oven until sauce has heated and wings have begun to caramelize, about 8 minutes, watching carefully so wings don\u2019t burn.

| To Serve | Pile wings on a platter and garnish with peanuts, scallions and cilantro leaves; set lime wedges alongside. Serve with chilled coconut-cilantro dip.

Spice-Rubbed Oven Pulled Pork \u2013 Serves | 8 to 10

\"Super
Super Bowl - Feast Magazine

Having a little extra fat on the pork is especially nice if you\u2019re making this the day ahead and rewarming; it stays juicy and moist on its own, without the need to add extra liquid. Toasting the spices makes a huge difference in your flavor, too, so don\u2019t cheat and skip that step.

Spice Rub

Pulled Pork

| Preparation \u2013 Spice Rub |

In a cold stainless steel skillet over medium heat, add fennel, cumin and coriander seeds. Toast, flipping seeds frequently to prevent burning, until fragrant and toasted. Remove from heat and transfer to mortar and pestle. Add juniper and allspice berries, and crush with pestle until finely ground. Add remaining spices and stir until combined.

Set aside.

| Preparation \u2013 Pulled Pork | Preheat oven to 325\u00b0F.

Line a large lipped baking sheet with heavy-duty aluminum foil, up and over the sides. Set out pork shoulder for at least 30 to 45 minutes to take off chill. Using your hands, rub spice rub firmly into all sides of pork shoulder, and place fat-side up on prepared baking sheet. Cook for 3\u00bd to 4 hours until meat is nicely browned and falls easily from bone when pulled. Remove from oven and cool for 30 to 40 minutes until easy to handle.

| To Serve | Shred pork from bone and transfer to slow cooker set on warm. Serve with barbecue sauce on dollar rolls.

\"Super
Super Bowl - Feast Magazine

Halftime Loaded Skillet Nacho Bar \u2013 Serves | 4 to 6

They\u2019re called halftime nachos for a reason: They take mere minutes to make, and partygoers love something to munch on when they get up to stretch and refill drinks. These are vegetarian as written, but I advise the meat-lovers to throw some of the spice-rubbed oven pulled pork on these in lieu of or in addition to the beans before adding toppings.

Cheese Sauce

Loaded Nachos

To Serve

| Preparation \u2013 Cheese Sauce | In a small saucepan, heat milk until steaming, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan over medium heat, melt butter; add flour and whisk until smooth and cooked, 3 to 4 minutes. As you whisk, slowly stream milk into flour mixture; raise heat to medium high, and continue to whisk until mixture is smooth and bubbling, and thickens slightly. Slowly add both cheeses, whisking as you do so, until smooth consistency forms. Decrease heat to low and stir in chiles; keep warm until ready to use.

| Preparation \u2013 Loaded Nachos | Preheat broiler and set a rack 8 inches from top of oven. In a large, heavy skillet set over medium-high heat, heat olive oil; add shallot and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes. Add peppers and corn, increase heat to high and cook for 8 to 10 minutes until vegetables are nicely charred in places. Remove from heat, season to taste with salt and pepper and keep warm.

In a 12-inch cast-iron skillet, spread out half of tortilla chips and top with half of black beans. Drizzle 1 cup cheese sauce over top, leaving a 1-inch border around edge of chips. Top with half of corn-pepper mixture, and drizzle another \u00bd cup cheese sauce. Repeat with another layer of chips, beans, cheese sauce and vegetables; finish with shredded Monterey Jack over top. Place in oven to broil for 10 minutes until cheese is bubbling, browned on top and heated through.

| To Serve | Place all ingredients in separate bowls and set up as a toppings bar. Serve nachos immediately straight out of cast-iron skillet alongside toppings.

\"Super
Super Bowl - Feast Magazine

Homemade Graham Cracker Ice-Cream Sandwich \u201cFootballs\u201d \u2013 Yields | 16 to 20 sandwiches

These ice-cream sandwiches are a perfectly sweet end to any Super Bowl party. Make these with any ice-cream flavor you wish, or for a more indulgent treat, mix crushed chocolate candy into softened ice cream, refreeze and assemble.

Graham Crackers

Royal Icing

| Preparation \u2013 Graham Crackers | In a large mixing bowl, add both flours, baking soda and salt; whisk until combined and set aside. In bowl of a stand mixer on high, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy, 7 minutes. Scrape down sides of bowl, and add milk, honey, molasses and vanilla, then beat until incorporated, 3 minutes, scraping down bowl as needed. Set mixer to low and add flour mixture to butter mixture in 2 parts; stir until just combined and mixture comes together. Release bowl from stand, and use a spatula to incorporate any dry patches. Transfer dough to counter, press together and shape into a 1-inch flat rectangle. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 4 hours.

Preheat oven to 350\u02daF, and line 2 rimless baking sheets with parchment paper. Remove dough from refrigerator, and set out on counter to soften slightly. Lightly dust work surface with flour, and roll out dough to \u00bc-inch thickness. Use an oval or football-shaped cookie cutter to cut out crackers, and set 1 inch apart on prepared sheets. Bake both sheets at once, rotating halfway through, for 15 to 17 minutes, until crackers take on a small amount of color around edges and bottom, being careful not to overbake. Remove and let cool on pans for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

| Preparation \u2013 Royal Icing | In a large bowl using an electric mixer, beat egg whites until foamy. Beat in powdered sugar 1 cup at a time, beating after each addition until incorporated. Stir in vanilla until combined, and check consistency: Icing should be smooth but solid enough to hold its shape when piped. Add more powdered sugar as needed to thicken, or use a little water to thin out until desired consistency is reached. Add icing to a piping bag with a rounded tip, and decorate half of crackers with lacing, then trim to resemble footballs.

| Assembly | Place cooled cookies on work surface, and remove ice cream from freezer. Using a small (1-ounce) ice-cream scoop, scoop 2 balls of ice cream onto an undecorated graham cracker, 1 right next to the other. Press a decorated cracker on top of the ice cream, firmly from center, until ice cream reaches edge of crackers. Use an offset spatula to smooth around perimeter so ice cream is even. Place all in a large, airtight container, and store in freezer immediately after assembling until ready to serve; if needed, layer between sheets of parchment paper to protect decoration. Remove from freezer and serve immediately when ready.

"}, {"id":"2fecc804-f464-576a-bd12-31cf00a27ee3","type":"article","starttime":"1474563600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T12:00:00-05:00","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Five Aces Bar-B-Que","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_2fecc804-f464-576a-bd12-31cf00a27ee3.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-five-aces-bar-b-que/article_2fecc804-f464-576a-bd12-31cf00a27ee3.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-five-aces-bar-b-que/article_2fecc804-f464-576a-bd12-31cf00a27ee3.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mabel Suen","prologue":"In the Shaw neighborhood, new signage will soon replace the marker on the late local mainstay Mama Josephine\u2019s.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["five aces bar-b-que","shaw","mama josephine's"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"77acac5d-eeea-5466-a372-bcbfa9213921","description":"","byline":"Photo by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"542","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/7a/77acac5d-eeea-5466-a372-bcbfa9213921/57d190ac281cb.image.jpg?resize=760%2C542"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/7a/77acac5d-eeea-5466-a372-bcbfa9213921/57d190ac281cb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/7a/77acac5d-eeea-5466-a372-bcbfa9213921/57d190ac281cb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"731","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/7a/77acac5d-eeea-5466-a372-bcbfa9213921/57d190ac281cb.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C731"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"2fecc804-f464-576a-bd12-31cf00a27ee3","body":"
\"LadueNews_FiveAces_20160908_ByMabelSuen_01.jpg\"
LadueNews_FiveAces_20160908_ByMabelSuen_01.jpg

In the Shaw neighborhood, new signage will soon replace the marker on the late local mainstay Mama Josephine\u2019s. Comfort-food fanatics need not fret, however; the spot\u2019s latest proprietors intend to carry on Mama Josephine\u2019s family-focused tradition of from-scratch cooking with their own flavorful flair.

Fives Ace Bar-B-Que opened in the 720-square-foot space in April. The menu combines a few favorites from Mary Samuelson\u2019s Mama Josephine\u2019s menu with Five Aces\u2019 brand of home-style barbecue. The concept comes from Air Force veterans Antonio and Toshia Ellis.

Antonio Ellis grew up in Sikeston, Missouri, learning how to cook at an early age from family members, including his grandmother, who was a professional chef. Fives Aces, which gets its name from the shared initials of Ellis and his four sons, began in local parking lots.

While he was grilling in his University City backyard a few years ago, the fragrant scent of barbecue began to attract the attention of friends, family and neighbors, who encouraged Ellis to make his smoked meats available for sale. He vended at local events such as the St. Louis Swap Meet before deciding to open his own storefront.

His agreement with Samuelson was a serendipitous one. He approached her through a Craigslist ad not for the space, initially, but for a set of dishes. A couple of months later, an interest in dining room wares turned into a complete buyout of the business.

\u201cWe talked for a long time and found out that we had a lot of things in common, like being from the South and cooking pretty much the same way \u2013 the same style,\u201d Ellis says. \u201cWe just had a great rapport. We were on the same page. She asked me if I wanted to cook the next day at the restaurant, and I gave it a try. It was well received, and next thing I knew, I was buying her out.

\u201cBecause she has a full-time job already, the long hours at the restaurant just weren\u2019t healthy for her. She needed to focus on retirement,\u201d Ellis explains. \u201cBut I had no intention of any of this happening. It all still feels surreal to me.\u201d

Samuelson worked with Ellis to perfect the execution of her mother\u2019s recipes, including fan favorites such as chicken and dumplings, catfish, chicken-fried steak and meatloaf. To complement the comfort classics, Ellis cooks up pork steaks, baby-back ribs, beef brisket, turkey ribs and more.

Meats get cooked over an open flame with hickory wood and Ellis\u2019 signature no-salt seasoning technique. To develop his special blend of herbs and spices, he and his sons sat down at the kitchen table with nearly 40 different seasonings, tirelessly testing combinations until they landed on an addictive concoction good enough to eat with a spoon.

Ellis works with two steel smokers \u2013 dubbed Big Daryl and Charlotte after beloved family members \u2013 to cook up his specialties. Choose from dishes such as rib-tip or pulled pork sandwiches with salads and sides including crispy broccoli salad, candied yams and fried okra. House-made desserts include peach cobbler and pecan pie.

\u201cThis place is the perfect marriage \u2013 Mama Josephine\u2019s paired with my style of barbecue. [Samuelson\u2019s] very sincere about what she does, and I am, too,\u201d he says. \u201cThis isn\u2019t just about Five Aces. This is about carrying on her mother\u2019s legacy. I honor and respect her enough to treat her items on the menu with as much love as my own.\u201d

Five Aces Bar-B-Que, 4000 Shaw Blvd., St. Louis, 314-771-4001, fiveacesbbq.com

"}, {"id":"834d6870-de94-517c-8a09-808711bbcfa5","type":"article","starttime":"1474563600","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-22T12:00:00-05:00","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"The Wine Life: Three Wines Worth Falling For","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_834d6870-de94-517c-8a09-808711bbcfa5.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/the-wine-life-three-wines-worth-falling-for/article_834d6870-de94-517c-8a09-808711bbcfa5.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/the-wine-life-three-wines-worth-falling-for/article_834d6870-de94-517c-8a09-808711bbcfa5.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Stanley Browne","prologue":"092316 wineWhen seasons change, wine experiences rise to the level of an art. Enter autumn with lighter-style wines as the heat and humidity of summer slowly yield to cool tranquility. 2015 HUGL, GR\u00dcNER VELTLINER \u2013 NIEDER\u00d6STERREICH, AUSTRIA 100% Gr\u00fcner Veltliner Owners: Martin and Sylvia Hugl Aged: Stainless steel, no oak","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["wine life"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"69cef76e-677b-5ad1-8ad7-689839156677","description":"","byline":"By Sarah Conard","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"663","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9c/69cef76e-677b-5ad1-8ad7-689839156677/57d19cd401454.image.jpg?resize=663%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"115","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9c/69cef76e-677b-5ad1-8ad7-689839156677/57d19cd401454.image.jpg?resize=100%2C115"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"344","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9c/69cef76e-677b-5ad1-8ad7-689839156677/57d19cd401454.image.jpg?resize=300%2C344"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1173","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/9c/69cef76e-677b-5ad1-8ad7-689839156677/57d19cd401454.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1173"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"834d6870-de94-517c-8a09-808711bbcfa5","body":"
\"092316
092316 wine

When seasons change, wine experiences rise to the level of an art. Enter autumn with lighter-style wines as the heat and humidity of summer slowly yield to cool tranquility.

2015 HUGL, GR\u00dcNER VELTLINER \u2013 NIEDER\u00d6STERREICH, AUSTRIA

100% Gr\u00fcner Veltliner

Owners: Martin and Sylvia Hugl

Aged: Stainless steel, no oak

Approximate Retail Price: $17 (1-liter bottle)

TASTING NOTES:

Color: Light straw

Aroma: Grapefruit, stone fruit, pineapple, limes

Taste: Citrus notes balanced with stone fruit, flint mineral, white pepper and a nice acidity

Gr\u00fcner Veltliner (GROO-ner velt-LEAN-er) has increased in popularity during the last 15 years and become the darling of sommeliers for its ability to pair with greens, such as asparagus and artichokes, which typically fight wine. This vintage goes well with enjoying an evening on the patio or accentuating a meal.

Food Pairings: A light, crisp wine like this pairs nicely with fish, pork, scallops, sushi, veal, asparagus and artichoke.

2015 DOMAINE LA COLOMBE, ROS\u00c9 \u2013 PROVENCE, FRANCE

Grenache/Cinsault/Syrah

Owner: Jean-Jacques Br\u00e9ban

Aged: Stainless steel, no oak

Approximate Retail Price: $14

TASTING NOTES:

Color: Pale strawberry

Aroma: Strawberry, nectarine, honeysuckle

Taste: Red berry, strawberry, stone fruit flavors with subtle hints of succulent herbs

Provence in the south of France is known for ros\u00e9 \u2013 usually a blend of grapes, very clean in style, yet dry. Provence ros\u00e9 comes from red grapes, and skin-color pigments give wine its color. In the making of ros\u00e9, the skin remains in contact with the juice for a relatively limited time, until the desired color emerges.

Usually the grapes are picked at night or early morning so they don\u2019t warm overmuch. They then go to 57-degree cellars before being brought to a chai, a wine storage building. There the grapes are washed and destemmed.

Provence ros\u00e9 usually goes through direct pressing, wherein grapes are pressed to remove the juice and experience only slight contact with the skins. After that, the juice from owner Jean-Jacques Br\u00e9ban\u2019s fruit ferments in large stainless steel tanks at about 64 degrees for eight to 15 days. Finally, the finished grapes/wines are blended to create the house-style ros\u00e9.

Food Pairings: Charcuterie, barbecue, grilled fish, p\u00e2t\u00e9, pork, salad, shrimp and vegetables all would accompany this vintage agreeably.

2014 CHARLY TH\u00c9VENET, GAMAY \u2013 R\u00c9GNI\u00c9, BEAUJOLAIS, FRANCE

100% Gamay

Importer: Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, 525 cases produced

Aged: Old Burgundy barrels

Approximate Retail Price: $32

TASTING NOTES:

Color: Garnet red

Aroma: Ripe red cherry and wild berry, earthy notes, while yielding lower alcohol on the nose.

Taste: Medium skin and oak tannins, lighter on the palate with refreshing red fruit flavors of cherry, raspberry and hints of licorice, with subtle earthiness from the nose; a soft finish with mellow acidity and lingering fruit

R\u00e9gni\u00e9 ranks as one of the 10 Cru appellations in Beaujolais (incidentally, think of age worthy of Beaujolais, which differs vastly from the familiar Beaujolais Nouveau). R\u00e9gni\u00e9 exhibits a terroir of granite soil and, here, 80-year-old vines farmed Biodynamically.

Wines from that area are usually very aromatic and show best at three to five years, although Beaujolais from the right vintage will age 20 years.

Food Pairings: Definitely enjoy cheeses of the same region (for instance, Brie, Fromager d\u2019Affinois, D\u00e9lice de Bourgogne and Camembert), mushrooms, stewed or braised meats, chicken with gravylike sauces, and chocolate.

Certified Sommelier Stanley Browne owns Robust Wine Bar in Webster Groves and Downtown at the MX.

"}, {"id":"6c48ca54-7ea7-11e6-91d2-7b208d41df64","type":"article","starttime":"1474316820","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-19T15:27:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1474559054","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Sister Act","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_6c48ca54-7ea7-11e6-91d2-7b208d41df64.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-sister-act/article_6c48ca54-7ea7-11e6-91d2-7b208d41df64.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-sister-act/article_6c48ca54-7ea7-11e6-91d2-7b208d41df64.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":10,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"The sensational talents of Dan\u2019yelle Williamson as Deloris and Corinne Melancon as Mother Superior rise above the clich\u00e9d script to make STAGES St. Louis\u2019 season-closing production of\u00a0Sister Act\u00a0a divinely inspired musical comedy.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["sister act","whoopi goldberg","stages st. louis","reim theatre","kirkwood civic center","kirkwood community center","musical","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"2ef46a26-7ea9-11e6-96e7-bf1a28e77ef8","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ef/2ef46a26-7ea9-11e6-96e7-bf1a28e77ef8/57e04d0a5c4bf.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ef/2ef46a26-7ea9-11e6-96e7-bf1a28e77ef8/57e04d0a5c4bf.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ef/2ef46a26-7ea9-11e6-96e7-bf1a28e77ef8/57e04d0a5c4bf.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/ef/2ef46a26-7ea9-11e6-96e7-bf1a28e77ef8/57e04d0a5c4bf.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"39994730-7ea9-11e6-926b-5b0959654af5","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/99/39994730-7ea9-11e6-926b-5b0959654af5/57e04d1c39776.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/99/39994730-7ea9-11e6-926b-5b0959654af5/57e04d1c39776.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/99/39994730-7ea9-11e6-926b-5b0959654af5/57e04d1c39776.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/99/39994730-7ea9-11e6-926b-5b0959654af5/57e04d1c39776.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"4452e884-7ea9-11e6-9f58-af263a3e78d1","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/45/4452e884-7ea9-11e6-9f58-af263a3e78d1/57e04d2e3814c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/45/4452e884-7ea9-11e6-9f58-af263a3e78d1/57e04d2e3814c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/45/4452e884-7ea9-11e6-9f58-af263a3e78d1/57e04d2e3814c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/45/4452e884-7ea9-11e6-9f58-af263a3e78d1/57e04d2e3814c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"4e5aaf7e-7ea9-11e6-be58-0306972ceb4b","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"541","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e5/4e5aaf7e-7ea9-11e6-be58-0306972ceb4b/57e04d3f0db78.image.jpg?resize=760%2C541"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"71","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e5/4e5aaf7e-7ea9-11e6-be58-0306972ceb4b/57e04d3f0db78.image.jpg?resize=100%2C71"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"214","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e5/4e5aaf7e-7ea9-11e6-be58-0306972ceb4b/57e04d3f0db78.image.jpg?resize=300%2C214"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"729","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/e5/4e5aaf7e-7ea9-11e6-be58-0306972ceb4b/57e04d3f0db78.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C729"}}},{"id":"5b8193de-7ea9-11e6-84d6-d3ca25713135","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"370","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b8/5b8193de-7ea9-11e6-84d6-d3ca25713135/57e04d551de0d.image.jpg?resize=760%2C370"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"49","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b8/5b8193de-7ea9-11e6-84d6-d3ca25713135/57e04d551de0d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C49"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"146","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b8/5b8193de-7ea9-11e6-84d6-d3ca25713135/57e04d551de0d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C146"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"499","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/b8/5b8193de-7ea9-11e6-84d6-d3ca25713135/57e04d551de0d.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C499"}}},{"id":"68b0a892-7ea9-11e6-9b2c-db1ed14e1732","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8b/68b0a892-7ea9-11e6-9b2c-db1ed14e1732/57e04d6b3adea.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8b/68b0a892-7ea9-11e6-9b2c-db1ed14e1732/57e04d6b3adea.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8b/68b0a892-7ea9-11e6-9b2c-db1ed14e1732/57e04d6b3adea.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/8b/68b0a892-7ea9-11e6-9b2c-db1ed14e1732/57e04d6b3adea.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"738c7aac-7ea9-11e6-a724-57db5991a377","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/738c7aac-7ea9-11e6-a724-57db5991a377/57e04d7d702d9.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/738c7aac-7ea9-11e6-a724-57db5991a377/57e04d7d702d9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/738c7aac-7ea9-11e6-a724-57db5991a377/57e04d7d702d9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/38/738c7aac-7ea9-11e6-a724-57db5991a377/57e04d7d702d9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"7f83c716-7ea9-11e6-82a6-b708c7f6539d","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f83c716-7ea9-11e6-82a6-b708c7f6539d/57e04d918238e.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f83c716-7ea9-11e6-82a6-b708c7f6539d/57e04d918238e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f83c716-7ea9-11e6-82a6-b708c7f6539d/57e04d918238e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/f8/7f83c716-7ea9-11e6-82a6-b708c7f6539d/57e04d918238e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"888801b0-7ea9-11e6-971d-2bd81975dc96","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/88/888801b0-7ea9-11e6-971d-2bd81975dc96/57e04da0a19e4.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/88/888801b0-7ea9-11e6-971d-2bd81975dc96/57e04da0a19e4.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/88/888801b0-7ea9-11e6-971d-2bd81975dc96/57e04da0a19e4.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/88/888801b0-7ea9-11e6-971d-2bd81975dc96/57e04da0a19e4.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"924b7f6a-7ea9-11e6-adde-876c43b9d4ce","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/24/924b7f6a-7ea9-11e6-adde-876c43b9d4ce/57e04db10a6b5.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/24/924b7f6a-7ea9-11e6-adde-876c43b9d4ce/57e04db10a6b5.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/24/924b7f6a-7ea9-11e6-adde-876c43b9d4ce/57e04db10a6b5.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/24/924b7f6a-7ea9-11e6-adde-876c43b9d4ce/57e04db10a6b5.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"6c48ca54-7ea7-11e6-91d2-7b208d41df64","body":"

Story: Deloris Van Cartier is hoping to take her stage act in the 1970s to the big time. For now, though, she has a small-time show she performs at the night club run by her boyfriend, Curtis Jackson. She\u2019s further disappointed when Curtis gives her a Christmas gift by mistake that was intended for his wife.

Deloris\u2019 life goes from bad to worse, though, when she witnesses Curtis and his henchmen, T.J., Pablo and Joey, kill a man in cold blood. Deloris manages to escape and heads to the local Philadelphia police station, where her high school classmate, \u201cSweaty Eddie,\u201d is on the force and vows to protect her.

While awaiting a court date when Deloris can testify against Curtis, Eddie stashes her away in a nearby convent with the consent of the Mother Superior. Deloris, dressed like all the other nuns, is introduced as Sister Mary Clarence, a nun who has been sent from another convent.

Although she clashes with the iron-willed Mother Superior and chafes at her chaste and hermetic new life style, Deloris comes to life when she hears the woeful strains of the nuns\u2019 choir. She volunteers to lead the sisters in song, and soon their rejuvenated voices have become the hit of the archdiocese and all of Philadelphia.

They even draw the attention of Curtis, who realizes where Deloris is hiding and decides to track her down. Can the \u201cjoyful noise\u201d of the sisters and the heroics of Eddie save Deloris from a violent death?

Highlights: The sensational talents of Dan\u2019yelle Williamson as Deloris and Corinne Melancon as Mother Superior rise above the clich\u00e9d script to make STAGES St. Louis\u2019 season-closing production of Sister Act a divinely inspired musical comedy.

Other Info: Sister Act originated in 1992 as a movie that starred Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith and Harvey Keitel and proved to be one of the biggest box-office successes of the 1990s. A musical version debuted in 1996, with a book by former Cheers staff writers Cheri Steinkellner and Bill Steinkellner, music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Glenn Slater.

Following a West End production in London in 2009, a Broadway version with additional book material by Douglas Carter Beane opened in 2011 and garnered five Tony Award nominations, including Best Musical.

While Sister Act appeared at The Fox in a touring production in 2013, the Stages presentation marks the musical\u2019s Midwest regional theater premiere. Stages\u2019 version, stylishly directed by artistic director Michael Hamilton, is buoyed by some sensational choreography designed by Stephen Bourneuf and the exuberant singing of the lively sisters\u2019 ensemble.

Williamson displays a smashingly powerful voice that resonates on big numbers such as Raise Your Voice and Sunday Morning Fever, when the quiet and off-tune choir is resurrected by Deloris\u2019 lively personality and persuasive stage presence into a resonating sound of beauty.

While it\u2019s disappointing that the writers mention that Deloris went to Catholic schools for 12 years and yet doesn\u2019t recognize the smell of incense, there\u2019s more than enough pizzazz in the portrayals of various characters to make Sister Act enjoyable both musically and comically.

Melancon, who was wonderful earlier this summer at Stages as the title character in The Drowsy Chaperone, beautifully captures the disciplined, resilient demeanor of Mother Superior, demonstrating her own considerable singing talents on numbers such as Within These Walls and I Haven\u2019t Got a Prayer.

The show\u2019s best comic bit occurs in Act I when Deloris is joined at a local dive bar on Christmas night by the \u201cperky\u201d Sister Mary Patrick and young postulate Mary Robert. Watching Sarah Michelle Cuc and Leah Berry as the nun and postulate, respectively, loosening their limbs in a \u2018dance\u2019 at the bar is sheer comic delight. Cuc and Berry are terrific in their roles throughout the show, with Cuc basically stealing the first act with her infectious charm.

The big, brash numbers featuring the full ensemble explode on the modest stage at the Reim Theatre, courtesy of choreographer Bourneuf as well as musical director Lisa Campbell Albert and Stuart Elmore\u2019s orchestral design. James Wolk\u2019s scenic design provides effective settings for the abbey and the accompanying church, with other scenes in nightclubs and a police station positioned up front.

Sean Savoie\u2019s rainbow of hues in his lighting design accentuates the settings, while Brad Musgrove captures the garish exaggerations of \u201870s attire favored by Curtis and his henchmen.

The entertaining cast includes Steve Isom as the stereotypical Irish priest, Curtis Wiley as the earnest Eddie, who is sweet on Deloris, and Kent Overshown as the bullying Jackson. Kevin Curtis is Jackson\u2019s fast-talking nephew T.J., Keith Boyer is the excitable, Spanish-speaking Pablo and Myles McHale is the slow-witted Joey, all of whom share an amusing moment in chains in the finale.

The sisters, who have their share of eccentricities, include Peggy Billo as the bespectacled, piano-playing Sister Mary Theresa and Michele Burdette Elmore as the overbearing but amusing Sister Mary Lazarus.

Kari Ely is the doddering Sister Mary Martin-of-Tours, while others in habits feature Morgan Amiel Faulkner, Angela Sapolis, Julia Johanos, Paula Landry, Laura Ernst, Erin Kelley, April Strelinger and Jessie Hooker.

Faulkner and Hooker double as Deloris\u2019 back-up duo in her nightclub act and Ely portrays a waitress at the dive bar where John Flack plays the bartender. Daniel Leclaire and Christian Bufford portray a pair of rockin\u2019 altar boys, and Christopher DeProphetis completes the cast as a bar patron.

While the dialogue at times is painfully corny or trite, Hamilton\u2019s lively pacing and the superb sounds of the choir make Sister Act a \u2018joyful noise,\u2019 indeed.

Musical: Sister Act

Company: STAGES St. Louis

Venue: Reim Theatre, Kirkwood Civic Center, 111 South Geyer Road

Dates: Through October 9

Tickets: $20-$59; contact 821-2407 or stagesstlouis.org (an additional performance already has been added at 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29)

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Peter Wochniak

"}, {"id":"7fc7e76c-7dc2-11e6-a9bb-d346f75ee6a2","type":"article","starttime":"1474218480","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-18T12:08:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1474219210","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder' Is a 'Silly Walk' for Monty Python Fans: Musical Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_7fc7e76c-7dc2-11e6-a9bb-d346f75ee6a2.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/gentleman-s-guide-to-love-and-murder-is-a-silly/article_7fc7e76c-7dc2-11e6-a9bb-d346f75ee6a2.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/gentleman-s-guide-to-love-and-murder-is-a-silly/article_7fc7e76c-7dc2-11e6-a9bb-d346f75ee6a2.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":10,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: A young man sits in a London jail in 1909. He\u2019s awaiting possible execution for murder, one he says he didn\u2019t commit. For the record, though, Monty Navarro is penning his memoirs, which he titles A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder. It seems that two years earlier Monty was an impoverished lad who had just buried his mum. Shortly thereafter he\u2019s visited by a mysterious woman named Miss Shingle, who informs him that he actually is from an aristocratic family. Miss Shingle tells Monty that his mother was disowned by the stately D\u2019Ysquiths for eloping with a Spanish musician, who has since died.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["monty python","the fox theatre","fabulous fox","gentleman's guide to love and murder","tony awards","theater","musical","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"a46ea322-7c4f-11e6-890a-d703d266bbce","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/46/a46ea322-7c4f-11e6-890a-d703d266bbce/57dc5bd26b4ee.image.jpg?resize=760%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/46/a46ea322-7c4f-11e6-890a-d703d266bbce/57dc5bd26b4ee.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/46/a46ea322-7c4f-11e6-890a-d703d266bbce/57dc5bd26b4ee.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/46/a46ea322-7c4f-11e6-890a-d703d266bbce/57dc5bd26b4ee.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C690"}}},{"id":"adf6686c-7c4f-11e6-83af-7b5a5a92b781","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"501","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/df/adf6686c-7c4f-11e6-83af-7b5a5a92b781/57dc5be2689f1.image.jpg?resize=501%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"152","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/df/adf6686c-7c4f-11e6-83af-7b5a5a92b781/57dc5be2689f1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C152"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"456","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/df/adf6686c-7c4f-11e6-83af-7b5a5a92b781/57dc5be2689f1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C456"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1555","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/df/adf6686c-7c4f-11e6-83af-7b5a5a92b781/57dc5be2689f1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"0fb6fa0e-7c4f-11e6-8833-971540e4b683","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fb/0fb6fa0e-7c4f-11e6-8833-971540e4b683/57dc5ad8e42c0.image.jpg?resize=760%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fb/0fb6fa0e-7c4f-11e6-8833-971540e4b683/57dc5ad8e42c0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fb/0fb6fa0e-7c4f-11e6-8833-971540e4b683/57dc5ad8e42c0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fb/0fb6fa0e-7c4f-11e6-8833-971540e4b683/57dc5ad8e42c0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1024"}}},{"id":"252fe094-7c4f-11e6-9cfa-039a34996097","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/52/252fe094-7c4f-11e6-9cfa-039a34996097/57dc5afce9c87.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/52/252fe094-7c4f-11e6-9cfa-039a34996097/57dc5afce9c87.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/52/252fe094-7c4f-11e6-9cfa-039a34996097/57dc5afce9c87.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/52/252fe094-7c4f-11e6-9cfa-039a34996097/57dc5afce9c87.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"431b804a-7c4f-11e6-b9c7-9f82626f3b86","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/431b804a-7c4f-11e6-b9c7-9f82626f3b86/57dc5b2f25fef.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/431b804a-7c4f-11e6-b9c7-9f82626f3b86/57dc5b2f25fef.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/431b804a-7c4f-11e6-b9c7-9f82626f3b86/57dc5b2f25fef.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/31/431b804a-7c4f-11e6-b9c7-9f82626f3b86/57dc5b2f25fef.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"52ffe08c-7c4f-11e6-9139-53bb7a133d58","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ffe08c-7c4f-11e6-9139-53bb7a133d58/57dc5b49c7631.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ffe08c-7c4f-11e6-9139-53bb7a133d58/57dc5b49c7631.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ffe08c-7c4f-11e6-9139-53bb7a133d58/57dc5b49c7631.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/2f/52ffe08c-7c4f-11e6-9139-53bb7a133d58/57dc5b49c7631.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"62c885f0-7c4f-11e6-90c5-f7f7351f664f","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"532","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62c885f0-7c4f-11e6-90c5-f7f7351f664f/57dc5b6448fe0.image.jpg?resize=760%2C532"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"70","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62c885f0-7c4f-11e6-90c5-f7f7351f664f/57dc5b6448fe0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C70"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"210","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62c885f0-7c4f-11e6-90c5-f7f7351f664f/57dc5b6448fe0.image.jpg?resize=300%2C210"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"717","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/2c/62c885f0-7c4f-11e6-90c5-f7f7351f664f/57dc5b6448fe0.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C717"}}},{"id":"7b96323a-7c4f-11e6-b046-9f0c88813e36","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"511","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b9/7b96323a-7c4f-11e6-b046-9f0c88813e36/57dc5b8dde8e6.image.jpg?resize=511%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"149","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b9/7b96323a-7c4f-11e6-b046-9f0c88813e36/57dc5b8dde8e6.image.jpg?resize=100%2C149"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"446","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b9/7b96323a-7c4f-11e6-b046-9f0c88813e36/57dc5b8dde8e6.image.jpg?resize=300%2C446"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1522","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/b9/7b96323a-7c4f-11e6-b046-9f0c88813e36/57dc5b8dde8e6.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"8d6b77f4-7c4f-11e6-886b-779e949f3719","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"486","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d6b77f4-7c4f-11e6-886b-779e949f3719/57dc5babcad49.image.jpg?resize=760%2C486"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"64","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d6b77f4-7c4f-11e6-886b-779e949f3719/57dc5babcad49.image.jpg?resize=100%2C64"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"192","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d6b77f4-7c4f-11e6-886b-779e949f3719/57dc5babcad49.image.jpg?resize=300%2C192"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"655","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/8/d6/8d6b77f4-7c4f-11e6-886b-779e949f3719/57dc5babcad49.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C655"}}},{"id":"98ab17b4-7c4f-11e6-bb2e-4bc426800ecf","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"512","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/8a/98ab17b4-7c4f-11e6-bb2e-4bc426800ecf/57dc5bbeab793.image.jpg?resize=760%2C512"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/8a/98ab17b4-7c4f-11e6-bb2e-4bc426800ecf/57dc5bbeab793.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"202","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/8a/98ab17b4-7c4f-11e6-bb2e-4bc426800ecf/57dc5bbeab793.image.jpg?resize=300%2C202"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"690","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/8a/98ab17b4-7c4f-11e6-bb2e-4bc426800ecf/57dc5bbeab793.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C690"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"7fc7e76c-7dc2-11e6-a9bb-d346f75ee6a2","body":"

Story: A young man sits in a London jail in 1909. He\u2019s awaiting possible execution for murder, one he says he didn\u2019t commit. For the record, though, Monty Navarro is penning his memoirs, which he titles A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder.

It seems that two years earlier Monty was an impoverished lad who had just buried his mum. Shortly thereafter he\u2019s visited by a mysterious woman named Miss Shingle, who informs him that he actually is from an aristocratic family. Miss Shingle tells Monty that his mother was disowned by the stately D\u2019Ysquiths for eloping with a Spanish musician, who has since died.

Having been told that he is ninth in line for the earldom of Highhurst, Monty informs his beloved Sibella Hallward of his potential wealth. She coolly replies that he\u2019d have to kill off eight people to inherit the title and riches of the Earl of Highhurst. She says she\u2019s fond of Monty, but especially warms to the thought of riches, something that Monty\u2019s rival Lionel Holland can provide her.

Monty sets out to dispatch his eccentric, quirky relatives one by one. Along the way, though, he meets his attractive cousin Phoebe, and the two are attracted to each other. As Monty gets closer to his goal, Sibella grows fonder of him, even though she\u2019s already married Lionel. Monty loves Sibella, but he\u2019s attached as well to Phoebe. What\u2019s a gentleman killer to do?

Highlights: Based on an early 19th century novel by Roy Horniman titled Israel Rank: The Autobiography of a Criminal, A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder is a light-hearted, decidedly British romp that belies its ghastly moniker. The touring company now on stage at The Fox Theatre delivers plenty of laughs as well as a pleasing number of tunes to keep an audience regaled with the grisly tales of the bizarre D\u2019Ysquiths et al.

Other Info: The Fox has selected a witty work to open its 2016-17 series in amusing fashion. A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder won four Tony Awards in 2014, including Best Musical, Best Book of a Musical, Best Costume Design and Best Direction.

Why not? The clever book penned by Robert L. Freedman, who also wrote the lyrics along with composer Steven Lutvak, is reminiscent of a royal lineage itself, that of the Monty Python troupe. In fact, one can envision original Python member Terry Jones essaying the sundry and wacky D\u2019Ysquith characters so amusingly portrayed (mostly) by John Rapson in typical Python style.

To carry the analogy a bit further, Python regulars Michael Palin or Eric Idle a generation or two ago could have carried off the role of the earnest Monty Navarro, played here winningly by Kevin Massey. The latter\u2019s reactions to the quirky D\u2019Ysquiths, as well as his romantic attempts with Sibella and Phoebe, seem directly from the inspired comedy of the Python troupe.

It\u2019s a jolly good romp along the way, due in no small part to the bright and brisk direction of Darko Tresnjak (love that name), who also guided the original Broadway production. Tresnjak incorporates the inspired projection design of Aaron Rhyne, which even includes a fall from a church steeple that pays homage to Alfred Hitchcock\u2019s classic film, Vertigo.

Alexander Dodge\u2019s winsome scenic design features talking portraits in a stately D\u2019Ysquith mansion that disdain the \u2018interloper\u2019 Navarro, while Philip Rosenberg\u2019s elegant lighting highlights several amusing scenes, including a deadly bee attack on good ol\u2019 Henry D\u2019Ysquith. Linda Cho\u2019s patrician costume design of the haughty D\u2019Ysquiths and the regal Sibella deservedly won a 2014 Tony Award.

Rapson is a busy chap as he dons the wardrobes of the myriad, daffy D\u2019Ysquiths, and in true Python form he\u2019s even in poor taste in his portrayal of the Reverend Lord Ezekial D\u2019Ysquith, albeit also in exaggerated humorous form as the bodybuilding zealot Major Lord Bartholomew D\u2019Ysquith. In traditional English hall comedy form, he\u2019s a hoot in drag as Lady Hyacinth D\u2019Ysquith as well.

Massey is jolly good as the sincere if treacherous Monty Navarro, especially in comic interludes with the statuesque Kristen Beth Williams as the avaricious Sibella and Adrienne Eller as the beautiful and elegant Phoebe. Both women excel at their musical interludes, too, even if the pleasant numbers aren\u2019t especially memorable or groundbreaking.

Mary vanArsdel is delightful as the intriguing Miss Shingle and Ben Roseberry has a nice turn as the inquisitive Chief Inspector Pinckney of Scotland Yard. Kristen Mengelkoch has a grand time as the imperious Lady Eugenia, whose disgust for her oafish husband Lord Adalbert D\u2019Ysquith is reciprocated by his disdain for her.

Peggy Hickey\u2019s choreography adds to the charm of the presentation, as does Lawrence Goldberg\u2019s musical direction of the mostly local orchestra.

If you consider yourself a card-carrying member of the Monty Python fan club, A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder could be one of the highlights of your year. Take a \u2018silly walk\u2019 down the aisles of The Fox and enjoy it.

Musical: A Gentleman\u2019s Guide to Love and Murder

Group: Touring Company

Venue: Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand

Dates: Through September 25

Tickets: From $20 to $80; contact 534-1111 or metrotix.com

Rating: A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Joan Marcus

"}, {"id":"131e43c2-7489-597d-91d0-3f75665abcd0","type":"article","starttime":"1473958800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-15T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473959645","priority":45,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Kelley Walker Transforms CAM","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_131e43c2-7489-597d-91d0-3f75665abcd0.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/kelley-walker-transforms-cam/article_131e43c2-7489-597d-91d0-3f75665abcd0.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/kelley-walker-transforms-cam/article_131e43c2-7489-597d-91d0-3f75665abcd0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"New Yorker Kelley Walker transforms the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis \u2013 inside and out.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["kelley walker","direct drive","contemporary art museum","cam"],"internalKeywords":["#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"944bcfa0-550d-52c4-b9d8-f4bbe7f367a2","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"324","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/44/944bcfa0-550d-52c4-b9d8-f4bbe7f367a2/57dac3aa14c88.image.jpg?resize=760%2C324"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"54","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/44/944bcfa0-550d-52c4-b9d8-f4bbe7f367a2/57dac3aa14c88.image.jpg?crop=933%2C506%2C2%2C2&resize=100%2C54&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"163","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/44/944bcfa0-550d-52c4-b9d8-f4bbe7f367a2/57dac3aa14c88.image.jpg?crop=933%2C506%2C2%2C2&resize=300%2C163&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"555","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/9/44/944bcfa0-550d-52c4-b9d8-f4bbe7f367a2/57dac3aa14c88.image.jpg?crop=933%2C506%2C2%2C2"}}},{"id":"db41f423-7126-5283-a60b-6647b53a8ab8","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"605","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b4/db41f423-7126-5283-a60b-6647b53a8ab8/57dac3a934cf2.image.jpg?resize=605%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"126","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b4/db41f423-7126-5283-a60b-6647b53a8ab8/57dac3a934cf2.image.jpg?resize=100%2C126"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"377","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b4/db41f423-7126-5283-a60b-6647b53a8ab8/57dac3a934cf2.image.jpg?resize=300%2C377"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1287","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/b4/db41f423-7126-5283-a60b-6647b53a8ab8/57dac3a934cf2.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1287"}}},{"id":"f846ef38-1f8d-505c-bfe1-1bb9f83cbd60","description":"","byline":"Photo by Ellen Page Wilson","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"565","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/84/f846ef38-1f8d-505c-bfe1-1bb9f83cbd60/57dac3a9af284.image.jpg?resize=565%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"135","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/84/f846ef38-1f8d-505c-bfe1-1bb9f83cbd60/57dac3a9af284.image.jpg?resize=100%2C135"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"404","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/84/f846ef38-1f8d-505c-bfe1-1bb9f83cbd60/57dac3a9af284.image.jpg?resize=300%2C404"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1378","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/84/f846ef38-1f8d-505c-bfe1-1bb9f83cbd60/57dac3a9af284.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1378"}}},{"id":"34d6f2c7-cce4-5fa8-8819-cfb65ec08a34","description":"","byline":"Photo by Meredyth Sparks","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"547","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/4d/34d6f2c7-cce4-5fa8-8819-cfb65ec08a34/57dac3aa3c3ce.image.jpg?crop=575%2C799%2C221%2C1&resize=547%2C760&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"139","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/4d/34d6f2c7-cce4-5fa8-8819-cfb65ec08a34/57dac3aa3c3ce.image.jpg?crop=575%2C799%2C221%2C1&resize=100%2C139&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"417","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/4d/34d6f2c7-cce4-5fa8-8819-cfb65ec08a34/57dac3aa3c3ce.image.jpg?crop=575%2C799%2C221%2C1&resize=300%2C417&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1423","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/4d/34d6f2c7-cce4-5fa8-8819-cfb65ec08a34/57dac3aa3c3ce.image.jpg?crop=575%2C799%2C221%2C1"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"131e43c2-7489-597d-91d0-3f75665abcd0","body":"
\"Kelley
Kelley Walker, Untitled, 2013. KW-427-PCG (a).jpg

Although fine art and dental hygiene might strike some as strange bedfellows, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (CAM) will greet visitors with just such a conceptual mattress/box-spring juxtaposition starting today.

More specifically, the museum will present \u201cKelley Walker: Direct Drive,\u201d the first solo American museum exhibition by that multidisciplinary New York artist, through Dec. 31.

In context, the modifier museum bears noting. Two years ago, New York City\u2019s Paula Cooper Gallery also hosted a solo exhibition of Walker\u2019s work, accompanied by a 116-page color monograph with an essay by esteemed art historian Robert Hobbs.

Be that as it may, the exhibition here has been gestating for quite some time, says Jeffrey Uslip, CAM\u2019s chief curator and deputy director for exhibitions and programs.

\"Kelley
Kelley Walker, Black Starr Press. KW-97.A-PTG.jpg

\u201cI chose to work with Kelley Walker three years ago when I assumed the chief curatorship at CAM,\u201d Uslip relates. \u201cWe have been working on this show for the past three years.\u201d He adds that Walker will attend both today\u2019s opening and an \u201cartist talk\u201d tomorrow.

Like most fine art, of course, Walker\u2019s work might not suit every viewer\u2019s taste, especially inasmuch as that work, digitally if not actually, incorporates substances as unlikely as smeared toothpaste. Two pieces from earlier in the millennium, for example, reportedly bear the titles Aquafresh plus Crest with whitener and Aquafresh plus Crest with tartar control.

Walker, self-evidently, is operating at a rarefied conceptual level; in places, in discussing his own work, he sounds like Greil Marcus in Lipstick Traces, that acclaimed polymath\u2019s scarily magisterial 1989 \u201cSecret History of the 20th Century,\u201d to quote the tome\u2019s subtitle.

\u201cI was intrigued with how a work changes from being marketed as culturally relevant to becoming a potentially historical object and also a commodity,\u201d Hobbs, in a 2007 encomium, quotes Walker as saying.

Elsewhere in the same place, the art historian also quotes the artist thus: \u201cI wanted zero, but I wanted the negative and positive to remain on both sides of zero. There was no way to begin with zero because whatever I would start with, it would have a history.\u201d

In any event, Uslip himself sounds enthusiastic about the Walker exhibition\u2019s sheer, exuberant scale, which he characterizes as \u201ccarefully articulated to create site-responsive and site-specific encounters.\u201d

\"Kelley
Kelley Walker, Bose, 2007. KW-236-SC.jpg

For readers cursed with museum-speak nearsitedness, Uslip expounds on that comment about an exhibition that effectively and playfully redefines the phrase outsider art.

\u201cKelley\u2019s exhibition is a museumwide exhibition \u2013 the fa\u00e7ade and courtyard are very important exhibition spaces for the museum,\u201d he says. \u201cOur director, Lisa Melandri, began our fa\u00e7ade project titled \u2018Street Views\u2019 in 2013, which engages the public in ways that are both inclusive and expansive.\u201d

The Walker exhibition, Uslip adds, will generate tandem publications.

\u201cThe first, titled Kelley Walker: Black Star Press, will include a text by [influential New Yorker writer/theater critic] Hilton Als and a postscript written by me,\u201d he says. \u201cThis publication focuses on issues of race and identity.\u201d

The second, he continues, will bear the title Kelley Walker: Direct Drive, will encompass the whole exhibition and will include contributions by Uslip himself, Als again, Christophe Cherix (chief curator of drawings and prints at the Big Apple\u2019s Museum of Modern Art) and two other writers.

\u201cThe first publication will be ready for the opening,\u201d Uslip says. \u201cThe second publication will come out in December and feature installation images from the exhibition.\u201d

\"KelleyWalker-Photo_MeredythSparks.jpeg\"
KelleyWalker-Photo_MeredythSparks.jpeg

Born in 1969 in urban west-central Georgia, Walker earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 1995 and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Arizona in 1998. For some time now, he has enjoyed a reputation as a critics\u2019 darling.

A 2008 Interview magazine piece on him, for instance, opened by opining, \u201cPerhaps no artist deals so strategically and systematically with pop culture as Kelley Walker.\u201d (The same piece subsequently referred to \u201cthe point where pop is kitsch,\u201d a rather fine distinction in the current era.)

Like an electromagnet and iron shavings, Walker\u2019s work \u2013 variously dubbed \u201cappropriation art,\u201d \u201cneo-appropriationist\u201d and \u201csecondary appropriation\u201d \u2013 has inspired regular references to artistic past masters of controversy: Marcel Duchamp, France\u2019s mack daddy of Dada delirium; Jackson Pollock, America\u2019s splashy purveyor of \u201caction paintings\u201d; and almost necessarily, Andy Warhol, Mr. \u201c15 Minutes of Fame.\u201d

It also has inspired mentions of Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto, and French pass-the-aspirin philosophers Roland Barthes and Guy Debord.

Here, in addition to many extant works from prior exhibitions \u2013 among them \u201cBlack Star Press,\u201d \u201cBricks,\u201d \u201cDisasters,\u201d \u201cRecycling,\u201d \u201cschema\u201d and \u201cVolkswagen Bug\u201d \u2013 Walker will be spotlighting various new pieces of art, says Uslip.

Regarding those new pieces, he previews a passage from his postscript to Kelley Walker: Black Star Press: \u201cFor \u2018Direct Drive,\u2019 Walker presents new works made specifically for CAM, including a \u2018mimic wall\u2019 sculpture \u2013 an exact replica of a [CAM] wall \u2013 that manifests in the physical world the digital concept of copying and pasting, alongside new series of sculptures comprising MacBook Pros that have been laser-cut, folded and turned inside-out \u2026 \u201d

The MacBook component, he notes in passing, loosely explains what inspired the second half of the new exhibition\u2019s title: \u201c\u2018Direct Drive\u2019 refers to the streamlined motors that are used in hard drives and turntables.\u201d

For the St. Louis exhibition, Walker also will revisit a signally puckish piece from a 2006 Brussels gallery installation: a functional chocolate disco ball. Regarding that ball, though, potential attendees oughtn\u2019t fret about packing parasols. \u201cThe chocolate is stable,\u201d Uslip dryly notes. \u201cIt will not melt or drip.\u201d

Walker has shanghaied chocolate as an artistic medium otherwise, in a caveat lector fashion for residents of a metropolitan area repeatedly rocked by social unrest since 2014.

That is, his \u201cBlack Star Press\u201d works from a 2006 Memphis exhibition appropriate photographic images of the Birmingham, Alabama, race riots of 1963, atop which Walker has artfully squeegeed melted chocolate. Regarding those intriguing but potentially controversial works, Uslip succinctly replies, \u201cThe \u2018Black Star Press\u2019 series is prominently featured in the [local] exhibition.\u201d

3750 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 314-535-4660, camstl.org

"}, {"id":"d56c27e4-e7f3-53ce-9188-ba4bf885419b","type":"article","starttime":"1473958800","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-15T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473959525","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Mellow Mushroom","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_d56c27e4-e7f3-53ce-9188-ba4bf885419b.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-mellow-mushroom/article_d56c27e4-e7f3-53ce-9188-ba4bf885419b.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-mellow-mushroom/article_d56c27e4-e7f3-53ce-9188-ba4bf885419b.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mabel Suen","prologue":"Vacationers might recognize Mellow Mushroom from hot spots across the nation.\u00a0","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"7ce13c04-25d9-5581-8cda-bb571e640eb7","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ce/7ce13c04-25d9-5581-8cda-bb571e640eb7/57d05bbde0c50.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ce/7ce13c04-25d9-5581-8cda-bb571e640eb7/57d05bbde0c50.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ce/7ce13c04-25d9-5581-8cda-bb571e640eb7/57d05bbde0c50.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/ce/7ce13c04-25d9-5581-8cda-bb571e640eb7/57d05bbde0c50.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C683"}}},{"id":"6f531d7c-6a6e-5320-bbd2-fe8835016502","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f531d7c-6a6e-5320-bbd2-fe8835016502/57dac23c96f73.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f531d7c-6a6e-5320-bbd2-fe8835016502/57dac23c96f73.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f531d7c-6a6e-5320-bbd2-fe8835016502/57dac23c96f73.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/f5/6f531d7c-6a6e-5320-bbd2-fe8835016502/57dac23c96f73.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"35fc2808-b7ef-5122-addb-7bd3af1d4bf2","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"497","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/5f/35fc2808-b7ef-5122-addb-7bd3af1d4bf2/57dac23cd4a2a.image.jpg?resize=760%2C497"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/5f/35fc2808-b7ef-5122-addb-7bd3af1d4bf2/57dac23cd4a2a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"196","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/5f/35fc2808-b7ef-5122-addb-7bd3af1d4bf2/57dac23cd4a2a.image.jpg?resize=300%2C196"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"670","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/5f/35fc2808-b7ef-5122-addb-7bd3af1d4bf2/57dac23cd4a2a.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"b8e923ce-1798-57f4-98ba-8d768c1b19fd","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8e/b8e923ce-1798-57f4-98ba-8d768c1b19fd/57dac23d0c377.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8e/b8e923ce-1798-57f4-98ba-8d768c1b19fd/57dac23d0c377.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8e/b8e923ce-1798-57f4-98ba-8d768c1b19fd/57dac23d0c377.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8e/b8e923ce-1798-57f4-98ba-8d768c1b19fd/57dac23d0c377.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":9,"commentID":"d56c27e4-e7f3-53ce-9188-ba4bf885419b","body":"
\"Mellow
Mellow Mushroom

Vacationers might recognize Mellow Mushroom from hot spots across the nation. The hippie-inspired concept, founded in Atlanta circa 1974, currently has more than 200 locations across the country. In July, the first Mellow Mushroom franchise in Missouri debuted in Sunset Hills.

\u201cWe specialize in pizza. Something about our dough is absolutely amazing. People love it and crave it,\u201d says general manager Chris Deatherage. \u201cWe also make calzones, hamburgers, sandwiches and salads. We\u2019re huge on gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan offerings \u2013 there\u2019s a little bit of everything.\u201d

The full-service restaurant fills a large space previously occupied by Growler\u2019s Pub. According to Deatherage, no two Mellow Mushrooms are identical. SPACE Architecture + Design incorporated elements of the brand\u2019s retro identity with eclectic contemporary elements.

Altogether, the restaurant accommodates seating for approximately 200 guests. In the dining room, wavy ceiling d\u00e9cor meshes with colorful tiles and booths, hanging globular lights, funky statues and paintings by local artist Phil Jarvis (profiled in the June 17 LN). The sizable patio features a full bar, bocce ball and plenty of seating, including tables locally crafted by Mwanzi Co. (profiled in the April 29 LN).

\u201cIt\u2019s a sit-down place with a lot of local flair and all fresh ingredients,\u201d Deatherage says. \u201cAll of our dough is hand-tossed when you order it. It\u2019s not as thick as Chicago-style but not thin crust by any means. It\u2019s a little bit thicker with cornmeal and some other things to make it moist and sweet.\u201d

According to its website, Mellow Mushroom\u2019s signature dough features high-protein, unbleached wheat flour, Appalachian spring water and no refined white sugar. Its pizza sauce is made with vine-ripened tomatoes and a proprietary blend of herbs and spices free of additives and preservatives.

Popular specialty pies include the Mighty Meaty, which features red sauce topped with mozzarella, pepperoni, sausage, ground beef, ham and Applewood-smoked bacon. Another highlight, the Magical Mystery Tour, features a pesto base with button and portobellos, feta and mozzarella, spinach and light jalape\u00f1os on a pesto-baked crust.

The local menu mostly mirrors that of the chain\u2019s other locations. However, after 90 days in business, the franchise can develop a local-only food menu with up to five unique specialties \u2013 to be decided. The drink menu features a full bar with 32 draft beers and more than 30 wines by the glass.

MO Mellow LLC intends to establish additional locations of the chain in the greater St. Louis area. For now, guests can stop in to the Sunset Hills location for a taste of stone-baked classic Southern pizza.\u00a0

3811 S. Lindbergh Blvd., Sunset Hills, 314-473-1135, mellowmushroom.com/store/st-louis

\"Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_02.jpg\"
Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_02.jpg
\"Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_06.jpg\"
Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_06.jpg
\"Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_08.jpg\"
Feast_MellowMushroom_20160810_ByMabelSuen_08.jpg
"}, {"id":"265d78c8-7b96-11e6-a3d1-634243fef897","type":"article","starttime":"1473979500","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-15T17:45:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473980078","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Stages' Success with 'Always...Patsy Cline' Leads to New Management and Season for Playhouse at Westport Plaza","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_265d78c8-7b96-11e6-a3d1-634243fef897.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/stages-success-with-always-patsy-cline-leads-to-new-management/article_265d78c8-7b96-11e6-a3d1-634243fef897.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/stages-success-with-always-patsy-cline-leads-to-new-management/article_265d78c8-7b96-11e6-a3d1-634243fef897.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":3,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"A few seasons back, Stages St. Louis mounted a production of Always\u2026Patsy Cline at its regular performance space, the Robert Reim Theatre at the Kirkwood Community Center. An intimate show with two performers and a small band, it was a smash hit, a critical and box-office success that regularly filled the 400 or so seats at the Reim.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["stages st. louis","playhouse at westport plaza","westport plaza","jack lane","paul emery","emery entertainment","lodging hospital management","lhm","theater"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"070f69c8-7b95-11e6-8cce-9f69acf46d0b","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"640","height":"480","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/70/070f69c8-7b95-11e6-8cce-9f69acf46d0b/57db22bc04fa1.image.jpg?resize=640%2C480"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"75","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/70/070f69c8-7b95-11e6-8cce-9f69acf46d0b/57db22bc04fa1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C75"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"225","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/70/070f69c8-7b95-11e6-8cce-9f69acf46d0b/57db22bc04fa1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C225"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"768","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/70/070f69c8-7b95-11e6-8cce-9f69acf46d0b/57db22bc04fa1.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"1c279074-7b95-11e6-96a3-cf2d5cbd33f2","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"428","height":"640","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/c2/1c279074-7b95-11e6-96a3-cf2d5cbd33f2/57db22df64358.image.jpg?resize=428%2C640"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/c2/1c279074-7b95-11e6-96a3-cf2d5cbd33f2/57db22df64358.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"449","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/c2/1c279074-7b95-11e6-96a3-cf2d5cbd33f2/57db22df64358.image.jpg?resize=300%2C449"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1531","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/c2/1c279074-7b95-11e6-96a3-cf2d5cbd33f2/57db22df64358.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"2d52b3ec-7b95-11e6-955f-a3d2eab6c59e","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"516","height":"640","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d5/2d52b3ec-7b95-11e6-955f-a3d2eab6c59e/57db22fc349db.image.jpg?resize=516%2C640"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"124","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d5/2d52b3ec-7b95-11e6-955f-a3d2eab6c59e/57db22fc349db.image.jpg?resize=100%2C124"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"372","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d5/2d52b3ec-7b95-11e6-955f-a3d2eab6c59e/57db22fc349db.image.jpg?resize=300%2C372"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1270","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/d5/2d52b3ec-7b95-11e6-955f-a3d2eab6c59e/57db22fc349db.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"265d78c8-7b96-11e6-a3d1-634243fef897","body":"

A few seasons back, Stages St. Louis mounted a production of Always\u2026Patsy Cline at its regular performance space, the Robert Reim Theatre at the Kirkwood Community Center. An intimate show with two performers and a small band, it was a smash hit, a critical and box-office success that regularly filled the 400 or so seats at the Reim.

When the show concluded its run, executive producer Jack Lane observed that Patsy could have run all summer at the Reim if there had been dates available. Lane began looking for other venues where Always\u2026Patsy Cline could return to meet the demand for tickets in St. Louis.

\u201cI fell in love with the Playhouse at Westport (Plaza) since Menopause the Musical played there (years ago),\u201d said Lane in a recent phone interview. \u201cI liked the space. I love bigger theaters, but there\u2019s something about the intimacy and interaction of a house with 200 seats or less.\u201d

\u201cWhen Patsy was such a hit, we said we have to move it some place,\u201d added Lane. \u201cWe renovated Westport for Always\u2026Patsy Cline, and those six months with Patsy were among my happiest at Stages.\u201d

Lane was smitten not only by the box-office bonanza for Patsy, which set a record for number of productions of a Stages show, but also by the atmosphere at Westport Plaza. \u201cI loved Patsy at the Playhouse,\u201d he recalls, \u201cI also got to know the restaurant owners and others in the Westport family. I said that when Patsy closes this is an amazing space and we have to do something with it.\u201d

Stages has used the Playhouse at Westport Plaza the last two years for its annual children\u2019s production, The Aristocats in 2015 and Alice in Wonderland this summer. While all of its presentations at the Playhouse have been successful, Lane noted that \u201cStages doesn\u2019t have the time, budget or staff to produce at Westport.\u201d

Enter Paul Emery, producer for St. Louis-based Emery Entertainment. \u201cI met Paul Emery, who owns the rights to (the comedy) Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus,\u201d said Lane. \u201cWe helped him with our mailing list (when Emery produced the show at the Playhouse earlier this year), and he did really well.\u201d

It was time for Lane and Emery to advance to the next step to realize Lane\u2019s vision for the Playhouse. \u201cI said that I have a dream to book Off-Broadway products that have no place to be done in St. Louis,\u201d said Lane, who has won Tony Awards the last two years as a co-producer for Fun Home and The Humans. \u201cI sent Paul a list of shows, including Dixie, which I saw in New York and is one of the funniest shows around. It\u2019s played a number of major cities in the last few years.

\u201cDixie had to have a run of three weeks,\u201d added Lane. \u201cIt\u2019s about this sassy Southern broad who doesn\u2019t realize that Tupperware is for the kitchen and not the bedroom. But where are you going to put it in St. Louis except the Playhouse at Westport Plaza? Defending the Caveman played here for six months about eight years ago.\u201d

The 2016-17 season opens September 30 with the return of Defending the Caveman, the longest-running solo play in Broadway history, starring Las Vegas entertainer Kevin Burke. Caveman runs through October 23, followed by the parody, Forbidden Broadway, which will be performed November 3 through 13. The Off-Broadway hit comedy, Dixie\u2019s Tupperware Party, then takes the stage from November 29 through December 18, followed by the one-man show, The Book of Moron, from December 27 through January 1.

Emery says that \u201cThe Playhouse at Westport Plaza is the perfect venue to fill a niche for a variety of Broadway and Off-Broadway entertainment that would otherwise not find its way to the St. Louis area. Programming will be offered at affordable ticket pricing so that anyone can have dinner at one of the many restaurants in the area as well as see a great show.\u201d

The current configuration for the Playhouse at Westport Plaza \u201copened as a theater space about 12 years ago,\u201d noted Lane. \u201cThis new (effort) is not a Stages venture. This is me and Paul. It is our hope to make Westport Plaza a new and embracive destination for great theatrical experiences.\u201d

Lane and Emery Entertainment are working with Lodging Hospitality Management (LHM), the largest privately held hotel company in the St. Louis region that includes 17 hotel properties, eight restaurants and two commercial properties.

While Lane and Emery Entertainment look for someone or some corporation to name the theater, Lane says that the rendering of a new fa\u00e7ade for the Playhouse is complete and \u201call of our equipment is there.\u201d

Ticket prices for shows in the 2016-17 season will be $50 to $60, with some 50 percent discounts available. Tickets can be purchased at www.metrotix.com, by calling 314-534-1111 or at the box office one hour prior to show time.

Photos courtesy of Playhouse at Westport Plaza

"}, {"id":"605e0dbc-79f7-11e6-b8b3-ef2707b1f27c","type":"article","starttime":"1473801360","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-13T16:16:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473889320","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"'Miss Julie, Clarissa and John' Is a Sobering Tale of Then and Now at The Black Rep: Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_605e0dbc-79f7-11e6-b8b3-ef2707b1f27c.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/miss-julie-clarissa-and-john-is-a-sobering-tale-of/article_605e0dbc-79f7-11e6-b8b3-ef2707b1f27c.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/miss-julie-clarissa-and-john-is-a-sobering-tale-of/article_605e0dbc-79f7-11e6-b8b3-ef2707b1f27c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":2,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: It\u2019s been 23 years since the end of the Civil War, but former slave John still works on the Hodge tobacco plantation in Virginia. These days, he has specifically assigned tasks, to the point where he can refuse a request from the owner\u2019s daughter if it isn\u2019t within his realm of responsibility.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["the black rep","august strindberg","miss julie","miss julie, clarissa and john","edison theatre","washington university","mark clayton southers","theater","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"c85cb95a-7ac3-11e6-b602-d35a7604ea7a","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"650","height":"648","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/85/c85cb95a-7ac3-11e6-b602-d35a7604ea7a/57d9c3ae03472.image.jpg?resize=650%2C648"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/85/c85cb95a-7ac3-11e6-b602-d35a7604ea7a/57d9c3ae03472.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"299","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/85/c85cb95a-7ac3-11e6-b602-d35a7604ea7a/57d9c3ae03472.image.jpg?resize=300%2C299"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1021","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/85/c85cb95a-7ac3-11e6-b602-d35a7604ea7a/57d9c3ae03472.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"d2e2112c-7ac3-11e6-94cc-6395623d984f","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/2e/d2e2112c-7ac3-11e6-94cc-6395623d984f/57d9c3bfa2e53.image.jpg?resize=760%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"100","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/2e/d2e2112c-7ac3-11e6-94cc-6395623d984f/57d9c3bfa2e53.image.jpg?resize=100%2C100"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"300","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/2e/d2e2112c-7ac3-11e6-94cc-6395623d984f/57d9c3bfa2e53.image.jpg?resize=300%2C300"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1024","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/2e/d2e2112c-7ac3-11e6-94cc-6395623d984f/57d9c3bfa2e53.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1024"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"605e0dbc-79f7-11e6-b8b3-ef2707b1f27c","body":"

Story: It\u2019s been 23 years since the end of the Civil War, but former slave John still works on the Hodge tobacco plantation in Virginia. These days, he has specifically assigned tasks, to the point where he can refuse a request from the owner\u2019s daughter if it isn\u2019t within his realm of responsibility.

That daughter, Miss Julie, spends much of her idle days hanging around the kitchen where John prepares meals for Mr. Hodge. John is unmarried but has been with a younger domestic servant, Clarissa, for many years. They have a good relationship and enjoy each other\u2019s company, although Clarissa is annoyed by the frequent visits of Miss Julie, who obviously finds John attractive.

Clarissa long has suspected that Mr. Hodge is also her own father, but since her mother disappeared while supposedly taken from the plantation years ago and has never returned, she has no way of knowing for certain.

As John and Clarissa prepare for the countryside\u2019s annual picnic, Miss Julie insists that John dance with her at the event, despite the controversy that might erupt because of a white woman standing so near a black man. John reluctantly agrees, but this day will soon have severe ramifications that impact all three in the tiny world they call home.

Highlights: The Black Rep is celebrating its 40th anniversary season in 2016-17, and has opened its year with a sizzling, affecting and pinpoint interpretation of a drama by Mark Clayton Southers inspired by 19th century playwright August Strindberg\u2019s ground-breaking, naturalistic drama Miss Julie.

Other Info: Southers transfer the locale of Strindberg\u2019s famous story from Sweden in 1888 to Virginia in the same year. His drama has problematic mathematical elements, such as when John tells Clarissa that \u201cyou were never a slave.\u201d Yet, Clarissa talks about her first love, a young man who died fighting in the Civil War.

Despite lapses in logic such as that, Miss Julie, Clarissa and John packs a powerful emotional wallop. Director Andrea Frye coaxes superb portrayals of the three characters from her trio of performers, all of whom shine in their roles. Frye also keeps the story moving steadily despite long, languid sections of prolonged conversations, especially with Miss Julie.

Jim Burwinkel\u2019s scenic design is a handsome, rustic structure that represents a Restoration-era \u201ckitchen house\u201d that is the sole setting for the play. Three doors lead to the set, including one from the bedroom of John and Clarissa, one going to Mr. Hodge\u2019s mansion and a third opening into the outdoors. Lighting designer Kathy Perkins illuminates both the kitchen setting and the outdoors area beyond the central door, showing openings in the house construction that are more symbolic than actual.

Costume designer Jennifer (J.C.) Krajicek dresses the characters in clothes that represent their respective social standing, and Jenny Smith provides props that underscore the setting, such as a bell that is rung whenever Mr. Hodge requires attention. Particularly interesting is Robin Weatherall\u2019s sound design, which incorporates both classical and bluegrass melodies.

Laurie McConnell\u2019s Miss Julie is akin to another Southern belle, Blanche DuBois from Tennessee Williams\u2019 classic drama, A Streetcar Named Desire. While not as neurotic as Blanche, Miss Julie is stifled and suffocated living in the middle of nowhere. She knows that she has let men (her father, her maybe fianc\u00e9) dictate how and where she should reside and what she should be.

Miss Julie\u2019s bigotry is more empty-headed than consciously mean-spirited, although she can quickly descend into the latter category when justifying her place in the class structure of the South. McConnell conveys all of Miss Julie\u2019s negative traits as convincingly as she shows the woman\u2019s desperate overtures for love and sexual fulfillment with John. Her climactic scene is especially stunning.

Eric J. Conners is solid throughout as John. His is the character with the most innate understanding of the world and his particular situation. He has dreams, too, focusing on his goal of meeting Pope Leo on the latter\u2019s visit to New Orleans from Vatican City, to ask him a pointed question.

Conners is wonderful demonstrating John\u2019s intelligence and perception as well as his practical approach to his own life and his attempts to explain to Clarissa what their best options are. It\u2019s an unflagging and well-etched portrayal.

Alicia Reve Like is impressivley persuasive in her depiction of Clarissa. While she understands that Miss Julie holds all the power cards, Clarissa isn\u2019t afraid to challenge the woman she considers to be her half-sister, leading to some heightened dramatic scenes between the two characters. Like makes Clarissa a considerable force in her own right.

Southers\u2019 sobering tale succeeds in laying out the options each character has had and why they have ended up where they are. Under Frye\u2019s astute direction, The Black Rep\u2019s presentation of Miss Julie, Clarissa and John asks questions relevant not only at the time of the drama\u2019s setting but in 21st century America as well.

Play: Miss Julie, Clarissa and John

Company: The Black Rep

Venue: Edison Theatre, 6445 Forsyth Blvd. at Washington University

Dates: September 15, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 25

Tickets: $15-$40; contact 534-3810 or www.theblackrep.org

Rating: A 4.5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photo and artwork courtesy of The Black Rep

"}, {"id":"84706698-79f5-11e6-9bbd-ff6a7f8d511a","type":"article","starttime":"1473800580","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-13T16:03:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473954400","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Follies","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_84706698-79f5-11e6-9bbd-ff6a7f8d511a.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-follies/article_84706698-79f5-11e6-9bbd-ff6a7f8d511a.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-follies/article_84706698-79f5-11e6-9bbd-ff6a7f8d511a.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":10,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"Follies\u00a0is a theatrical spectacle, immense in its scope and intimidating for any troupe attempting its execution.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["the rep","repertory theatre of st. louis","follies","stephen sondheim","steve woolf","theater","musical","review","loretto-hilton center"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"25e25c8a-79f5-11e6-887a-77e7fe8dc03a","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/5e/25e25c8a-79f5-11e6-887a-77e7fe8dc03a/57d8690118e36.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/5e/25e25c8a-79f5-11e6-887a-77e7fe8dc03a/57d8690118e36.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/5e/25e25c8a-79f5-11e6-887a-77e7fe8dc03a/57d8690118e36.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/5e/25e25c8a-79f5-11e6-887a-77e7fe8dc03a/57d8690118e36.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"3df4bdd6-79f5-11e6-94cc-8770aa30d68a","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/df/3df4bdd6-79f5-11e6-94cc-8770aa30d68a/57d86929773fb.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/df/3df4bdd6-79f5-11e6-94cc-8770aa30d68a/57d86929773fb.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/df/3df4bdd6-79f5-11e6-94cc-8770aa30d68a/57d86929773fb.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/3/df/3df4bdd6-79f5-11e6-94cc-8770aa30d68a/57d86929773fb.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"50b808ce-79f5-11e6-b1a2-67428b78398e","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0b/50b808ce-79f5-11e6-b1a2-67428b78398e/57d86948ec244.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0b/50b808ce-79f5-11e6-b1a2-67428b78398e/57d86948ec244.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0b/50b808ce-79f5-11e6-b1a2-67428b78398e/57d86948ec244.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/0b/50b808ce-79f5-11e6-b1a2-67428b78398e/57d86948ec244.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"600020c8-79f5-11e6-acb9-ab02480305f1","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/600020c8-79f5-11e6-acb9-ab02480305f1/57d8696293572.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/600020c8-79f5-11e6-acb9-ab02480305f1/57d8696293572.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/600020c8-79f5-11e6-acb9-ab02480305f1/57d8696293572.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/00/600020c8-79f5-11e6-acb9-ab02480305f1/57d8696293572.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"ce8e925a-79f4-11e6-ac2c-bb140d857add","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e8/ce8e925a-79f4-11e6-ac2c-bb140d857add/57d8686e901f9.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e8/ce8e925a-79f4-11e6-ac2c-bb140d857add/57d8686e901f9.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e8/ce8e925a-79f4-11e6-ac2c-bb140d857add/57d8686e901f9.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/e8/ce8e925a-79f4-11e6-ac2c-bb140d857add/57d8686e901f9.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"e27842e8-79f4-11e6-8c64-df0a56bc0a69","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/27/e27842e8-79f4-11e6-8c64-df0a56bc0a69/57d8688ff3eca.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/27/e27842e8-79f4-11e6-8c64-df0a56bc0a69/57d8688ff3eca.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/27/e27842e8-79f4-11e6-8c64-df0a56bc0a69/57d8688ff3eca.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/27/e27842e8-79f4-11e6-8c64-df0a56bc0a69/57d8688ff3eca.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"fea03d5e-79f4-11e6-aeea-8b6b5a768349","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/ea/fea03d5e-79f4-11e6-aeea-8b6b5a768349/57d868bf3acf3.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/ea/fea03d5e-79f4-11e6-aeea-8b6b5a768349/57d868bf3acf3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/ea/fea03d5e-79f4-11e6-aeea-8b6b5a768349/57d868bf3acf3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/ea/fea03d5e-79f4-11e6-aeea-8b6b5a768349/57d868bf3acf3.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"ab18c4b2-79f4-11e6-8c33-5f95fef72e36","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b1/ab18c4b2-79f4-11e6-8c33-5f95fef72e36/57d8683317ce1.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b1/ab18c4b2-79f4-11e6-8c33-5f95fef72e36/57d8683317ce1.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b1/ab18c4b2-79f4-11e6-8c33-5f95fef72e36/57d8683317ce1.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/b1/ab18c4b2-79f4-11e6-8c33-5f95fef72e36/57d8683317ce1.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"bc334ce0-79f4-11e6-9ea9-27a378fae2f6","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c3/bc334ce0-79f4-11e6-9ea9-27a378fae2f6/57d8684fc1884.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c3/bc334ce0-79f4-11e6-9ea9-27a378fae2f6/57d8684fc1884.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c3/bc334ce0-79f4-11e6-9ea9-27a378fae2f6/57d8684fc1884.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/c3/bc334ce0-79f4-11e6-9ea9-27a378fae2f6/57d8684fc1884.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"135a9b7c-79f5-11e6-8502-179cf03e1784","description":"TUESDAY, SEPT. 6, 2016 - This is the Repertory Theatre is St. Louis' production of \"Follies\". \u00a9Photo by Jerry Naunheim Jr.","byline":"Jerry Naunheim Jr.","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/35/135a9b7c-79f5-11e6-8502-179cf03e1784/57d868e20321c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/35/135a9b7c-79f5-11e6-8502-179cf03e1784/57d868e20321c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/35/135a9b7c-79f5-11e6-8502-179cf03e1784/57d868e20321c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/35/135a9b7c-79f5-11e6-8502-179cf03e1784/57d868e20321c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"84706698-79f5-11e6-9bbd-ff6a7f8d511a","body":"

Story: It\u2019s been 30 years since the Weismann Follies were last performed in the once luxurious Weismann Theatre. Between the two world wars, the Weismann girls, adorned in resplendent costumes, filled the handsome venue with audiences who thrilled to see their intricate song-and-dance routines.

The Weismann closed with the arrival of World War II and has stood dormant since. Now, just before the stately but dilapidated structure is scheduled to be razed for a parking lot, one-time impresario Dimitri Weismann has invited many of his former performers to a grand finale of a party to reminisce about bygone days and say \u2018au revoir\u2019 to the era of the glitzy Weismann Follies.

Those who attend bring with them updates of their lives as well as memories of their time spent in the limelight of the Great White Way. In particular, Sally Durant Plummer and Phyllis Rogers Stone think back to what their lives were like three decades ago, when they met two ambitious young men named Buddy Plummer and Benjamin Stone.

The personal stories of those four were intertwined at one time. Sally loved Ben but married Buddy, who became a modestly successful traveling salesman. Phyllis ended up with Ben and a life in the fast line of high finance and opulence. Now, with the reunion, old romantic flames are rekindled. Playing with matches, though, is always problematic, no matter what the age.

Highlights: Steve Woolf, Augustin Family Artistic Director of The Rep, has seen Follies more times than any other Broadway production. It\u2019s been a goal of his to produce the show on The Rep\u2019s stage, and what better time than to commemorate the 50th anniversary of The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis?

Follies is a theatrical spectacle, immense in its scope and intimidating for any troupe attempting its execution. Goals are made to be pursued, though, and Woolf and The Rep have realized theirs with a sumptuous, stunning and spectacular presentation of Stephen Sondheim\u2019s multiple, Tony Award-winning masterpiece, a paean to the world of stage performance and illusion.

Other Info: Woolf points out in his Letter to Subscribers that Follies is rarely performed due to the sheer scope of its structure. The Rep\u2019s presentation, e.g., features 28 performers and a 12-piece orchestra. Obviously, a show of that dimension can strain a company\u2019s budget.

It\u2019s also difficult to perform the intricate and sophisticated music composed by Sondheim, who wrote the pensive and urbane lyrics for the show as well. Sondheim enlisted the talents of playwright James Goldman to ink the book. The original 1971 production was directed by Harold Prince and Michael Bennett, the latter contributing the show\u2019s choreography, which garnered one of the musical\u2019s seven Tony Awards.

The Rep\u2019s production is breathtaking and exquisite from both technical and performing perspectives. Director Rob Ruggiero makes optimal use of The Rep\u2019s stage to give the production impressive dimension and depth, played out on scenic designer Luke Cantarella\u2019s imposing stage within a stage. Cantarella\u2019s vision of the once opulent Weismann Theatre is realized in the handsome fa\u00e7ade up front that gives way at times to the shoddy, present-day theater indicated on a background screen.

Lighting designer John Lasiter bathes the set in rich, opulent hues, while Randy Hansen adds a winsome sound design to complement the action on stage. As for Amy Clark\u2019s costumes, she attires the entire ensemble in a lavish, elegant wardrobe that includes probably more than 100 different outfits, shrewdly matching costumes for the ladies to match the respective eras when their \u2018ghosts\u2019 appear with them on stage.

Music supervisor Brad Haak realizes Sondheim\u2019s ambitious score with a spirited, soulful interpretation of the music, with conductor Valerie Maze guiding a dozen versatile musicians through the enchanting melodies. As for the choreography, Ralph Perkins offers several grand and glorious dance numbers that accentuate Sondheim\u2019s lilting music.

The Rep\u2019s stellar cast features Christiane Noll and Emily Skinner in the primary roles of Sally and Phyllis, respectively, accompanied by Adam Heller as Buddy and Bradley Dean as Ben. Each of the quartet excels at developing their characters, including their foibles and \u2018follies,\u2019 giving them dimension as well as poignant dramatization.

They also each get to showcase their musical talents in the second act, when the Follies of their minds are realized in individual numbers that define who they are. Those pieces are witty and beautifully conceived, even if the second act of this production doesn\u2019t seem as lively as the first.

The production features not one but three show-stoppers, all in rapid succession in the first act. Zoe Vonder Haar leads the way as the unstoppable Hattie Walker in her rousing rendition of Broadway Baby. That\u2019s followed shortly thereafter by E. Faye Butler as Stella Deems in her vivacious performance of Who\u2019s That Woman? Nancy Opel then brings down the house as her character, the lusty Carlotta Campion, relates the story of her spicy life in I\u2019m Still Here.

Long-time Rep favorite Joneal Joplin is the refined and practical Weismann, Ron Himes plays Stella\u2019s easy-going husband Max Deems and Carol Skarimbas portrays the earliest Wisemann \u2018girl,\u2019 Heidi Schiller. Amra-Faye Wright is the coquettish Solange LaFitte, Dorothy Stanley and James Young are the dancers-turned-dance instructors Emily and Theodore Whitman and Robert DuSold is the former MC Roscoe.

Others doing excellent work include Kathryn Boswell and Sarah Quinn Taylor as the young Phyllis and young Sally, respectively, with Michael Williams and Cody Williams, respectively, as young Ben and young Buddy. Julie Hanson has a fine turn as the young Heidi.

Whether you enjoy wonderful music, enchanting choreography or a well-told tale, Follies has it all, and The Rep\u2019s production realizes its enduring brilliance.

Musical: Follies

Company: Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Venue: Browning Mainstage, Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road

Dates: Through October 2

Tickets: $18-$81.50; contact 968-4925 or www.repstl.org

Rating: A 5 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Jerry Naunheim Jr.

"}, {"id":"8951b829-1147-52df-8dd5-9497970ef6de","type":"article","starttime":"1473354000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-08T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473363067","priority":45,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"The Rep: Celebrating 50 Years","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_8951b829-1147-52df-8dd5-9497970ef6de.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/the-rep-celebrating-years/article_8951b829-1147-52df-8dd5-9497970ef6de.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/the-rep-celebrating-years/article_8951b829-1147-52df-8dd5-9497970ef6de.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":5,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Bryan A. Hollerbach","prologue":"One the preeminent institutions of St. Louis observes half a century of staging stellar productions.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["the rep","the repertory theatre of st. louis","follies","a christmas carol","all my sons","to kill a mockingbird","million dollar quartet"],"internalKeywords":["#topstory"],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"09c0eb4f-f159-5c38-a7d1-c873b43b59ca","description":"The Miser - 1968","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"494","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9c/09c0eb4f-f159-5c38-a7d1-c873b43b59ca/57d18e5985737.image.jpg?crop=1269%2C825%2C8%2C176&resize=760%2C494&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9c/09c0eb4f-f159-5c38-a7d1-c873b43b59ca/57d18e5985737.image.jpg?crop=1269%2C825%2C8%2C176&resize=100%2C65&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"195","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9c/09c0eb4f-f159-5c38-a7d1-c873b43b59ca/57d18e5985737.image.jpg?crop=1269%2C825%2C8%2C176&resize=300%2C195&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"666","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9c/09c0eb4f-f159-5c38-a7d1-c873b43b59ca/57d18e5985737.image.jpg?crop=1269%2C825%2C8%2C176&resize=1024%2C666&order=crop%2Cresize"}}},{"id":"1079ba00-7649-5fdc-b976-a4d03e0473db","description":"Georama - 2016","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"506","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/07/1079ba00-7649-5fdc-b976-a4d03e0473db/57d18e58d1062.image.jpg?resize=760%2C506"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/07/1079ba00-7649-5fdc-b976-a4d03e0473db/57d18e58d1062.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/07/1079ba00-7649-5fdc-b976-a4d03e0473db/57d18e58d1062.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"681","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/07/1079ba00-7649-5fdc-b976-a4d03e0473db/57d18e58d1062.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C681"}}},{"id":"2c93397b-a00a-56a4-a5ac-21ac887a143f","description":"Little Shop of Horrors - 1985","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"597","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c9/2c93397b-a00a-56a4-a5ac-21ac887a143f/57d18e59e3002.image.jpg?resize=597%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"127","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c9/2c93397b-a00a-56a4-a5ac-21ac887a143f/57d18e59e3002.image.jpg?resize=100%2C127"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"382","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c9/2c93397b-a00a-56a4-a5ac-21ac887a143f/57d18e59e3002.image.jpg?resize=300%2C382"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1304","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/c9/2c93397b-a00a-56a4-a5ac-21ac887a143f/57d18e59e3002.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1304"}}},{"id":"792e9e23-1a67-5bc7-a7ae-69762aa835e1","description":"To Kill A Mockingbird - 1995","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"547","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/92/792e9e23-1a67-5bc7-a7ae-69762aa835e1/57d18e5a4de8a.image.jpg?crop=827%2C1150%2C383%2C1&resize=547%2C760&order=crop%2Cresize"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"139","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/92/792e9e23-1a67-5bc7-a7ae-69762aa835e1/57d18e5a4de8a.image.jpg?crop=827%2C1150%2C383%2C1&resize=100%2C139&order=crop%2Cresize"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"417","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/92/792e9e23-1a67-5bc7-a7ae-69762aa835e1/57d18e5a4de8a.image.jpg?crop=827%2C1150%2C383%2C1&resize=300%2C417&order=crop%2Cresize"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1424","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/92/792e9e23-1a67-5bc7-a7ae-69762aa835e1/57d18e5a4de8a.image.jpg?crop=827%2C1150%2C383%2C1"}}},{"id":"c60faa0a-4601-5b01-91c8-33a336c9b9e0","description":"Into the Woods - 1999","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"543","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60faa0a-4601-5b01-91c8-33a336c9b9e0/57d18e5ae1c3e.image.jpg?resize=543%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"140","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60faa0a-4601-5b01-91c8-33a336c9b9e0/57d18e5ae1c3e.image.jpg?resize=100%2C140"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"420","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60faa0a-4601-5b01-91c8-33a336c9b9e0/57d18e5ae1c3e.image.jpg?resize=300%2C420"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1432","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/c/60/c60faa0a-4601-5b01-91c8-33a336c9b9e0/57d18e5ae1c3e.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1432"}}}],"revision":8,"commentID":"8951b829-1147-52df-8dd5-9497970ef6de","body":"
\"the

The Miser - 1968

The year 1966 saw the establishment of two cultural icons here, one of which \u2013 Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates\u2019 glorious Busch Stadium \u2013 already has fallen to time\u2019s passage. And the other?

Well, The Rep \u2013 only its mother, frankly, ever calls it \u201cThe Repertory Theatre of St. Louis\u201d \u2013 this year celebrates its 50th anniversary with an appropriately golden sextet on its Mainstage at Webster Groves\u2019 Loretto-Hilton Center: Follies, Until the Flood, A Christmas Carol, All My Sons, To Kill a Mockingbird and Million Dollar Quartet.

And to cue a handy clich\u00e9, Steven Woolf (now observing his own 30th anniversary as The Rep\u2019s artistic director) sounds as pleased as punch about the anniversary-year series.

\u201cFollies is a remarkable theatrical enterprise,\u201d Woolf says of the series\u2019 first production, which opened just two days ago. \u201cIt has a brilliant score and fascinating script. It\u2019s not often performed because of the size of the show, and it\u2019s a magnificent way to launch the 50th season of The Rep.

\"CMYK_1985

Little Shop of Horrors - 1985

\u201cThe cast includes three Tony-nominated performers, as well as others who have major Broadway credits, plus some excellent St. Louis performers, too. It\u2019s a show that explores the complexities of relationships, set in a world of show business where ghosts from the past become part of the present-day \u2013 1971 \u2013 story.

\u201cIts musical numbers reflect many moods and eras of productions of a [Ziegfeld Follies-style revue] and also the sometime folly involved in relationships. It\u2019s a multigenerational theatrical extravaganza.\u201d

The remainder of the Mainstage season Woolf characterizes as \u201ca series of shows that have very different styles and have fascinating stories and show a wide range of theatricality and ideas.\u201d

With the exception of A Christmas Carol \u2013 scheduled for the holiday season, for obvious reasons \u2013 he also succinctly explains the arrangement of the six individual productions in the series.

\u201cSome of the sequencing may have to do with the availability of creative teams to work a show into their own schedules,\u201d Woolf says, \u201cand also, the way a season is developed has kind of its own special flow [from] year to year.\u201d

In addition to joining the theatrical community in specific and the larger community in general in celebrating The Rep\u2019s 50th anniversary, Woolf is quietly celebrating another event of no small significance: a $1 million endowment of the theater\u2019s artistic directorship by the Augustin family.

\"CMYK_1995ToKillaMockingbird.jpg\"

To Kill A Mockingbird - 1995

The family in question, which reportedly has supported The Rep for decades both by making financial gifts and by serving on its board of directors, made that endowment \u2013 the largest single gift in The Rep\u2019s history \u2013 in July.

\u201cI was thrilled and honored by the generosity of the Augustin gift,\u201d Woolf notes of the endowment. \u201cIt is remarkably generous and humbling.\u201d

He also reflects briefly on triumphs and challenges for The Rep throughout its many years.

\u201cThere is no question that our Off-Ramp series was an artistic and theatrical high point for the organization,\u201d Woolf says, referring to a four-season program that ran in The Grandel Theatre from 2005 to 2009 and included such productions as The Lieutenant of Inishmore by Martin McDonagh and The Little Dog Laughed by Douglas Carter Beane. \u201cThe work was special, and it\u2019s too bad that it turned out to be simply financially impossible to continue.\u201d

Among challenges for The Rep, both resolved and ongoing, Woolf continues: \u201cOne of the biggest for us as well as other arts organizations is to be able to attract a younger cohort to join our audiences to experience the magic and surprise of theatrical performances.\u201d

\"into

Into the Woods - 1999

In that regard, when asked which production or productions top his informal wish list as The Rep\u2019s head honcho, Woolf mulls the matter a moment.

\u201cI\u2019m not sure I have a real cogent answer here,\u201d he replies. \u201cI\u2019d love to be able to stage Here Lies Love \u2013 which is a remarkable piece about Imelda Marcos with music by David Byrne and Fatboy Slim. Full of music and video. Very special. I\u2019d also love to find a way to produce Mnemonic, a mesmerizing story put together by a company called Complicite that is French-based and run by Simon McBurney.\u201d

When asked which improvements or general changes, in the short term and the long term alike, Woolf would like to implement at The Rep, his response sounds a wholly pragmatic note.

\u201cIt would be wonderful if we could have an expansion of our lobby space \u2013 it would give audience members more space to move around,\u201d he says. \u201cThis also would involve more restroom facilities.\u201d

Lobby and lavatory upgrades? Those might seem unthinkably modest objectives to some, especially in the context of one of St. Louis\u2019 preeminent institutions.

Then again, modesty has its merits \u2013 and in an era rife with abject grandiosity, to borrow a few phrases from the source of The Rep\u2019s third 2016-17 production, a profoundly modest but meaningful gulf separates Marley being \u201cas dead as a door-nail\u201d and Tiny Tim\u2019s final \u201cGod bless Us, Every One!\u201d

The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves, 314-968-4925, repstl.org

\"Georama

Georama - 2016

Golden Jubilee Lineup

To celebrate its 50th anniversary, The Rep\u2019s presenting these six Mainstage productions, subscriptions to which run between $108 and $489.

Follies, Sept. 7 to Oct. 2. This Stephen Sondheim musical \u2013 directed by Rob Ruggiero, with a book by James Goldman \u2013 salutes showbiz in style and explores love and memory. On debuting on Broadway in 1971, it won seven Tony Awards, including Best Score, Best Choreography and Best Leading Actress in a Musical.

Until the Flood, Oct. 12 to Nov. 6. The Rep commissioned writer, performer and Pulitzer Prize finalist Dael Orlandersmith to write and perform a one-woman play about recent unrest in St. Louis. In this world premiere directed by Neel Keller, she\u2019ll depict how community residents felt about having our city thrust into a spotlight it neither expected nor relished.

A Christmas Carol, Nov. 30 to Dec. 24. Augustin Family Artistic Director Steven Woolf himself will direct this David H. Bell adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic. The immortal Ebenezer Scrooge returns to The Rep for the first time in 35 years, to remind us all of the increasingly rare virtues of empathy, compassion and generosity.

All My Sons, Jan. 4 to 29. Seth Gordon will direct Arthur Miller\u2019s searing breakthrough drama about a corrupt World War II factory owner and his family. When it bowed on Broadway in 1947, All My Sons won Tonys for Best Author and Best Direction of a Play.

To Kill a Mockingbird, Feb. 8 to March 5. Harper Lee\u2019s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel will come to the stage in this adaptation by Christopher Sergel, directed by Risa Brainin. Lee\u2019s multitudinous fans almost certainly will flock to the production, especially in light of her death this year as well as the controversial publication of the pseudo-sequel, Go Set a Watchman, last year.

Million Dollar Quartet, March 15 to April 9. Johnny! Jerry Lee! Carl! Elvis! For one brief, shining moment in music history, this fab foursome made Memphis\u2019 Sun Studio go nova. Hunter Foster will direct this production, with a book by Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux, who provided the original concept.

"}, {"id":"df10c2d5-49a6-52b0-ac84-d39bf1529e38","type":"article","starttime":"1473354000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-08T12:00:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473361623","priority":40,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: Jazz St. Louis Reflects Rich Musical Heritage","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_df10c2d5-49a6-52b0-ac84-d39bf1529e38.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-jazz-st-louis-reflects-rich-musical-heritage/article_df10c2d5-49a6-52b0-ac84-d39bf1529e38.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-jazz-st-louis-reflects-rich-musical-heritage/article_df10c2d5-49a6-52b0-ac84-d39bf1529e38.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mark Bretz","prologue":"The Lou has nurtured harmonies and melodies since Scott Joplin tickled the ivories in a new phenomenon called ragtime.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["jazz st. louis"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"a70d972b-801a-5344-8200-281d917980a2","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"508","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/70/a70d972b-801a-5344-8200-281d917980a2/57c4a8a80b874.image.jpg?resize=760%2C508"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/70/a70d972b-801a-5344-8200-281d917980a2/57c4a8a80b874.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"201","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/70/a70d972b-801a-5344-8200-281d917980a2/57c4a8a80b874.image.jpg?resize=300%2C201"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"685","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/70/a70d972b-801a-5344-8200-281d917980a2/57c4a8a80b874.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":7,"commentID":"df10c2d5-49a6-52b0-ac84-d39bf1529e38","body":"
\"Jazz\"
Jazz

St. Louis has the music.

Located on the Mississippi River with other musically renowned cities like Memphis and New Orleans, the Lou has nurtured harmonies and melodies since Scott Joplin tickled the ivories in a new phenomenon called ragtime. Also, our own Chuck Berry numbered among the earliest practitioners of the genre dubbed rock \u2019n\u2019 roll, and St. Louis now boasts Downtown\u2019s National Blues Museum.

A city with so rich a sonic heritage likewise should be expected to have a profile in that most American of musical forms, jazz. Through the efforts of the late Barbara Rose, appreciation for that form in St. Louis on a larger scale took off in the 1990s with a program in Downtown\u2019s Hotel Majestic called Just Jazz.

Her many contacts in the music business allowed the widely respected woman known as \u201cJazz Mom\u201d to present nationally known and internationally renowned musicians in a small, intimate atmosphere at the hotel. In 1995, she moved the program to Grand Center, where it was renamed Jazz at the Bistro and officially incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 1998.

When Rose succumbed to breast cancer that same year, Jazz at the Bistro looked for someone with the stature and savvy to move it boldly into the 21st century. Gene Dobbs Bradford, a Maryland native who had directed operations for the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra since 1994, was named executive director in 1999.

Bradford, now president and CEO, has built the organization\u2019s income from $375,000 to $2.8 million today. He\u2019s also overseen its successful $10 million capital campaign and seen Jazz St. Louis (the umbrella name given to the organization in 2006) adapt to its renovated facility in the Harold & Dorothy Steward Center for Jazz at 3536 Washington Ave.

\u201cEver since the renovation, top musicians have been saying Jazz at the Bistro is one of the top-five jazz venues in the world,\u201d says Bradford. The upgraded facility, which includes a 200-seat club at the Steward Center, is something \u201cSt. Louis is going to be proud of,\u201d adds Bradford. \u201cUnlike New York or San Francisco, with big markets and a tourism industry, we need to build up a strong base in our own community.\u201d

Bradford recognizes the importance of the Steward Center performance space for Jazz at the Bistro to thrive. \u201cPeople who love jazz will go to the worst dive to see artists, and they love to brag about suffering for art,\u201d he notes with a chuckle. \u201cMost people aren\u2019t like that, though. We wanted to build a place that is very welcoming for everyone.\u201d

Jazz St. Louis yearly fills its schedule with more than 300 concerts, a staggering total for any arts organization. \u201cOur artistic director, Bob Bennett, does the booking with a little help from yours truly and a couple of other members of our staff,\u201d says Bradford. \u201cWe try to find artists who are the top touring jazz musicians in the world and bring them in here for a four-night run.\u201d

The third season in Jazz St. Louis\u2019 new home will introduce the organization\u2019s Thursday Morning Coffee Concerts, featuring selected performers in 11 a.m. gigs. Additionally, 11 different artists will debut as Jazz at the Bistro headliners in performances at both 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

The Thursday morning concerts resulted from an analysis of Jazz at the Bistro audiences, including potential patrons. \u201cWe found that there are people who aren\u2019t able to come to shows at night,\u201d says Bradford. \u201cSo this year we\u2019re launching the coffee concerts, which are pulled together from the Barbara Rose Series and our subscription series. Our morning concerts will serve complimentary coffee and donuts courtesy of Tim Hortons.\u201d

About other marquee performances, he continues, \u201cWe have a series dedicated to Barbara Rose that features top pianists. Barbara loved jazz trios consisting of piano, bass and drums. And last year, for our 20th anniversary, we had a season reflecting our heritage.\u201d

Besides the Jazz at the Bistro series, Jazz St. Louis seeks to fill an educational role at its Centene Jazz Education Center, which opened in 2014. \u201cWe have a core value of continuous improvement,\u201d says Bradford, \u201cto find a better way to do things, reach a bigger audience. We want people to speak about jazz with the same kind of pride as the Arch, the Cardinals and Ted Drewes. This is a part of our community.\u201d

The Steward Center, which opened in 2014, includes not only the education center, but also Nancy\u2019s Jazz Lounge and the Ferring Jazz at the Bistro series. \u201cWe have practice rooms and rehearsal rooms for students,\u201d notes Bradford. \u201cIt\u2019s very common for students to interact with musicians who perform at the bistro as well as with top jazz educators.\u201d

He adds, \u201cWe work with school districts throughout the metropolitan area. We\u2019re focused on a few, including Riverview Gardens, Normandy and East St. Louis. We also do educational activities elsewhere, including Warren County, St. Louis City schools, the archdiocese, Ferguson-Florissant, University City, Webster Groves and Kirkwood.\u201d

Bradford believes the National Blues Museum and similar attractions complement Jazz St. Louis. \u201cWe can boast leadership from rock \u2019n\u2019 roll to blues to jazz,\u201d he observes, \u201cwith Chuck Berry, Ike and Tina Turner \u2013 even Nelly will be performing with the symphony, so add hip-hop to that.\u201d

Through its hundreds of annual concerts, Jazz at the Bistro features \u201ca lot of different styles of jazz,\u201d notes Bradford. \u201cAl Jarreau [on Sept. 30 and Oct. 1] will be doing a special show, a duo featuring Al and a pianist.\u201d The tandem performance will mark the world-famous jazz vocalist\u2019s Jazz at the Bistro premiere. \u201cOther styles include Ann Hampton Calloway\u2019s cabaret jazz and what we call the \u2018straight ahead\u2019 jazz melodies of the Clayton Brothers, as well as modern jazz and fusion.\u201d

When Jazz St. Louis isn\u2019t booking national acts, it fills the bistro with area performers. \u201cWe have a strong commitment to the local jazz scene here,\u201d says Bradford. \u201cIn weeks that are nonsubscription, we focus Jazz St. Louis\u2019 Local Spotlight Series on local artists such as Good 4 the Soul, Dawn Weber and folks like that.\u201d

On most nights throughout the year, the joint\u2019s jumpin\u2019 at Jazz at the Bistro. For a complete listing of the 2016-17 season, visit jazzstl.org. Call 314-571-6000 for information, or check Ladue News\u2019 Fall Arts Guide at laduenews.com.

"}, {"id":"9b1982bd-bafa-594e-ac18-4eb5e626a28f","type":"article","starttime":"1473354000","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-08T12:00:00-05:00","priority":35,"sections":[{"arts-and-culture":"arts-and-culture"},{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dinner & A Show: BaiKu Sushi Lounge","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/article_9b1982bd-bafa-594e-ac18-4eb5e626a28f.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-baiku-sushi-lounge/article_9b1982bd-bafa-594e-ac18-4eb5e626a28f.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/dinner-a-show-baiku-sushi-lounge/article_9b1982bd-bafa-594e-ac18-4eb5e626a28f.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":4,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"Mabel Suen","prologue":"At BaiKu Sushi Lounge, newly appointed executive chef Eliott Harris is rolling out his take on the concept with a focus on freshness.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["baiku sushi lounge","midtown","hotel ignacio"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"bcd93526-2238-54bb-828b-a6392a21d3cb","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"519","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/cd/bcd93526-2238-54bb-828b-a6392a21d3cb/57cece481d68c.image.jpg?resize=760%2C519"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"68","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/cd/bcd93526-2238-54bb-828b-a6392a21d3cb/57cece481d68c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C68"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"205","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/cd/bcd93526-2238-54bb-828b-a6392a21d3cb/57cece481d68c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C205"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"700","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/cd/bcd93526-2238-54bb-828b-a6392a21d3cb/57cece481d68c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C700"}}},{"id":"0d9b1ad4-77e2-597f-b4a2-46b740e92e4b","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"496","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d9b1ad4-77e2-597f-b4a2-46b740e92e4b/57d188af1a938.image.jpg?resize=760%2C496"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"65","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d9b1ad4-77e2-597f-b4a2-46b740e92e4b/57d188af1a938.image.jpg?resize=100%2C65"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"196","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d9b1ad4-77e2-597f-b4a2-46b740e92e4b/57d188af1a938.image.jpg?resize=300%2C196"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"669","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/d9/0d9b1ad4-77e2-597f-b4a2-46b740e92e4b/57d188af1a938.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"74f40148-be8d-5084-af70-d36f93ffc89d","description":"","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4f/74f40148-be8d-5084-af70-d36f93ffc89d/57d188af8fa37.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4f/74f40148-be8d-5084-af70-d36f93ffc89d/57d188af8fa37.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4f/74f40148-be8d-5084-af70-d36f93ffc89d/57d188af8fa37.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"683","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/4f/74f40148-be8d-5084-af70-d36f93ffc89d/57d188af8fa37.image.jpg"}}},{"id":"ee50aa0c-5261-5899-af96-df010dfe0a48","description":"Executive chef Eliott Harris","byline":"Photos by Mabel Suen","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"547","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e5/ee50aa0c-5261-5899-af96-df010dfe0a48/57d188afd7045.image.jpg?resize=760%2C547"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"72","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e5/ee50aa0c-5261-5899-af96-df010dfe0a48/57d188afd7045.image.jpg?resize=100%2C72"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"216","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e5/ee50aa0c-5261-5899-af96-df010dfe0a48/57d188afd7045.image.jpg?resize=300%2C216"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"737","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/e5/ee50aa0c-5261-5899-af96-df010dfe0a48/57d188afd7045.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":13,"commentID":"9b1982bd-bafa-594e-ac18-4eb5e626a28f","body":"
\"Baiku
Baiku NEW

At BaiKu Sushi Lounge, newly appointed executive chef Eliott Harris is rolling out his take on the concept with a focus on freshness. The Midtown sushi restaurant originally opened in Hotel Ignacio in October 2014 and closed in January due to construction on the building. It reopened on April 26 under new leadership with an updated menu.

Harris previously served as the executive chef of Brad Beracha\u2019s now-shuttered restaurant Miso. His 20 years of experience behind a sushi bar also includes owning the sushi-centric food truck Chop Shop STL and serving as the sushi consultant for Central Table Food Hall. After selling his food truck last December, Harris worked his way back into Beracha\u2019s kitchens. He collaborates with former Sekisui sushi chef Kenji Nemoto to retool the restaurant\u2019s chilled offerings while highlighting traditional techniques.

\u201cI want to focus on the straightforward, simple flavors of quality fresh fish,\u201d Harris says. \u201cI\u2019m sourcing seafood from all over the globe, and it just really shows in the taste and flavors of our dishes. There\u2019s nothing wrong with a good roll, but I\u2019m more of a purist.\u201d

Although Harris inherited the main body of BaiKu\u2019s former menu, patrons will notice a variety of new items, including Harris\u2019 chilled poke bowl made up of ahi tuna dressed in a spicy miso sauce with cucumber, Maui onion, wakame, shrimp chips and kimchi furikake.

Another one of his creations, the magic mushroom roll, comes artfully plated with salmon, snow crab, avocado, enoki mushrooms, yamagobo, chili aioli, house-cured roe, scallions and a sweet-soy reduction.

On the hot side of the kitchen, which is shared with BaiKu\u2019s sister restaurant, Triumph Grill, chefs Ryan Cooper and Mike Burnau debut several dishes to fill out the menu, including a grilled octopus salad, pad thai and a grilled pork-belly entr\u00e9e. Another addition, taro tacos, consists of soy-glazed duck confit in a taro shell with yuzu slaw, pickled Fresno pepper, avocado mash and a sweet-soy reduction.

Most prominently, however, Harris intends to showcase fresh daily fish presented in nigiri or sashimi styles. He also features regular rotating specials, such as uni shooters with Hokkaido sea urchin, quail egg, tobiko, green onion, radish sprout and ponzu.

\u201cThere\u2019s just a ton of experience behind this sushi bar and with that comes passion,\u201d Harris says. \u201cWe\u2019ve honed our crafts for decades, between knife skills and breaking down the fish to balance flavors and textures. The technique is something you taste and see when you sit down at our sushi bar.\u201d

BaiKu Sushi Lounge, 3407 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-896-2500, baikustl.com

\"Feast_BaiKu_20160520_ByMabelSuen_002.jpg\"
Feast_BaiKu_20160520_ByMabelSuen_002.jpg
\"Feast_BaiKu_20160520_ByMabelSuen_004.jpg\"
Feast_BaiKu_20160520_ByMabelSuen_004.jpg
\"Feast_BaiKu_20160520_ByMabelSuen_009.jpg\"

Executive chef Eliott Harris

"}, {"id":"4598b312-7545-11e6-aa89-979d00d24fda","type":"article","starttime":"1473285060","starttime_iso8601":"2016-09-07T16:51:00-05:00","lastupdated":"1473435554","priority":40,"sections":[{"features":"arts-and-culture/features"}],"application":"editorial","title":"R-S Theatrics' 'Love? Actually..' Is a Light-Hearted Potpourri of Song, Dance and Comedy: Review","url":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/article_4598b312-7545-11e6-aa89-979d00d24fda.html","permalink":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/r-s-theatrics-love-actually-is-a-light-hearted-potpourri/article_4598b312-7545-11e6-aa89-979d00d24fda.html","canonical":"http://www.laduenews.com/arts-and-culture/features/r-s-theatrics-love-actually-is-a-light-hearted-potpourri/article_4598b312-7545-11e6-aa89-979d00d24fda.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":9,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"by Mark Bretz","prologue":"Story: R-S Theatrics opens its sixth season, \u201cThe Season of Semi-Requited Love,\u201d with a trio of musical works. The first, Out of a Bowl, features various performers singing solo, in duet or in a group, depending on which slips of paper from a bowl placed on stage are selected by randomly selected audience members.","supportsComments":true,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["playhouse at westport plaza","westport plaza","r-s theatrics","love actually","lin-manuel miranda","christina rios","theater","musical","review"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"images":[{"id":"a06167b0-7538-11e6-9949-dfa007a5758a","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"507","height":"760","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/06/a06167b0-7538-11e6-9949-dfa007a5758a/57d076bb14c4c.image.jpg?resize=507%2C760"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"150","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/06/a06167b0-7538-11e6-9949-dfa007a5758a/57d076bb14c4c.image.jpg?resize=100%2C150"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"450","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/06/a06167b0-7538-11e6-9949-dfa007a5758a/57d076bb14c4c.image.jpg?resize=300%2C450"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1536","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/06/a06167b0-7538-11e6-9949-dfa007a5758a/57d076bb14c4c.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1536"}}},{"id":"b8a8f1b2-7538-11e6-80e8-4348bd7e522b","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8a/b8a8f1b2-7538-11e6-80e8-4348bd7e522b/57d076e3c81bd.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8a/b8a8f1b2-7538-11e6-80e8-4348bd7e522b/57d076e3c81bd.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8a/b8a8f1b2-7538-11e6-80e8-4348bd7e522b/57d076e3c81bd.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/8a/b8a8f1b2-7538-11e6-80e8-4348bd7e522b/57d076e3c81bd.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"d27f9aaa-7538-11e6-8850-f3418a6f49cb","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/27/d27f9aaa-7538-11e6-8850-f3418a6f49cb/57d0770f2968d.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/27/d27f9aaa-7538-11e6-8850-f3418a6f49cb/57d0770f2968d.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/27/d27f9aaa-7538-11e6-8850-f3418a6f49cb/57d0770f2968d.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/27/d27f9aaa-7538-11e6-8850-f3418a6f49cb/57d0770f2968d.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"0fdb3774-7539-11e6-ada8-fb42a768dbda","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fd/0fdb3774-7539-11e6-ada8-fb42a768dbda/57d077761a901.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fd/0fdb3774-7539-11e6-ada8-fb42a768dbda/57d077761a901.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fd/0fdb3774-7539-11e6-ada8-fb42a768dbda/57d077761a901.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/fd/0fdb3774-7539-11e6-ada8-fb42a768dbda/57d077761a901.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"24ff15c6-7539-11e6-9fdb-7fa3f00b9370","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4f/24ff15c6-7539-11e6-9fdb-7fa3f00b9370/57d077998cdbd.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4f/24ff15c6-7539-11e6-9fdb-7fa3f00b9370/57d077998cdbd.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4f/24ff15c6-7539-11e6-9fdb-7fa3f00b9370/57d077998cdbd.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/2/4f/24ff15c6-7539-11e6-9fdb-7fa3f00b9370/57d077998cdbd.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"e84254f4-7538-11e6-a437-db5d9045fd56","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/84/e84254f4-7538-11e6-a437-db5d9045fd56/57d07733a4d26.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/84/e84254f4-7538-11e6-a437-db5d9045fd56/57d07733a4d26.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/84/e84254f4-7538-11e6-a437-db5d9045fd56/57d07733a4d26.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/84/e84254f4-7538-11e6-a437-db5d9045fd56/57d07733a4d26.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"fcd6ee84-7538-11e6-b1a4-570cb0e94a7b","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/cd/fcd6ee84-7538-11e6-b1a4-570cb0e94a7b/57d0775631be3.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/cd/fcd6ee84-7538-11e6-b1a4-570cb0e94a7b/57d0775631be3.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/cd/fcd6ee84-7538-11e6-b1a4-570cb0e94a7b/57d0775631be3.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/cd/fcd6ee84-7538-11e6-b1a4-570cb0e94a7b/57d0775631be3.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"615bfdbe-7538-11e6-be03-37ffa90e7d78","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/15/615bfdbe-7538-11e6-be03-37ffa90e7d78/57d076515623b.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/15/615bfdbe-7538-11e6-be03-37ffa90e7d78/57d076515623b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/15/615bfdbe-7538-11e6-be03-37ffa90e7d78/57d076515623b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/6/15/615bfdbe-7538-11e6-be03-37ffa90e7d78/57d076515623b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}},{"id":"78138e50-7538-11e6-8d3f-eb6602daea30","description":"","byline":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"760","height":"507","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/81/78138e50-7538-11e6-8d3f-eb6602daea30/57d0767771b17.image.jpg?resize=760%2C507"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/81/78138e50-7538-11e6-8d3f-eb6602daea30/57d0767771b17.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/81/78138e50-7538-11e6-8d3f-eb6602daea30/57d0767771b17.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"http://bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com/laduenews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/81/78138e50-7538-11e6-8d3f-eb6602daea30/57d0767771b17.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":6,"commentID":"4598b312-7545-11e6-aa89-979d00d24fda","body":"

Story: R-S Theatrics opens its sixth season, \u201cThe Season of Semi-Requited Love,\u201d with a trio of musical works. The first, Out of a Bowl, features various performers singing solo, in duet or in a group, depending on which slips of paper from a bowl placed on stage are selected by randomly selected audience members.

A comic interlude features a tour guide at Mount Rushmore giving an impromptu, and highly irregular, talk to visitors to the national monument on topics including little-known \u2018facts\u2019 about the four sculpted American presidents as well as the guide\u2019s former lover.

The second piece in the musical portion is a one-act opera titled Thyrsis & Amaranth, in which a young woman named Thyrsis decides at long last to reveal to her friend Amaranth her passionate love for her long-time best pal.

The show concludes with 21 Chump Street, a hip-hop musical about a Florida high school student who falls romantically for the new girl in his class, who says she is Puerto Rican and Dominican and from New York City. Senior honors student, clean-cut Justin initially resists Naomi\u2019s request that he get her some drugs, unaware that she actually is an undercover narcotics officer, but eventually her insistence leads him to a troubling decision.

Highlights: An energetic cast flexes its musical muscles in this potpourri of song and dance imaginatively assembled by R-S Theatrics artistic director Christina Rios, supported by her merry medley of musicians and technical designers. Love? Actually\u2026is a generally entertaining and lighthearted romp that showcases a variety of talents.

Other Info: R-S Theatrics recently announced that its seventh season in 2017 will feature Lin-Manuel Miranda\u2019s Tony Award-winning 2008 musical, In the Heights, at its new home in the .ZACK Performing Arts Incubator space in the historic Cadillac Building at 3224 Locust Street in Grand Center. That\u2019ll be an exciting move for the company, which never has had its own home venue.

For now, though, Love? Actually\u2026 is being performed in the Playhouse at Westport Plaza, which is under new ownership that has grand plans of its own with a 2016-17 series starting in late September that will focus on comedies.

Rios scores points directing this inventive evening of song and dance plus a little comedy sprinkled in courtesy of cameo performer Colleen Backer. Following the initial piece, Out of a Bowl, which on opening night featured several pleasant, if unmemorable, tunes sung by several cast members, Backer made her way from an aisle onto the stage. She delivered a weirdly wonderful monologue spoken by a tour guide who had, she indicated, been wronged by her lover and fellow guide at the Mount Rushmore National Monument.

Backer has a droll delivery that she utilizes expertly to spout odd, warped observations whose humor is accentuated by her deadpan approach. The absurdly silly speech by Backer then segued, naturally, into Steven Serpa\u2019s one-act opera, Thyrsis & Amaranth.

The Canadian composer and lyricist updated the story from 17th century French writer Jean de La Fontaine\u2019s Original Fables of La Fontaine, which told of the unrequited love of the shepherd Thyrsis for a woman named Amaranth.

In Serpa\u2019s version, Thyrsis is a young woman who works up the nerve to finally tell her childhood friend, the beautiful Amaranth, that she is madly in love with her. Amaranth isn\u2019t the brightest bulb in the chandelier, and so Thyrsis gives her several examples of the emotion called love.\u00a0 Eventually, though, Thyrsis is disheartened by the results of Amaranth\u2019s \u2018education.\u2019

Lindsay Rae Gingrich and Eileen Engel do nice work as Thyrsis and Amaranth, respectively, demonstrating fine singing voices. They\u2019re ably assisted by musical director Leah Luciano\u2019s accompaniment on piano as well as the contributions of M. Joshua Ryan on electric bass, cellist Alexander Schutt, guitarist D. Mike Bauer, violinist Shaylynn Sienkiewicz and Devin Lowe on percussion.

Taylor Pietz\u2019s lively choreography showcases the exuberance and vitality evident in Lin-Manuel Miranda\u2019s 21 Chump Street, a one-act musical based on a story that originally aired on NPR\u2019s This American Life. Miranda\u2019s effervescent music is cleverly realized in the moves Pietz stages for a backup boy trio comprised of Kevin Corpuz, Omega Jones and Phil Leveling as three laid-back teens who\u2019d rather dance than study in this spoof of the old TV series, 21 Jump Street.

Kelvin Urday does a nice job portraying Justin, the honors student whose life is turned upside down in more ways than one when he falls for the \u2018new girl\u2019 Naomi, who actually is a 25-year-old undercover cop. Natasha Toro as Naomi shares an easy chemistry with Urday and also conveys the officer\u2019s selfish motives in luring Justin to his doom. Sarajane Alverson lends her talents to the role of the story\u2019s narrator.

Rios directs the diverse elements of this evening briskly and effectively, taking advantage of the diminutive Westport Playhouse stage, e.g., by using access aisles and housing the band at the rear of stage left.

Costume designer Amy Harrison dresses the performers in the Jump Street parody in attire that matches their characters' age. Scenic designer Keller Ryan uses a couple of simple sets for the second and third acts to efficiently define the locales, with lighting and sound design provided by Nathan Schroeder and Mark Kelley, respectively.

Love? Actually\u2026is a pleasant diversion that cleverly strings together three mini-musical motifs with a bizarre comedy bridge. In this case, the sum is equal to the parts from a variety of sources.

Musical: Love? Actually\u2026

Company: R-S Theatrics

Venue: The Playhouse at Westport Plaza

Dates: September 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18

Tickets: $15-$25; contact www.r-stheatrics.com, rstheatrics@gmail.com or 252-8812

Rating:\u00a0 A 4 on a scale of 1-to-5.

Photos courtesy of Michael Young

"} ]